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  • #16
    Originally posted by Ls2cam View Post
    I copied from other post:
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...do-they-figure


    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...welding-basics here:

    1. Material thickness determines amperage. As a guideline, each 0.001 inch of material thickness requires 1 amp: 0.125 in. = 125 amps. For example: I have 3/16" (0.1875) thick metal flat.
    0.001 in.of material thickness x 0.1875= 0.0001875
    or
    0.125 in per amp x 0.1875= 0.0234 amps


    Is this makes sense?
    I am bigCONFUSED on amperage.
    Dude.

    Google "arithmetic."

    If you use one amp for every .001" thickness, then just move the decimal three places to the right.

    Or, just multiply the thickness of the metal (expressed in decimal inches) by 1,000.

    For example, for 1/16" material (.0625") you would use 62.5 amps.

    I'm not saying the rule of thumb is always right, just showing you how to move the decimal point.

    Next lesson, we'll talk about topological calculus.

    Good luck.

    Comment


    • #17
      Thanks to Helios

      As a guideline, each 0.001 inch of material thickness requires 1 amp: 0.125 in. = 125 amps.
      For example: I have 3/16" (0.1875) thick metal flat.
      125 in per amp x 0.1875= 23.4 amps


      4. Set the wire feed speed. Wire speed controls amperage, as well as the amount of weld penetration. A speed that's too high can lead to burn-through. If a manual or weld specification sheet is not available, use the multipliers in the following chart to find a good starting point for wire feed speed. For example, for 0.030-in. wire, multiply by 2 in. per amp to find the wire feed speed in inches per minute (IPM).

      125 in per amp x 0.1875= 23.4 amps

      1.6 in./amp X 23.4 = 37.44 IPM
      Got correct???
      MillerMatic 211

      Comment


      • #18
        Hey, why not try this:
        Go to the resources section of this site or stop in at your local Miller dealer and get some "Weld Calculators"....
        I understand that knowing the arithmetic is necessary but a lot of it is memory.
        Use those calculators and you'll be off and welding before you know it.
        Before long you'l memorize this stuff and have few issues.
        Measure twice, cut ONCE............

        MillerMatic 211
        MillerMatic 251
        Miller Dynasty 200 DX
        ESAB O/A Equipment

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        • #19
          ok I ll surf to resource to get some information..I am new with MM252. I did not realize that MM252 require a lot with adjustable setting. I had Lincoln 135 and 180 (its set up self-automatic) for years.

          Thanks
          MillerMatic 211

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          • #20
            Guess so I am slow learner.
            MillerMatic 211

            Comment


            • #21
              Don't worry dude, we've all been there.
              Get yourself a LOT of practice.
              Everything stated here is extremely valuable and take heed.
              Use whatever you need and get to welding.
              Experiment with the settings on different thicknesses of material.
              Adjust voltages and amperages MINUTELY to notice changes in penetration, bead width and profile. Don't forget travel speeds and stick-out lengths.
              I'm not trying to make this seem hard. You should be doing this on your own when you are ready. This will help your learning curve as well as increasing your knowledge. Have fun with this as well.
              Don't worry, you'll get it eventually. You're not gonna get it in one day or even one week.
              Keep at it, and good luck!
              Measure twice, cut ONCE............

              MillerMatic 211
              MillerMatic 251
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX
              ESAB O/A Equipment

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