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  • #16
    Time Zones ?

    Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
    Norm: Thank you for the kind words, maybe something I should consider when I retire? (What's that?)

    Actually, Arizona does not change to "Daylight Saving Time" in the summer. Only the Northeast portion of the State, which is the "Navajo Nation," and Soveriegn Tribal land overlapping the "4 Corners" region changes time. So, in the Summer, we are the same as LA and Las Vegas, and in the winter, we are the same as Phoenix, wait, we are Phoenix!

    I have a bastian of atomic clocks and weather instruments that need reset every spring and fall, as most of them do not recognize Arizona's Summer Time. (Basically Hot)

    Isn't New Foundland or Nova Scotia 1/2 hour different from the Atlantic Time Zone? Now that, would really take some getting used to.

    Dave

    Hi Dave;

    Yes, Newfoundland is 1/2 Hr. Later than Atlantic Time Zone !
    When It's 12:00 Noon here in Ontario ( EDT.) It's 1:00 PM. Atlantic Time Zone, and 1:30 PM. in Newfoundland. I think we here in Canada have Two More Time Zones than you have in the U.S.A. ?

    Yes Dave You would be an exellent Teacher !!!

    Your Canadian Friend, ......... Norm
    www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

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    • #17
      Originally posted by nfinch86 View Post
      Hi Dave;

      Yes, Newfoundland is 1/2 Hr. Later than Atlantic Time Zone !
      When It's 12:00 Noon here in Ontario ( EDT.) It's 1:00 PM. Atlantic Time Zone, and 1:30 PM. in Newfoundland. I think we here in Canada have Two More Time Zones than you have in the U.S.A. ?

      Yes Dave You would be an exellent Teacher !!!

      Your Canadian Friend, ......... Norm
      nope, 6 each... or were you talking about the lower 48?
      Bobcat 225NT
      Cutmaster 52
      Lincoln Weld-Pak 100 buzz box
      Caterpillar TH63
      '07 Kawasaki ZZR600

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      • #18
        i sometimes just point the rod up and just push the weld puddle without a weaving motion.

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        • #19
          Aus friend

          Well Davo now you have a mate down in australia, i'm down south in melbourne, as i'm just learning and have been thrown in the deep end by my boss in regards to welding work, i'm glad you blokes are out there to help me and people like that are giving it a go. Thanks Andy...........

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          • #20
            Au vs. Az

            Andy: Glad you found the "Forum." It's a lot of fun.

            I've got a couple of product guides from welding.au.com

            I'm going to familiarize myself with your "austarc" and "austmig" line of consumables so I can speak your language.

            WIA and Miller are featured. Is WIA your most popular, "domestic" brand?

            Stay in touch with us and keep us posted of your progress.

            Wishing you and your family a Happy Easter, "mate."

            Dave
            "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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            • #21
              aus weld

              Ok dave, WIA is the preferd rod for the pro's and esab rod's a close second, as i'm in the building game i speek to, watch and notice what they use and as best i can and how they go about it with out getting under there feet, if your wondering how i came about my name midseries i'm 70% through restoring a 65 [midseries corvette], allright big dave, hope to here from you later. Andy..ps, cig and boc are by far the most popular domestic brand here......
              Last edited by midseries; 04-12-2009, 09:30 PM. Reason: forgot stuff

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              • #22
                The 6013 is not the best choice for a person to learn vertical up either.
                Get some 6010 or 6011 and I think it will be easier for you to learn.
                The 7018 has a lot of flux on it, and it was tough for me to run up hand, I was never profiecent with it!
                I liked the Lincoln rod 6010 or 5P, the 6011 has a bit different flux on it and it didnt read the same to me, the end results were the same though.
                The name of the game is practice though, there is no substitute for that.........
                I thought 6013 was the ac dc version of 6012?? That rod had a clay flux on it, was a good flat rod.

                mike sr
                mike sr

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                • #23
                  Midseries, nfinch has given you great advice, follow it and you will be fine. This tecnique is what is used in the best shipbuilding welding schools.

                  Good luck
                  Wheelchair

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                  • #24
                    CigWeld

                    Originally posted by midseries View Post
                    Ok dave, WIA is the preferd rod for the pro's and esab rod's a close second, as i'm in the building game i speek to, watch and notice what they use and as best i can and how they go about it with out getting under there feet, if your wondering how i came about my name midseries i'm 70% through restoring a 65 [midseries corvette], allright big dave, hope to here from you later. Andy..ps, cig and boc are by far the most popular domestic brand here......
                    Andy: Ironically, someone had a post regarding a Cigweld TIG 180 about a month or so ago.

