Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

First Practice TIG Beads Submitted For Advice

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • First Practice TIG Beads Submitted For Advice

    Well, here's a selection of my first practice TIG beads on 1/8" steel I did today. The set up used was Dynasty 200 with foot pedal - set 130 amps maximum, 3/32 2% Ceriated Tungsten, and 3/32 filler. They are not in order of doing them - I sort of lost track of what was what in the excitement I guess. I numbered them for reference if some of you kind experts can pass along tips and suggestions.

    Thanks !
    Lewis





  • #2
    Looks like youre getting the hang of it Lewis...............

    I just tried mine on aluminum, 3/16 material, did a nice job.

    mike sr
    mike sr

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Lewis. Looks like you have a reasonable grasp of what you are doing. Some of your beads appear a little hot, but you will get a large improvement in appearance if you work on the obvious variation in travel speed. Concentrate on keeping the entire bead the same width.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Lewis

        Beads look ok . You definitely understand the proceedure . You might want to try reversing your direction and reducing the heat gradually as you come to the end of your bead to fill in the crater . Rob
        Miller MM252 with Bernard Q300
        Hypertherm PM30

        Comment


        • #5
          I thought it might be a little too slow or hot in some cases - number 5 and number 20 for example - there seems to be no ridges at all.

          I did notice that I was really tapping the filler in quickly maybe 2 times a second as I ran these beads. I was watching the puddle and more specifically the leading edge to try and make sure it remained wet and flowing rather than cooling and shrinking in width. Not sure if that's the correct procedure or not, but seemed to help me.

          I wonder if I was to reduce the heat - say from 130 to about 110 or so and if that would force me to "slow down" the travel and dip rate of the filler? I suppose then the ridges would be spaced a bit futher apart as well.

          There seems to be so many variables that you are trying to keep track of in your head at the same time. I pretty much had the pedal slammed full down most of the time - mainly because I forgot about it once I got the bead going reasonable well- hehe. I guess the more comfortable you get, the more you can think about other things and I can start to experiment with backing off the pedal and throttling it more as I am running a bead.

          Thanks for the assistance fellows. it's great to have a forum like this when you are trying to pick up a skill that ideally requires someone looking over your shoulder.

          I'm pretty much out of practice matieral now so might have to take a break until the first of the week. Just as well - the lawn's not fertilized, bushes are not cleaned up after the winter, the porch chairs are not removed from storage, the snowblower is not stored for the summer and the lawnmower has not been taken out ...... welding is much more fun than those things ...

          Cheers,
          Lewis

          Comment


          • #6
            "TIG Beads"

            Hey Lewis: Glad to see you finally got 'er up and running! You're going to do just fine. Actually, now that you've run all of those, weld them all together and make a "cube." That will give you a chance to do some "outside corner" welds, until you can get some more material. If you've got some of the real small welding magnets, it makes it a lot easier with small stuff.

            You can practice your "throttle" (heat control) and make a perfect "Lewis Cube"

            Your Dynasty book may have different settings than the Miller GTAW Calculator, but IT says, for outside corner welds:

            1/16" tungsten electrode (probably orange for your machine)

            1/4 - 3/8 cup orfice dia.

            3/32 filler rod (R70S-2)

            DC

            85-120 amps

            11 cfh for the argon

            These values are based on SS, and Miller recommends 10% higher settings for mild steel.

            These are good "benchmarks" to get you going.

            It's easy to "blow" through outside corners, so ease into them, dabbing the rod, and you'll be surprised with your results.

            Keep us posted.

            Dave
            "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

            Comment


            • #7
              Dave -
              I never thought of that "weld the pieces together" idea - I have been so fixated on trying to run beads that once I didn't have a piece of steel to do that I assumed I was out of business. I'll be donning the work clothes and heading into the garage shortly to check out my outside corner skills

              Stay tuned
              Lewis

              Comment


              • #8
                "Boxed In"

                Originally posted by LewisCobb View Post
                Dave -
                I never thought of that "weld the pieces together" idea - I have been so fixated on trying to run beads that once I didn't have a piece of steel to do that I assumed I was out of business. I'll be donning the work clothes and heading into the garage shortly to check out my outside corner skills

                Stay tuned
                Lewis
                If your a real brave hombre, practice some fillets (inside corner welds) before you weld the two "roof tops" together. Before you know it, you'll have used up all your rods!

                Dave
                "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Those craters can go all the way thru on purge welded tubing, speeding up and/or reducing the current at the end of the weld while maintaining travel will fix this, takes a bit of getting used to.

                  I never had a machine with foot control on the job so it had to be controlled with the rate of travel at the end of the weld. I am refering to fusion welds, no filler used.

                  You will find when you get to where the welding is automatic (not thinking about every move) they will really improve.
                  You are definitely getting there thats for sure!
                  mike sr
                  Last edited by popspipes; 05-10-2009, 04:52 PM.
                  mike sr

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dave -
                    I'm not sure I'll listen to your advice any more - those inside corner welds are impossible I end up seeming to glob the filler on one side of the corner or the other and have a hard time "bridging" the corner. I did manage it once, and then started to tap my way along with the filler but only managed about 1/2" travel before things all went off the rails again. My respect for you folks that do this and make it look so easy increases exponentially with each session for me let me tell you.

                    I went back to the beads for a bit on the few spare corners of scraps I had, and noticed that I was starting to glob through on the opposite side of the metal - is this ok in normal practice? I mean it looks like I'm getting full penetration for sure.

                    One corner I tried was an outside corner - witout the edges overlapping - so I had a little trough of sorts to weld into. Placing it so it was horizontal and then tapping along I managed to make a decent looking join. I guess you could call it my first successful weld of 2 pieces of metal. I turned the amps back beforehand based on your advice and it worked.....oh, alright, I'll keep listening to you I guess

                    Oh yes - I switched to a 1/16 tungsten tonight for all my tinkering. Same 125 amps max - looks like from the manual I could ram the current up to 160 amps with this tungsten but I kept it around 125. (2% ceriated). Seemed to be a bit more focused for my untrained eyes. Still made many trips to the grinder though. I'm starting to recognize when I get contact and there's a little "flash" at the tip of the tungsten

                    Sure is fun. Evern better when I succeed at something.

                    That's it for this weekend - I'll be back with more questions and pics hopefully in a few days.

                    Thanks to everyone for the assistance and advice.

                    Cheers,
                    Lewis

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Practice!

                      Practice!

                      Practice!


                      And then


                      Practice!

                      Practice!


                      Practice!


                      I think you get what I'm saying!


                      Looks OK!


                      But don't forget....


                      Practice!


                      Good luck with the cube!

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X