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How much to charge for small welding jobs

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  • Sapient
    replied
    Well I do alot of side work for family and friends and i charge a flat rate for equipment and a hourly rate similar to the tickets I turn in at work. hourly rate is approx 23.50 , O/a is a 12.00 charge, Chop saw is 10.00, and i would charge a rig fee but for side jobs i charge a 4 hour min ive been burned one too many times not to.

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  • Bodybagger
    replied
    Originally posted by diamondback View Post

    Think of the quality triangle. Good, Fast, Cheap. Pick 2.
    I'm amazed at the number of people out there that expect 3 and get 1, or even zero.

    Leave a comment:


  • diamondback
    replied
    I really struggle with this question when it comes up. I don't mind telling a guy how to do something, but I am not usually willing to tell him how to make money at it. You guys that shared your pricing are giving insights into your way of making money at it. Yes pricing is probably in the public domain but calling a shop to see what they charge with no intention of using them but in fact to undermine their price to me is underhanded unless you were up front with them to start with and told them you were going to be their competition.

    I would also be very careful about saying that so and so company down the street charges X amount for their work. This will lead you to checking their rates weekly and adjusting yours. I just don't see how it is a good practice.

    Instead nail down your process and procedures. Make sure your the best you can be and figure out what the fair price is according to what you do. Saying that I will charge 40 bucks because they charge 45 is going to drive some shady deals your way. IF your the best value then honest people will bring their business. It also tends to shield you from the "oh it will just take a minute" crowd, not completely but a lot of the time.

    I don't think I would want to be the cheapest welder in town, look at the reputation that the cheapest in town have and their clientèle. What I would want to be is the best value, the best welder for the price paid and build my reputation on quality instead of price.

    Think of the quality triangle. Good, Fast, Cheap. Pick 2.

    Just my opinion

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  • Bodybagger
    replied
    The simple answer is that you need to charge a fee that corresponds to everything you've put into the job plus a reasonable earning for yourself.

    To figure out what what you actually have into a job, you have to sit down and do the math. Add it all up without forgetting anything. If you have 2,000 hours and $5,000 in your education, you need to figure that in as well.

    There are people who do this. They are called accountants. Have a sit-down with one and in about 1 hour they can get you straight. They'll think of things you never would have thought of.

    Just keep in mind that guys who maintain contractors licenses, insurance, workers comp, and qualification certificates as well as pay local, state, and federal taxes are very upset when a guy comes along taking their jobs without paying the same dues.

    People throw around a lot of trash talk about illegal immigrants. I haven't seen a single illegal immigrant running an undocumented portable welding setup, but I have seen dozens of Americans running undocumented portable welding setups.

    It doesn't matter what country you come from, if you do 1 job per year or 1000 jobs per year, if you don't pay taxes, social security, and legitimate buisiness expenses, you are an illegal worker and you are taking someone's job.

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  • st clair and sons welding
    replied
    hourly wage..

    the above post has been the best break down so far. To add to his i would factor a $1 increase in fuel expense if you are running gas powered welders

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  • 1havnfun
    replied
    I have owned my own mfg company for about 15 years now. what to charge is based on many factors.
    Here's the nuts and bolts for me.
    friends - FREE, they do for me and I do for them.
    Walkins, non professional - $40 min and $40/hr + material with mark up
    Walkins, professional - $65 min and $65/hr + material with mark up
    if it is an actual bid situation. i break the job down and bid to make $65/hr min. Material is marked up to what the market will bear.
    Bid to get 30% to 50% of the work you bid, if you are trying to get 100% you will find that you are working way hard for the money.

    This all takes alot practice, no body is a master right away. start on the low side to start getting work then adjust your prices up until you are comfortable.

    What is your hourly rate? This is based on the following factors.
    rent/month
    what does it cost to have you equipment/month
    electric bill/month
    phone bill/month
    employees/month
    add these up and divide by 160(hrs/month)

    Now add what you want to make each hour(your salary) and add this to the number you just got from your expenses
    THAT IS YOUR MINIMUM HOURLY RATE!!!!

    With a little luck you can afford to stay in business

    good luck in your business

    Leave a comment:


  • nfinch86
    replied
    Job Rates !

    Originally posted by m.k.swelding View Post
    One place I use to work befor I went out on my own they got $120hr. now me being on my own I get $85hr. portable welding + 75 cents a mile travle.
    Hi Guys;

    I charge $65.00 an Hr., But My time starts when I leave My Shop and the Price of Material( 50% mark-up on My Price ) If My cost is $1.00Lb., I Charge
    $1.50 Lb. for any Steel that I Purchase for the Job !!!