                    Thinking they were up by Brisbane or maybe Sidney, I'd have to find the post.


                    Dave
                    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                    • #25
                      "Rods & Reels"

                      Originally posted by popspipes View Post
                      The 6013 is not the best choice for a person to learn vertical up either.
                      Get some 6010 or 6011 and I think it will be easier for you to learn.
                      The 7018 has a lot of flux on it, and it was tough for me to run up hand, I was never profiecent with it!
                      I liked the Lincoln rod 6010 or 5P, the 6011 has a bit different flux on it and it didnt read the same to me, the end results were the same though.
                      The name of the game is practice though, there is no substitute for that.........


                      I thought 6013 was the ac dc version of 6012?? That rod had a clay flux on it, was a good flat rod.

                      mike sr
                      popspipes: 6010's are cellulose-sodium electrodes. The gas shield contains CO2 & Hydrogen gas, as reducing agents, that tend to produce the "digging" arc and deep penetration. DC+

                      6011's are cellulose-potassium, that provides an ionization of the arc making it suitable, but not limited to AC. "Hard to learn, easy to use."

                      6012's are rutile-sodium (titanium dioxide) and has a relatively low arc votage, high depostion, and low penetration. Used primarily on DC-

                      6013's are rutile-potassium, and as with 6011's, the potassium provides for arc ionization and stabilization suitable, but not limited to AC welding. Instructors generally use this for first time students due it's soft arc and is "Easy to learn, hard to use."

                      Then there is Lo-Hi sodium, potassium, iron powder, iron oxide sodium, iron oxide powder with multiple suffixes. The most common are E7018 H4R. Iron powder flux with maximum diffusible hyrdogen of 4ml per 100 grams.

                      Stainless steel electrodes are also the lo-hydrogen type. (Red Baron, Blue Max)

                      Hope this helps

                      Dave
                      "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                      • #26
                        Thanks for the info Dave......

                        mike sr
                        mike sr

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Bert View Post
                          Bert,
                          I am not too good with explanations ha! I can show a person how to do it , explanation of the procedure is another matter.........
                          I get the puddle going then whip up to cool it a bit, then come back down to the puddle and deposit material, I hesitate then whip the arc up and let the puddle cool a bit then repeat.
                          The metal is deposited on the down stroke but stacks up in the verrtical direction on top of the puddle......... clear as mud ???

                          mike sr
                          mike sr

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                          • #28
                            Ok, cool...that's what I do too. Your first explanation sounded more like you were welding with some kind of alphabet weave (I was being polite), going downhill, since I haven't been around welding that many years (though taugt by a few of them), I thought maybe there was this "old school" technique (though I TOTALLY didn't agree with it)....2nd....MUCH better
                            I'm not late...
                            I'm just on Hawaiian Time

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                            • #29
                              The people in the U.S. recomending different rods need to keep in mind that 6013 is used by the thousands of (metric) ton every day in the UK (and several countries that follow the UK model like Australia, New Zealand, etc, etc).
                              They weld pressure piping with those rods and have for decades.
                              So, recomending what might be common practice in my area doesn't help a guy who's doing it right for his area.
                              The UK model also runs straight beads in downhill cross country pipelines, can't do that in the U.S. either but advise can really be location specific.

                              And the trick to getting slick in all position welds is of course practice, practice, practice and then practice some more. It comes faster for some people and slower for others. But a determined individual can become slick, it just takes more time and rod. I wasted I don't know how many pounds of rod before I could make a solid, workmanlike weld.
                              In the learning process cranking the machine up and down is counterproductive in my mind assuming you are in the general ballpark. If your welds are looking poor, and your heat is close to good, then just burn that rod, It'll come. A lot of new guys look for the perfect setting on the machine when in reality they just need technique improvement. A slick welder can make a slick weld over a fairly broad range of amperages from way too cold to smoking hot, practice and developing technique trumps the "perfect" machine setting every time. If you can't (yet) really weld, there is no magic setting that will run a pretty cap as that lies in the hands of the welder. Look at the manufacturers recomended parameters for the particular rod, set the machine in the lower half of those parameters and burn rod. That's my best take on it.

                              JTMcC
                              Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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                              • #30
                                I learn something new everey day!!

                                mike sr
                                mike sr

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