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  • Stainless Job, pulser settings?

    I know, this is a really small repair job for all you experienced welders out there but other than building a small motorcycle with some ss rod in it, I have not welded stainless. Do not know the type of stainless and am just guessing on the thickness at this time.

    Got a call today from a sandwich shop. They broke a handle off one of their stainless steel pots. According to the TIG calculator if it is 3/32" I should use 90-120 amps dc with 11 chf argon and 1/4-3/8 ceramic or glass cup with a 1/16" tungsten. I only have orange band ceriated. Ordered some lanthanated but have not arrived yet. Maybe I need to wait.

    Plan on 308 filler with a gas lens.

    Have search all the forums for additional advise or settings. Some discussion on using some type of chamber for back gas. I could build out of cardboard or wood but it seams other threads don't mention that that has been used. Went to some other sites and watched some youtube stuff. Pipe was purged but watched several other flat stock jobs that didn't appear to be back gassed.

    I know about running fast and keeping it cool. I know about ss wirebrush as soon as you are done with the run. Read the bible on the tig process for stainless and it doesn't add anything the the tig calculator doesn't.

    Since I have a dynasty 350 I plan on using the pulser.

    Does anyone have and suggestions for pulser settings for this job.

    This type of information would be great in the dynasty settings thread.

    Thanks Leefy
    Last edited by Leefy; 08-12-2009, 06:24 PM.


    Dynasty 350 - My New Baby
    Millermatic 210 Mig with Spoolmate 3035
    Miller Thunderbolt XL 225/150 AC/DC Stick Welder
    Miller Specturm 625 Plasma Cutter
    Speedglas 9100 auto dark helmet
    Jackson auto dark helmet
    18.5 CFM Eagle Compressor
    Oxy/Act
    Horizontal Band Saw
    Dewalt 14" Chop Saw
    7 1/2 Dewalt Angle Grinder
    4 - 4 1/2" Sears Angle Grinders
    1 - 4" Makita Angle Grinder
    2 - IR Die Grinders
    All of which my wife says will be a "he$$ of a garage sale"

  • #2
    Originally posted by Leefy View Post
    I know, this is a really small repair job for all you experienced welders out there but other than building a small motorcycle with some ss rod in it, I have not welded stainless. Do not know the type of stainless and am just guessing on the thickness at this time.

    Got a call today from a sandwich shop. They broke a handle off one of their stainless steel pots. According to the TIG calculator if it is 3/32" I should use 90-120 amps dc with 11 chf argon and 1/4-3/8 ceramic or glass cup with a 1/16" tungsten. I only have orange band ceriated. Ordered some lanthanated but have not arrived yet. Maybe I need to wait.

    Plan on 308 filler with a gas lens.

    Have search all the forums for additional advise or settings. Some discussion on using some type of chamber for back gas. I could build out of cardboard or wood but it seams other threads don't mention that that has been used. Went to some other sites and watched some youtube stuff. Pipe was purged but watched several other flat stock jobs that didn't appear to be back gassed.

    I know about running fast and keeping it cool. I know about ss wirebrush as soon as you are done with the run. Read the bible on the tig process for stainless and it doesn't add anything the the tig calculator doesn't.

    Since I have a dynasty 350 I plan on using the pulser.

    Does anyone have and suggestions for pulser settings for this job.

    This type of information would be great in the dynasty settings thread.

    Thanks Leefy
    90 to 120 amps is way to much imo . I weld lots of ss and rarely exceed 75 amps.I'd forget back gassing something like this a waste of time imo. If it sugars through a little just hit the inside with a flapper wheel or something similiar.
    Dynasty 200DX "Blue Lightning"
    Bernard 3500ss water-cooler
    Rockwell vertical mill
    Beverly Shear B-3
    Beverly Shear JR
    Home-made English wheel
    Milwaukee Porta-band
    " Sawz-all
    Tennsmith 36" stomp shear
    Fixer upper 1968 Redface Lincoln sa200
    Powcon 300st

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with the previous suggestion. Try setting the machine for 65-75 amps max then control the puddle w/ the pedal. I don't know if I'd experiment with pulse settings on a weld that is that small and a project that's not mine. Sometimes it takes a little set-up/practice time with running the pulse settings to gat a feel for it and get your rhythm down.
      Pipefitters Local 72, Atlanta

      Comment


      • #4
        Leefy,

        Way "not enough information here".

