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  • "Fume Extraction"

    Check out Miller's Home Page. They are introducing a NEW fume extraction machine. Looks Good!

    Dave
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  • #2
    Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
    Check out Miller's Home Page. They are introducing a NEW fume extraction machine. Looks Good!

    Dave
    Lot of fumes at your place Dave?

    What sort of operations use these things? Stick / mig welding indoors?

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    • #3
      http://millerwelds.com/products/fumeextraction/filtair/

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      • #4
        Fume extraction/evacuation!

        Anyone even remotely concerned about their health......should be aware of the health risks involved wih any welding process.

        Everyone is familiar with google! Do yourself a favor and educate yourself on the risks involved with any kind of welding.

        Anyone welding inside should have one form or another of fume extraction.

        I have been using fume extraction combined with fresh air exchange for many years now. I use a portable unit and an extraction downdraft table.

        I have thousands of welding hours under my cap and a clean bill of health to boot!


        Cheers!

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        • #5
          Go get yourself some cheap plastic air sock, and tape it to a cheap turbine blower you can get a lowes, and walaa, you got yourself a fume extractor. No need to spend a ton of money on fume extractors, plus my way is more portable.
          If you want peace, be prepared for war!

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          • #6
            "Duct Tape: Here's To Your Health"

            Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
            Go get yourself some cheap plastic air sock, and tape it to a cheap turbine blower you can get a lowes, and walaa, you got yourself a fume extractor. No need to spend a ton of money on fume extractors, plus my way is more portable.
            usmcruz: Another "Wal Mart" Special? Lincoln's "Mini Flex" system weighs only 33#, contains longlife Hepa and carbon filters, is very portable, and meets OSHA Standards, which I seriously doubt, your creation does.
            Last edited by davedarragh; 05-15-2009, 09:01 AM.
            "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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            • #7
              "Plumes of Fumes"

              Originally posted by LewisCobb View Post
              Lot of fumes at your place Dave?

              What sort of operations use these things? Stick / mig welding indoors?
              I was glad to see Miller join the ranks of "Environmental Systems," as their major competitor (Lincoln) has had a variety of systems available for many years.

              It's important to note, past "Class Action" Law Suits, both litigated and pending, has brought an awarness to this industry in particular, regarding potential health risks/hazards and subsequent OSHA Compliance.

              Contributing Editor to "The Fabricator" (trade magazine), Vicki Bell, has a resourceful article related to these hazards.

              As Bubblemaker mentioned, google "welding fume hazards" and read documented cases of "metal fever" manganese poisoning, lung disease, Beryllium Disease (which I thought I had), and the many cancers associated with this industry.

              As with all trades, there are inherent risks, but in the metal working/welding industry, due to the variety of alloys and joining processes, health hazards are more prominent and shouldn't be taken lightly.

              Dave
              "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
                Go get yourself some cheap plastic air sock, and tape it to a cheap turbine blower you can get a lowes, and walaa, you got yourself a fume extractor. No need to spend a ton of money on fume extractors, plus my way is more portable.
                That all makes sense except for the part where the gas goes away form the weld. downdraft makes sense because it theoretically pull gas into the weld.
                MillerMatic 140 Auto-Set

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                • #9
                  What about for us hobby types that are tig welding in the garage ? Should I think about setting up some sort of "gentle" ventilation in there ? Maybe an exhaust fan that's pulling some fresh air in the garage and "exchanging" the air on a periodic basis? Leaving the garage doors open in the summer is an option I guess. Not so much of a breeze that it's blowing the argon away, but enough so any evil fumes of residue etc. are not lingering in the air in there?

                  I'd be interested to see what other hobby guys are using in this regard.

                  I don't tend to take this stuff lightly but like most weekenders I have to work within a budget (my wife would disagree with that statement ).

                  Reminds me of the general awareness of the hazards of dust in woodworking that has been taking place these last few years for the hobbyists. Turns out, the dust levels in a hobby shop are multiples higher than in most industries as they tend to exhaust the fine dust (micro level particles) to the outside where hobby guys are working in a closed shop and don't exhaust to the outside in the norther climates as it would drive the heating bills sky high. There are some excellent solutions - even for the DIY guys that have appeared in the last few years - some are even free plans that can built yourself. I'm in the process of collecting the items for mine at the moment.

                  I'm starting to envision how I could set up a little ventilation in the garage for my tig follies the more that I think about it. Too bad I am barely able to stand at the moment due to coming down with the flu, or I'd be out in the garage with the tape measure.

                  Cheers,
                  Lewis

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                  • #10
                    "Venting, Frustrations"

                    Originally posted by LewisCobb View Post
                    What about for us hobby types that are tig welding in the garage ? Should I think about setting up some sort of "gentle" ventilation in there ? Maybe an exhaust fan that's pulling some fresh air in the garage and "exchanging" the air on a periodic basis? Leaving the garage doors open in the summer is an option I guess. Not so much of a breeze that it's blowing the argon away, but enough so any evil fumes of residue etc. are not lingering in the air in there?

                    I'd be interested to see what other hobby guys are using in this regard.

                    I don't tend to take this stuff lightly but like most weekenders I have to work within a budget (my wife would disagree with that statement ).

                    Reminds me of the general awareness of the hazards of dust in woodworking that has been taking place these last few years for the hobbyists. Turns out, the dust levels in a hobby shop are multiples higher than in most industries as they tend to exhaust the fine dust (micro level particles) to the outside where hobby guys are working in a closed shop and don't exhaust to the outside in the norther climates as it would drive the heating bills sky high. There are some excellent solutions - even for the DIY guys that have appeared in the last few years - some are even free plans that can built yourself. I'm in the process of collecting the items for mine at the moment.

