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  • Mounting Fence Post

    Need a little help. Have to mount about eight metal fence post in Arizona, where it is usually fairly dry. Yuma to be exact. I have two ideal on how to do this. The fence post will be 2 to 2 1/2 inches square. One ideal is to mount it directly in cement. The other ideal is to weld a base at the bottom of the post. Than put threaded rods in the cement,and bolt the post to the threaded rod. Doing it this way will not look as good as putting the post directly in cement. I don't know what kind of reaction the metal will have being buried in the cement. Now what I am looking for is the best method to do this. You welders/fabricators may even have another way of doing this task. I am open for suggestions from any of you folks who have had experiance in this area.
    Lincoln Idealarc 250
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    Arnold

  • #2
    Hears A little talk

    If your a welder take some 1/2" x4"x4" flat bar and some rebar about 8 "to 10"
    make to L shaped bends in them have a welder or your self weld Two to the bottom and this is your base plate after you pour your holes settle the plates to your desired elv. This would take away the concrete corrosion issue...... My 10 cents anyway..

    Thanks .
    Denney
    www.denneywelding.com

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    • #3
      I don't think it really matters much in the corrosion department. Not down there anyway. Either the steel post rots off or the bolts rot off.

      The nice thing about the plate arrangement is it allows for a bit of leveling adjustment after the concrete sets up. Setting the posts in the concrete is quicker and easier if you can hold them straight while the concrete sets.

      Either way down there keep them slightly above the dirt line and you'll cut down on the corrosion factor.

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      • #4
        Sink 'em in concrete! No need to make things more complicated than they are.

        Just my thoughts
        jeffery

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        • #5
          All we do is dig an 18" deep by 6" diameter post hole, drop post in place, hold level, fill with concrete, tie off post while concrete dries, cut post to proper height and cap it after fence is built.
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          • #6
            Another option is to set the post in concrete and wrap the below ground portion that's in the concrete in pipe wrap that plumbers use on buried joints. Like this stuff: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00062WDHU/...0&linkCode=asn
            They should have it at Foxworth, Imperial, HD, or Lowes

            In all likelyhood, just burying it directly in concrete, it's gonna last longer than you!!!

            EDIT: What the **** are you doing in Yuma this time of the year anyway? Supposed to be in Maine in the summer, Yuma in the winter! Your snowbird clock is *** backwards! LOL
            Last edited by nocheepgas; 07-07-2009, 05:28 PM.
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            • #7
              I normally set them directly in the concrete. I wouldn't mess with the bolts. If you don't want to set them directly in the concrete, then set a plate like bdenny29 suggested. Are they bare or coated prior to setting? Powder coat or even paint will make them last longer.
              Jim

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              • #8
                paint the whole post and spray the inside as good as you can and just set in the crete. I placed one in cement 7yrs ago and its still good and it see's a lot of traffic. just my 2cents.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by strictlycarved View Post
                  paint the whole post and spray the inside as good as you can and just set in the crete. I placed one in cement 7yrs ago and its still good and it see's a lot of traffic. just my 2cents.
                  ya i did the same thing on my gates about 4 years ago
                  just cap the end, ruff um up primer and paint put um in cement


                  gary

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                  • #10
                    Using pre galvanized post instead of plain steel will make them last the longest. Powder coat, paint, or spray on galvanizing only coats the outside. Posts and tubes usually rust from the inside out, provided the outsides are kept painted. The pre galvanizing protects the inside as well as the outside. Also, cap the posts. Leaving the tops open causes them fill up with water.
                    Millermatic350P/Python, MillermaticReach/Q300
                    Millermatic175
                    MillermaticPassport/Q300
                    HTP MIG200
                    PowCon 300SM, MK Cobramatic
                    ThermalArc 185ACDC, Dynaflux Tig'r, CK-20
                    DialarcHF, Radiator-1
                    Hypertherm PowerMax 380
                    Purox oxy/ace
                    Jackson EQC
                    -F350 CrewCab 4x4
                    -LoadNGo utility bed
                    -Bobcat 250NT
                    -PassportPlus/Q300
                    -XMT304/Optima/Spoolmatic15A
                    -Suitcase8RC/Q400
                    -Suitcase12RC/Q300
                    -Smith oxy/propane
                    -Jackson EQC

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                    • #11
                      "Post-It Notes"

                      Originally posted by Maineiac View Post
                      Need a little help. Have to mount about eight metal fence post in Arizona, where it is usually fairly dry. Yuma to be exact. I have two ideal on how to do this. The fence post will be 2 to 2 1/2 inches square. One ideal is to mount it directly in cement. The other ideal is to weld a base at the bottom of the post. Than put threaded rods in the cement,and bolt the post to the threaded rod. Doing it this way will not look as good as putting the post directly in cement. I don't know what kind of reaction the metal will have being buried in the cement. Now what I am looking for is the best method to do this. You welders/fabricators may even have another way of doing this task. I am open for suggestions from any of you folks who have had experiance in this area.
                      2 ways to approach this. Dig your post holes, pour the mud, set "sole plates" on the top, when set and dried, weld your posts to the plate. This is usually done for handrails along loading docks, steps and stairs, etc. Even support posts are welded to plates that are secured to footing piers with "red-head" polts, then the "diamond cuts" are back filled with mud and finished even with the floor. Weld some re-bar pieces on the plate and then set it in the concrete.

                      Or, you can drill your holes, set your posts, backfill with mud (concrete). Trust me, it will be a long, long time before the lime in the concrete has any effect on the steel posts. I've poured so many post holes I can't even count them, from dairy farms to freeway signs.

                      You going to mix the mud yourself, or try and get some left over from redy mix? Rinker still has batch plants in Yuma, I worked for them for 10 years (When they were Kiewit), when you're ready to do it, call them and see if they have some left over, save you some aggrivation.

                      Which ever is easiest for you.

                      Dave
                      Last edited by davedarragh; 07-07-2009, 09:35 AM.
                      "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                      • #12
                        Why not use spray undercoating on the post below grade?
                        Nick
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                        • #13
                          In my area we don't bother to mix the cement. dig the hole, drop in the post, pour dry cement mix around the post, level the post up and tamp the cement tight. Moisture from the soil sets the cement right up and the dry mix holds the post tight in the mean time.
                          Weekend wannab racer with some welders.

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                          • #14
                            "Soil Moisture"

                            Originally posted by Vicegrip View Post
                            In my area we don't bother to mix the cement. dig the hole, drop in the post, pour dry cement mix around the post, level the post up and tamp the cement tight. Moisture from the soil sets the cement right up and the dry mix holds the post tight in the mean time.
                            You're in Virginia, this is Arizona.

                            Cement is only an ingredient, the finished product is "concrete."

                            Dave
                            "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                            • #15
                              Water---

                              Doubt you have a probelm with water by you, but when ever I mount a steel post I always drill drainage holes, so when the pipe fills with water it has somewhere to go!
                              Kevin
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