    ............. Norm

    Leave a comment:


  • m.k.swelding
    replied
    One place I use to work befor I went out on my own they got $120hr. now me being on my own I get $85hr. portable welding + 75 cents a mile travle.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyrtnow
    replied
    many thanks to all the replies

    Thanks you to all the replies, as usual there is so many differant ways of looking at things. I like everyones replies and answers. I did call around my area to get shop rates for welding they range from 45.00 to 80.00 an hour, and general machine work 45.00 to 65.00 hr . So I will probably charge around 40.00 Hr for tig welding. And 30.00 Hr for other welding. Machine work I will probably charge 35.00 Hr . I also wrote down all the prices for all the welding shops that I called. I will keep them handy to show people. I don't want to get rich off people, but I would like to pay for my Equipment and materials that I use. Thanks again for all the replies and Ideas. John

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  • allessence
    replied
    Was it Henry Ford who said "Time is money"?

    I look at it this way. How much does the person whom is asking to have the item fixed or fabbed would get paid? What does this person do for a living?

    In a previous life I did Blacksmithing work full time and spent years just learning the skills to make it viable (learning and working at it for 10-15 years before actually attempting to make a living at it).

    And what I found is no one knows how much work goes into something other than you. Since they don't understand the level of work nor the resources needed to get the job done. They figure $10.00 is to much. Though they make 50.00-150.00per hour.

    I found the high dollar types of people the most difficult to work for and after being in business for 20 years closed up the Blacksmithing shop because I was burnt out. Not with the work, but the people. 1 good customer in 5 isn't worth the time.

    So, charge what you need to to make a decent living. I get 65.00 Hr in shop and 75.00Hr out.

    According to the business class I took, when you figure out what a normal person gets (vacation time, sick time, design time, actual working time, phones, retirement, insurance, travel, etc) the formula was like 175.00 an hour in today market. And this was just squeaking by.

    By the way I know some guys making 150.00 Hr doing fences and gates. straight out.

    Leave a comment:


  • GerryR
    replied
    Seems the more you do for free, the more people expect you to do, for free. There are certain "friends" that just grease you with compliments just to get more for free. I'm not in your area but I charge $45. per hour for my services. "That which is done for nothing is worth nothing," is an old saying which rings true today. I don't mind helping the truely needy but there is no end to the users that are around. If I ever ask a friend or relative for help, I always offer to pay and I can't recall anyone ever refusing to accept the money! Charge for your services, even if it is a modest sum.

    Leave a comment:


  • fjk
    replied
    "Fleebernated Snorkernut"

    Originally posted by davedarragh
    Frank: How'd you know I needed one fixed?
    I work for the NSA (National Snorkernut Agency) and we know everything


    frank

    Leave a comment:


  • ridesideways
    replied
    I live by the principle: "Never do anything for family/friends that you aren't willing to do for free-- including loaning money." If I loan money to someone, I start out expecting not to be repaid. That said, I weld everything for free, because welding is a fun hobby.

    I welded two kitchen spoons together for one guy because we thought it would be funny to put it in the silverware draw at the office.

    Leave a comment:


  • Big_Eddy
    replied
    Do you warrant your work? Are you insured? Do you pay taxes on the earnings? Do you want to do these jobs, or would you rather be fishing / fixing your car / playing with the kids or grandkids? Do you need the money?

    To me - the question is too wide open. I don't weld for money. I'll do the odd job for a good friend, but when friends of friends ask, I tell them to take it to a professional. I don't have enough spare time as it is, and what I do have I would rather spend doing what I want to do. Plus I don't want the headaches of trying to fix others peoples stuff.

    That said - if I was to weld for money - I would calculate what my true cost to weld was, taking into account material costs, equipment costs, overhead costs, and a reasonable hourly rate for my labour. I would then compare that to the going rate in the area, and decide if I wanted to be a cut-rate or a premium cost welder. With both pieces of info, I could establish the rate that I want to charge, as well as any minimum charges. Last thing you want to do is set a rate that is too low, losing money on every job yet turning away business because you're too busy.

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  • swamp donkey
    replied
    I personally think it all depends on what your doing... Any job for direct family i charge nothing. Close relatives/ freinds usually still nothing or a case of beer type of deal usually its alot of fun and thats payment enough.
    For everything else all i do is just charge them my regular wage as welder and times that by 1.5. At least thats what me and some of my other welding freinds do. I figure it makes sence cause its on my free time or after my regular hours of work so i would treat it like im makin time and a half at work. Its still a little more reasonable than to get an actual welding shop at $60.00/hr or so to do it

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