        SS is "VERY" heat sensitive. You're asking for settings without even having determined the material/thickness you wish to weld.

        Any bozo can pull a number out of their azz and throw it out there, but I don't see where that's helping you at all.

        Get more info and we'll try to "dial you in". In the meantime, I'd suggest you attempt to get your hands on some scrap SS similar in thickness to what you'll be welding and practice.

        Also pick up some .045 and 1/16 filler. You're going to need some "little stuff" for this job.

        PS. 3/32" would be one dang heavy pot.
        Last edited by SundownIII; 08-12-2009, 06:51 PM.
        Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
        Dynasty 200 DX
        Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
        Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
        Hobart HH187
        Dialarc 250 AC/DC
        Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
        Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
        PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
        Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
        Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
        More grinders than hands

        Comment


        • #5
          I disagree with showdog, I would take the time to fixture something to back-gas the pot with. Like you said, very simple, such as a piece of cardboard. Do you want your work to be professional and get more referrals? If so, grinding out your mistakes on the inside of a cooking pot isn't the way to do it. As far as pulse, for something that small I wouldn't bother. I imagine the pot is very thin, maybe 22 gauge (?) so you are going to have to keep most of your heat on the much thicker handle to avoid burning through. About 2 weeks ago I got a call from the local Chili's Restaurant to repair a "Fry Dog", basically a very greasy SS pot on wheels that they empty their grease into, then wheel it out to where they dump it. The employees had tried to fix it using JB Weld, what a freakin', greasy mess! The manager delivered it to my house hoping to get it back the next day. I wire wheeled the JB out as best I could, set up a cardboard shield for back-gassing and welded up the crack. I had it fixed by the time she got back to the restaurant, so she turned right around to pick it up, very happy customer! Still holding on to a card good for 2 free dinners in addition to my repair charges! I'm sure next time they will bring it to me rather than messing around with JB!

          BTW, I welded this 22-24 gauge with .040 tungsten, .040 309 filler at 50 amps max setting, probably back peddled a bit.
          Last edited by nocheepgas; 08-12-2009, 06:58 PM.
          Miller Syncrowave 200
          Homemade Water Cooler
          130XP MIG
          Spectrum 375
          60 year old Logan Lathe
          Select Machine and Tool Mill
          More stuff than I can keep track of..

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
            Leefy,

            Way "not enough information here".

            SS is "VERY" heat sensitive. You're asking for settings without even having determined the material/thickness you wish to weld.

            Any bozo can pull a number out of their azz and throw it out there, but I don't see where that's helping you at all.

            Get more info and we'll try to "dial you in". In the meantime, I'd suggest you attempt to get your hands on some scrap SS similar in thickness to what you'll be welding and practice.

            Also pick up some .045 and 1/16 filler. You're going to need some "little stuff" for this job.

            PS. 3/32" would be one dang heavy pot.
            SundownIII

            Sorry, my mistake. When I pick up the piece I will get the thickness. It isn't a coffee pot but some type of lid on some huge cooker is what the woman described it as. Will post a followup after I know all the facts. Sorry for posting before I know. Know better next time