                    I'm starting to envision how I could set up a little ventilation in the garage for my tig follies the more that I think about it. Too bad I am barely able to stand at the moment due to coming down with the flu, or I'd be out in the garage with the tape measure.

                    Cheers,
                    Lewis
                    Lewis: Sure hope you're not coming down with the H1N1 (swine) Flu. There are many designs, comfortably within budget, that are practical and functional. Take some time to familiarize yourself with different layouts that would best suit your needs. As woodworking particulates cause respiratory irritations, welding fumes and gases DISPLACE breathable air. Do you have any acquaintances in the HVAC Industry? I'm sure an affordable, functional design can be reached to serve both your woodworking/welding needs.

                    Get well soon.

                    Dave
                    Last edited by davedarragh; 05-15-2009, 09:32 AM.
                    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                      Lewis: Sure hope you're not coming down with the H1N1 (swine) Flu. There are many designs, comfortably within budget, that are practical and functional. Take some time to familiarize yourself with different layouts that would best suit your needs. As woodworking particulates cause respiratory irritations, welding fumes and gases DISPLACE breathable air. Do you have any acquaintances in the HVAC Industry? I'm sure an affordable, functional design can be reached to serve both your woodworking/welding needs.

                      Get well soon.

                      Dave

                      Dave -
                      A ventilation buddy is something that I have not been able to acquire yet. I have machnists, fabricators, etc. that I have done electronics work for over the years but no ventilation guys yet.

                      The woodworking dust collection system is pretty much all designed and I have some of the pieces already. it's in a separate room from my garage and is dedicated to woodworking - the garage is where I'll be doing all my welding so I will have to come up with something in there specifically for that. I'm thinking a little hood over the bench with the pipe running up into the attic and out the side of the house like a dryer vent might work - again - just for tig work - not stick. I'd have to insulate the pipe so it does not "sweat" in the the wintertime or when it's much colder in the attic than in the garage, but that's not a big deal.

                      Actually, now that I think about it - I have a carpenter buddy that is friends with a guy that owns a HVAC place. "6 degrees of separation" at work again. Will call him on the weekend and see if he can hook me up.

                      This flu is starting to get better from yesterday I think - probably not swine flu - there were only 2 cases of it in my province here in Canada anyway and they were in other cities. I think the people recovered quickly as well. Still, I am getting tired with people laughing at me when I start talking to them on the phone. I called the welding service center about the machine in the shop this morning and when the guy realized who it was that was calling he burst into laughter.....

                      Cheers,
                      Lewis

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                      • #12
                        "Laughter, The Best medicine"

                        Lewis: Glad to hear you're feeling better. 3M makes an excellent welding respirator for welding, metal working, and painting.

                        MMM6200 (medium) or MMM6300 (large) used with Welding Fume Filter # MMM2097, provides excellent protection as well. Together, about $20.

                        Best $20 one can spend.

                        Not knowing the "lay out" of your shop, and living in a Northern Climate, I can't really recommend a "system." Here in the arrid Southwest desert, things can be done differently. I'm sure your FOAF, (friend of a friend), can simplify an adequate ventilation system.

                        Get well, and enjoy your weekend.

                        Dave
                        "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                          Lewis: Glad to hear you're feeling better. 3M makes an excellent welding respirator for welding, metal working, and painting.

                          MMM6200 (medium) or MMM6300 (large) used with Welding Fume Filter # MMM2097, provides excellent protection as well. Together, about $20.

                          Best $20 one can spend.

                          Not knowing the "lay out" of your shop, and living in a Northern Climate, I can't really recommend a "system." Here in the arrid Southwest desert, things can be done differently. I'm sure your FOAF, (friend of a friend), can simplify an adequate ventilation system.

                          Get well, and enjoy your weekend.

                          Dave
                          Thanks Dave - I'll make a note of those numbers and see what I can find around here.

                          As to the layout of my garage - there is none at the moment - welder in the middle of the floor - wire strealing across to the plug in the wall, a couple of sawhorses and a piece of plywood, with a couple of fire bricks and a 12" square of 3/16 as my "table" - haha. It's pretty decent weather here lately so I have had the garage doors open, but on one occasion when I did not, I re-entered the garage and it smelled like a fab shop to me, so some ventilation will be required I guess.

                          Cheers,
                          Lewis

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                          • #14
                            Fume Extraction

                            At work we are in the process of building a new plant. We recognized the need for fume extraction in the maintenance shop, but they had poured a concrete pad over the top of the shop. I ended up finding a FRED Jr. extractor at my local welding supplier.

                            http://www.diversitech.ca/collectors/fume_dust.asp

                            I bought it for about the same price as I could have installed an exhaust fan for, and it has the advantage of taking 120V, making it portable around the plant. So far, the guys using it really like it.

                            At home, I use a dust/mist mask whenever cutting or welding, and notice a huge difference in my nose which tells me it is reasonably effective. Having said that, I woul dnot mind adding some ventilation, along with insulation, to the garage.
                            Diversion 165
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                            '97 Triumph Trophy 900 (3 cylinder, hence Triple!)

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                            • #15
                              Fume extraction

                              For my home shop i installed the cheapest stove hutch in the store that vents outside,removed the filter and replaced it with an aluminium ventilation pipe to match the size of the fan.This allows the hutch to pick-up from closer to the weld(but not too close as to mess with shielding gas).On top of that,i wear a 3M respirator with P100 filters and most of all i dont smoke,Frank.And please,although things get hot in the shop,dont expose your skin to UV.Wear long sleeves and button up.
                              Last edited by Frank Motoweld; 05-17-2009, 10:38 AM. Reason: update
                              Millermatic 252
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