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How do I cut a weld between to panels without destroying either pannel?

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  • How do I cut a weld between to panels without destroying either pannel?

    I am restoring a 40 Ford pickup and the previous owner welded the front fenders to the running boards. I need to separate these without destroying either the fenders or the runnung boards. What is the best way to do that?
    Help!! I have NO welding experience . .
    8
    Yes
    25.00%
    2
    No
    0.00%
    0
    Need more information
    62.50%
    5
    Makes no sense . .
    12.50%
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    The poll is expired.

    Last edited by JimUS023372; 09-28-2009, 08:23 AM. Reason: spelling

  • #2
    Can you post some pictures so we can see exactly what the situation is?

    You haven't given enough info to really help you, all we can do is guess at what the problem is.

    Was it spot welded, plug welded, seam welded, etc...etc....

    that all makes a difference on getting it apart.
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    sigpicJohn Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JimUS023372 View Post
      I am restoring a 40 Ford pickup and the previous owner welded the front fenders to the running boards. I need to separate these without destroying either the fenders or the runnung boards. What is the best way to do that?
      Help!! I have NO welding experience . .
      No matter what your going to be doing some structural body work on the RB and fenders once you get them apart. Time to learn When we see the pics we can point you in the right direction.
      "Better Metalworking Through Research"

      Miller Dynasty 300DX
      Miller Dynasty 200DX
      Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
      Miller Millermatic Passport

      Miller Spot Welder
      Motor-Guard stud welder

      Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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      • #4
        I would just cut the center of the weld with a die grinder

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        • #5
          Originally posted by m.k.swelding View Post
          I would just cut the center of the weld with a die grinder
          yep thats what i would do to just cut the weld slowly and just enough to get it to let go and then grind the rest of the weld off
          then weld or bondo if needed
          hope this helps
          gary...

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          • #6
            I will post some pictures ..

            Thanks for the replies. I agree with the suggestion to cut it slowly - just enough to get them free from one another. I was hoping to minimize the damage. The welds are seam-welds along the entire length of where the fender and running board meet. I will post some pictures as soon as I take them. Jim

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            • #7
              Could also gouge the stitch welds with a small diameter electrode. If you are able to get a grinder and zipcut in there it might be your best bet.

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              • #8
                Assuming the weld is straight and clean enough, an .045 cutoff wheel, whether on a die grinder or a small sidewinder.
                Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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                • #9
                  even thinner of a cut can be made with a dremel cut off wheel I believe
                  "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                  Miller Dynasty 300DX
                  Miller Dynasty 200DX
                  Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                  Miller Millermatic Passport

                  Miller Spot Welder
                  Motor-Guard stud welder

                  Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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