            Dynasty 350 - My New Baby
            Millermatic 210 Mig with Spoolmate 3035
            Miller Thunderbolt XL 225/150 AC/DC Stick Welder
            Miller Specturm 625 Plasma Cutter
            Speedglas 9100 auto dark helmet
            Jackson auto dark helmet
            18.5 CFM Eagle Compressor
            Oxy/Act
            Horizontal Band Saw
            Dewalt 14" Chop Saw
            7 1/2 Dewalt Angle Grinder
            4 - 4 1/2" Sears Angle Grinders
            1 - 4" Makita Angle Grinder
            2 - IR Die Grinders
            All of which my wife says will be a "he$$ of a garage sale"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nocheepgas View Post
              I disagree with showdog, I would take the time to fixture something to back-gas the pot with. Like you said, very simple, such as a piece of cardboard. Do you want your work to be professional and get more referrals? If so, grinding out your mistakes on the inside of a cooking pot isn't the way to do it. As far as pulse, for something that small I wouldn't bother. I imagine the pot is very thin, maybe 22 gauge (?) so you are going to have to keep most of your heat on the much thicker handle to avoid burning through. About 2 weeks ago I got a call from the local Chili's Restaurant to repair a "Fry Dog", basically a very greasy SS pot on wheels that they empty their grease into, then wheel it out to where they dump it. The employees had tried to fix it using JB Weld, what a freakin', greasy mess! The manager delivered it to my house hoping to get it back the next day. I wire wheeled the JB out as best I could, set up a cardboard shield for back-gassing and welded up the crack. I had it fixed by the time she got back to the restaurant, so she turned right around to pick it up, very happy customer! Still holding on to a card good for 2 free dinners in addition to my repair charges! I'm sure next time they will bring it to me rather than messing around with JB!
              We will agree to disagree . If you set your machine right you may not even get any sugar.I'm no hack welder by any means and I know the importance of back gassing . I weld alot of x-ray boiler tube[plenty of stainless] and know first hand forget to purge[stainless] and you got yourself a reject. If you got the time by all means do whatever it takes to do the job the best you can but for me I wouldn't put that much time into such a small repair when it's not a critical weld.Time is money and the more time it takes me the more money you pay me and I'd hate to watch someone choke when I hand them a ridiculous bill for such a small repair. JMO don't take it wrong.
              Dynasty 200DX "Blue Lightning"
              Bernard 3500ss water-cooler
              Rockwell vertical mill
              Beverly Shear B-3
              Beverly Shear JR
              Home-made English wheel
              Milwaukee Porta-band
              " Sawz-all
              Tennsmith 36" stomp shear
              Fixer upper 1968 Redface Lincoln sa200
              Powcon 300st

              Comment


              • #8
                Leefy,

                I do hope you realize I have your best interests in mind. Furthermore I have always called things as I see them. Never could spell the word tact.

                Are you sure you want to take on this project at your current level of experience?

                If MacDonalds can be sued for serving hot coffee, you could surely be sued if the handle broke off again and a worker was scalded with hot grease or water. I'd hate to see you get "taken to the cleaners" for trying to help someone out.

                The more I think about it, the more inclined I am to NOT offer advice on how to conduct this repair, considering that someone could really get hurt if things go wrong.
                Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                Dynasty 200 DX
                Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                Hobart HH187
                Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                More grinders than hands

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
                  Leefy,

                  Way "not enough information here".

                  SS is "VERY" heat sensitive. You're asking for settings without even having determined the material/thickness you wish to weld.

                  Any bozo can pull a number out of their azz and throw it out there, but I don't see where that's helping you at all.

                  Get more info and we'll try to "dial you in". In the meantime, I'd suggest you attempt to get your hands on some scrap SS similar in thickness to what you'll be welding and practice.

                  Also pick up some .045 and 1/16 filler. You're going to need some "little stuff" for this job.

                  PS. 3/32" would be one dang heavy pot.
                  I wasn't trying to tell him what amps to weld with I was just saying I rarely exceed 75 amps for any stainless tig welding. I hope you weren't pointing fingers when you said any bozo can pull a # outa there azz.Btw I agree with what your saying.
                  Dynasty 200DX "Blue Lightning"
                  Bernard 3500ss water-cooler
                  Rockwell vertical mill
                  Beverly Shear B-3
                  Beverly Shear JR
                  Home-made English wheel
                  Milwaukee Porta-band
                  " Sawz-all
                  Tennsmith 36" stomp shear
                  Fixer upper 1968 Redface Lincoln sa200
                  Powcon 300st

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
                    Leefy,

                    I do hope you realize I have your best interests in mind. Furthermore I have always called things as I see them. Never could spell the word tact.

                    Are you sure you want to take on this project at your current level of experience?

                    If MacDonalds can be sued for serving hot coffee, you could surely be sued if the handle broke off again and a worker was scalded with hot grease or water. I'd hate to see you get "taken to the cleaners" for trying to help someone out.

                    The more I think about it, the more inclined I am to NOT offer advice on how to conduct this repair, considering that someone could really get hurt if things go wrong.
                    I know that you are looking out for my interests here. I appreciate it. I will look at the lid tomorrow and see exactly what they are talking about. Then I can give all the information needed. I have been in business all of my life and product liability is always a big concern. I have a feeling that this is in fact just a lid for a pot. I'm sure that someone could sue over anything but again, I appreciate you telling like it is.

