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  • Dx...?

    I've been looking for a TIG machine and have been back and forth between buying new and used. My latest prospect is a (used) ~1995 Syncrowave 250 with a Tweeco cooler. My question is: how does this vintage Syncrowave compare with the current model the 250 DX? What does the DX stand for...?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Anybody...? At the very least aren't there any Miller rep's prowling these forums that can tell me the difference between DX and non-DX Syncrowave power sources...?

    Comment


    • #3
      The syncrowave topology has not changed much over the past 20yrs with the exception of adding microprocessor control.
      They are fairly bullet proof and you really can't go wrong with a Syncrowave if the price is right.
      Now if you need portability or your shop has limited power supply, the inverters are the way to go.
      The inverters have more arc control as well that makes them better precision welders.
      I still have lots of customers that demand the Syncrowaves. Don't be afraid of them.

      Andy

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      • #4
        Sync DX

        The DX was attached to the Syncrowave name when the new model came out in 2000. Prior to the DX, the Syncrowave 250 did not have sequence capabilities (the ability to follow pre programed amperages), or pulsing capabilities (the ability to automatically fluctuate from a high to low amperage based off of pre-sets, used to decrease warpage on thin metal). The machine was only capable of pulsing if a PC 300 was added which was an additional machine. With the introduction of the DX, a pulse or sequence module could be purchased and installed in the machine if desired. You should expect a great arc out of either machine, the main questions are do you see value in:
        3 yr warranty
        ability to add additional equipment (pulser/sequencer)
        digital meters
        ability to customize your arc start

        Other things to consider is the price and condition of the used equipment...

        Let me know if you have more questions

        kw
        Kirk W.
        Weld Engineer
        Miller Electric Mfg. Co.

        Comment


        • #5
          hilljackian,

          Sounds like Andy and Kirk have covered the differences pretty well.

          As a guy who had a '96 Syncrowave 250 and replaced it with a late model Sync 250 DX Tigrunner (nothing wrong with the older 250, just wanted a few of the later features), I will say there's considerable differences in the two machines.

          The digital meters are nice, especially when working in the lower amp ranges. I ordered and installed the pulser for my new unit. Well worth the $200 or so I spent. Easy install--15 min.

          Arc starts on the Syncrowave's has always been good (not necessarily a strong point on the Dynasty 200's prior to blue lightning).

          I don't know if it's because of the new pedal with the newer machine, but the Sync 250 DX does, seem to me, to be more "responsive" to the pedal than the older Sync.

          Overall, the older Syncs were workhorses, which, with minimal maintenance, will last nearly forever. If you've got the power to run one, and the deal is right, you can't hardly go wrong with a 13 yr old Sync. They may not look quite as "spiffy" as the newer DX with integrated cooler and running gear, but they will still lay a heck of a bead. Also excellent stick welders.

          Now if Miller would get off the dime and introduce an inverter in the 250-275 A range, I may change my tune. Until that happens, they'll always be a Sync 250 in the shop.
          Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200 DX
          Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
          Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
          Hobart HH187
          Dialarc 250 AC/DC
          Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
          Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
          PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
          Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
          Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
          More grinders than hands

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          • #6
            Thanks guys, that is exactly the information I was looking for.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by hilljackian View Post
              Thanks guys, that is exactly the information I was looking for.
              Except that no one has told you yet what "DX" stands for

              www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
              Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
              MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
              Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

              Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
              Miller 30-A Spoolgun
              Miller WC-115-A
              Miller Spectrum 300
              Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
              Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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              • #8
                I was looking for the explanation of it as well??

                mike sr
                mike sr

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm guessing "deluxe"
                  Miller Syncrowave 180
                  Millermatic 251
                  Thermal Dynamics 51 Plasma
                  Wolfpac 175
                  Etc.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Miller Kirk View Post
                    Sync DX

                    The DX was attached to the Syncrowave name when the new model came out in 2000. Prior to the DX, the Syncrowave 250 did not have sequence capabilities (the ability to follow pre programed amperages), or pulsing capabilities (the ability to automatically fluctuate from a high to low amperage based off of pre-sets, used to decrease warpage on thin metal). The machine was only capable of pulsing if a PC 300 was added which was an additional machine. With the introduction of the DX, a pulse or sequence module could be purchased and installed in the machine if desired. You should expect a great arc out of either machine, the main questions are do you see value in:
                    3 yr warranty
                    ability to add additional equipment (pulser/sequencer)
                    digital meters
                    ability to customize your arc start

                    Other things to consider is the price and condition of the used equipment...

                    Let me know if you have more questions

                    kw
                    Do you have a PC 300 for sale

                    Comment

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