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My Dinasty 200 has trouble starting.

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  • My Dinasty 200 has trouble starting.

    Hey, it's my first time using this forum.

    My shop's Dinasty200 has trouble starting.
    It first started bugging about a year ago. When I turn it on, I hear it ''hum'' but the read-out doesn't turn on. Usually all I have to do is turn it off, wait for the humming to die down and turn it on again, this usually does the trick.

    I've been able to live with it, but in the past week I've had to flicker it on and off for 15+ minutes to get it to start.

    I've changed the high-frequency card once and received great service from the Miller crew who bent over backwards to get the part here in canada within 2 days!

    Hopefully, someone can light my candle!

    Thanks,

    -Gabo

  • #2
    Do you move the machine around alot. What generally happens to these machines even if you don't move it around is the plastic strain relief connector on the primary cord going into the machine bites into the cable over time and quickly bites into it if you move the machine from place to place. This either breaks one or more of the primary cables or causes enough "noise" to make your machine not start up, or run very erratic.

    Seldom does the machine's primarys go phase to phase killing your breaker.

    What I do on the thousand or so rental fleet machines we inspect is remove that plastic strain relief all together and install a sleeved 3/4x3/4 metal version. This method will never break are harm the primary cables. We went from 200 + broken machines/ yr to 2 or 3 /yr just because of this minor change.

    You'll see the severly sqished primary cable when you remove that strain relief.

    In order to remove the lock and housing for the old strain relief, you have to use a hammer and flat flade screw driver to break the back of the strain relief as it's next to impossible to back off the strain relief nut. One whack just ahead of the strain relief nut and out it comes.

    It's best to cut the cable before the damage and reinstall it into the machine as it went in.


    Sure did cut down on my income when I figured out what was happening to these machines.

    Oh well..........
    Last edited by cruizer; 04-20-2009, 02:29 PM.

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    • #3
      thanks!

      The machine has been moved a couple of times to various events (we're a bicycle frame manufacturer and we do welding demos at races and trade shows) but that is mostly 5-10 times a year.

      The Primary cable theory makes senses, though. The cable routing through the cart is pretty tight.

      Thanks again for the imput!

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