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  • Transporting Tanks

    I have been transporting my cylinders in the back of my truck using tie down straps. Is this a safe method or is there a better way?
    Thanks,
    Nick

  • #2
    Hey Nick; Hows things these days ?

    Anyway as long as they are standing Up, I don't see any problems !

    .............. Norm
    www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

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    • #3
      As long as they are secured in some manner so they don't go anywhere in an accident. It is o/k to lay them down also but remember that after an acetylene is laid down it needs to be upright for acertain time before you should use it. The time frame has been debated a lot with different opinions but I use 2 hours. Other bottles it doesn't matter.
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      • #4
        If you are just referring to a few tanks, no big deal. But remember that even though it is in a pick-up truck you can only haul so many before you need a CDL with a HAZ MAT certification.
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        • #5
          Depends on what you mean by "using tie down straps"

          Gas bottles (Oxygen, Argon, etc) are ok in any position, but acetylene is better vertical due to the filler.

          In most of the US, regulations require that all tanks be secured so that they can not move, and many states require all tanks be transported vertical, valve up, with valve cap fit if the tank is equipped for it. There are, as far as I know, no specifics as to HOW they must be secured, Most commercial suppliers in the northeast use ratchet straps and transport on a rack body for larger deliveries. Small load may be run in a pickup with stanchions, rack sides, or frames (often just a headache rack) to tie the bottles to. This is the best option.

          Key, as mentioned, it that they can't move in transit, and won't fly free in an accident. If they are layed down, they should be base solid to the front of the bed and tied in so they can't hop, preferably with bracing to prevent shifting sideways or rearward. Driving wedge chocks in will NOT prevent them from moving, as the chocks may work free.


          That said, many, many bottles are transported laying down and loose in the back of trucks every day with few incidents, but it isn't good practice.

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          • #6
            Hmm, tossing a 60 cu.ft. Argon tank in the trunk well of my RX9 is probalby not the best solution then. (**** hobbiests!)

            The above advise makes sense.
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            • #7
              Hmm, tossing a 60 cu.ft. Argon tank in the trunk well of my RX9 is probalby not the best solution then. (**** hobbiests!)
              That car doesn't have a sun roof???

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              • #8
                Thanks for the information. I transport only one tank at a time. The only way I have done this (which is probably incorrect ) is I place the bottom of the tank towards the cab with the tank lying down in the bed. I use rachet straps and the tie downs in the bed to cinch the tank against the side of the bed so that it can't move. Let me know your thoughts.
                Thanks,
                Nick

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                • #9
                  If you are laying the tank down, this is how to do it. Just try to keep the bottom of the tank up against the front of the bed so it can't move under hard braking. It is REALLY tough to cinch tight enough that the tank can't slip, which is one of the reasons standing up is prefered... if the straps loosen a little, the tank won't slip out.


                  Originally posted by kiwi View Post
                  Thanks for the information. I transport only one tank at a time. The only way I have done this (which is probably incorrect ) is I place the bottom of the tank towards the cab with the tank lying down in the bed. I use rachet straps and the tie downs in the bed to cinch the tank against the side of the bed so that it can't move. Let me know your thoughts.
                  Thanks,
                  Nick

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kiwi View Post
                    I have been transporting my cylinders in the back of my truck using tie down straps. Is this a safe method or is there a better way?
                    Thanks,
                    Nick
                    You need to talk to the department of transport and find out the local rules regarding this in your area. All the rules are different everywhere from province to province state to state ect. Local regs and laws are different everywhere,don't take someone's word for it. Jef

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                    • #11
                      According to OSHA:

                      1926.350(a)(4)

                      When cylinders are transported by powered vehicles, they shall be secured in a vertical position.

                      Also, please remember that state osha standards need to at least meet & exceed federal OSHA laws.

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                      • #12
                        I'm pretty sure DOT overrules OSHA on the roadways. OSHA is for job sites. There are exceptions to the OSHA rule about bottles standing if you dig deeper through the regulations. I remember years ago looking into this. What I found was you get different answers from different authorities. DOT, state police, local police, etc. The bottom line is bottles get transported standing & laying down all the time & as long as they are securely held in place no one should bother you. But if someone wants to write you up they will find something.
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                        • #13
                          OSHA and DOT regulations have no effect on a guy hauling personal property for personal reasons in a personal vehicle.

                          Unless your personal property is a large number of gas cylinders on a large truck.

                          JTMcC.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                            OSHA and DOT regulations have no effect on a guy hauling personal property for personal reasons in a personal vehicle.

                            Unless your personal property is a large number of gas cylinders on a large truck.

                            JTMcC.
                            I agree with JT, In Canada if you are hauling 5 or more cylinders they must be standing and secured if you have 5 or less they may be laid down provided they are secured. Jef

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                            • #15
                              I agree, for the home crowd hauling a bottle no big deal, nothing to lose sleep over.

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