                    I don't want to start any pi$$ing matches over settings and who said what, so lets just leave it till I can follow up with "as Paul Harvey said, the rest of the story".


                    Dynasty 350 - My New Baby
                    Millermatic 210 Mig with Spoolmate 3035
                    Miller Thunderbolt XL 225/150 AC/DC Stick Welder
                    Miller Specturm 625 Plasma Cutter
                    Speedglas 9100 auto dark helmet
                    Jackson auto dark helmet
                    18.5 CFM Eagle Compressor
                    Oxy/Act
                    Horizontal Band Saw
                    Dewalt 14" Chop Saw
                    7 1/2 Dewalt Angle Grinder
                    4 - 4 1/2" Sears Angle Grinders
                    1 - 4" Makita Angle Grinder
                    2 - IR Die Grinders
                    All of which my wife says will be a "he$$ of a garage sale"

                    Comment


                    • #11


                      I wasn't pointing fingers at anybody.

                      If you go back and read many of my previous posts, you'll find that I'm not the least bit bashful about calling someone out.

                      When I "call someone out" they generally know it.
                      Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                      Dynasty 200 DX
                      Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                      Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                      Hobart HH187
                      Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                      Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                      Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                      PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                      Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                      Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                      More grinders than hands

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I used to use heavy aluminum foil for the purge patch taped on with duct tape or similar. Just make sure the tape is far enough away from where your going to weld.
                        mike sr

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here's a tip for tacking the pieces together or any other piece for that matter up to 14ga... Surprised this has not been mentioned... I'm not going to throw out amp settings for this but you want the setting somewhat hot...

                          Basically your are going to spot weld.... (Foot pedal only)

                          1. Have a nice sharpened tungsten
                          2. Position it at the joint resting on the material with no movement
                          3. Push the foot pedal down quick and release.

                          You should have a tack without any burn through... For small gaps you can stick filler rod or a piece of mig wire between the gap. For really thin guage you can use this method repeatedly for a small weld like a pot handle...

                          This method does not work with a hand control or I have yet to perfect or practice it on my Diversion 165... Just getting back into the swing of things after a 12 year hiatus...

                          Surprising welding is like riding a bike you never forget...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ok, I stopped at the business to inspect the broken lid. It was stainless, 3/32 as I had guessed, but not sure what type. It was an easy repair for most anyone but when I told them the price they said what?????? They had ordered a new one so didn't really need it fixed anyway. Now I know I'm going to catch he$$ from someone for the price I tried to get. I was going to charge $15 for it and they said no way, it isn't worth fixing.

                            Now I know, I shop in this store almost every day of the week and their prices are higher than any other store within a 25 mile radius. The reason I shop there is because they are the closest. But, $15 was too much. I don't figure you can turn on the machine and set up everything for that kind of money but I'm learning so thought it would be worth it to get the practice.

                            Oh well, it could have turned into another learning experience. Maybe next project will lead to some training. Appreciate all the help, and as SundownIII says, I will provide more information before I waste anyone's time.


                            Dynasty 350 - My New Baby
                            Millermatic 210 Mig with Spoolmate 3035
                            Miller Thunderbolt XL 225/150 AC/DC Stick Welder
                            Miller Specturm 625 Plasma Cutter
                            Speedglas 9100 auto dark helmet
                            Jackson auto dark helmet
                            18.5 CFM Eagle Compressor
                            Oxy/Act
                            Horizontal Band Saw
                            Dewalt 14" Chop Saw
                            7 1/2 Dewalt Angle Grinder
                            4 - 4 1/2" Sears Angle Grinders
                            1 - 4" Makita Angle Grinder
                            2 - IR Die Grinders
                            All of which my wife says will be a "he$$ of a garage sale"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Leefy,

                              Appreciate the update.

                              Be assured that not all people/businesses are like that. Many, in fact, are more than willing to pay above market rates to get back in service.

                              Bottom line, that's not the kind of business you need.
                              Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                              Dynasty 200 DX
                              Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                              Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                              Hobart HH187
                              Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                              Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                              Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                              PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                              Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                              Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                              More grinders than hands

                              Comment

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