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  • Carbon Arc Torches

    Are carbon arc torches and the appropriate rods still available.

  • #2
    Yep.

    Arcair
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    • #3
      Or were you looking for one of these?
      Attached Files
      Jeff

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      • #4
        J Hall not sure what that is, since Ive never seen one I'm guessing they were not a big hit or for a very specialized operation.

        An Air arc uses compressed air and a carbon rod and if I'm not mistaken a Arc air uses pure oxegen and a lance.

        The arc air is great for piercing through the center of pins while a air arc is great for cutting weld away.

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        • #5
          The carbon arc torch was used with an AC machine for brazing, heating, etc.
          It is old school.

          In my world, Air arc and arc air are interchable for the CAC torch, which is used for gouging.

          The Slice torch, exo torch,and oxygen lance use oxygen.
          Jeff

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
            J Hall not sure what that is, since Ive never seen one I'm guessing they were not a big hit or for a very specialized operation.

            An Air arc uses compressed air and a carbon rod and if I'm not mistaken a Arc air uses pure oxegen and a lance.

            The arc air is great for piercing through the center of pins while a air arc is great for cutting weld away.

            What J hall posted is a Carbon arc torch which is different than a air-carbon setup... I don't know which the OP was actually asking about.


            A carbon arc torch setup is simply a naked arc between two carbon electrodes.... It's a heat source that lets you do most things that an O/A
            welding torch will let you do. It's actually a very old process. no electricity flows through the metal.

            an arc-air is similar yet completely different.... in that process you're creating an arc between a hollow carbon straw and the metal, then forcing compressed air through it to displace the melted metal.
            Bobcat 225NT
            Cutmaster 52
            Lincoln Weld-Pak 100 buzz box
            Caterpillar TH63
            '07 Kawasaki ZZR600

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            • #7
              The Arcair uses a copper coated solid carbon and the air blows behind the arc.

              The slice torch uses Pure oxygen through a hollow rod.
              Jeff

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              • #8
                slicing rods

                [I use a broco underwater cutting system. uses a 12 volt battery and a copper plate. to start it you call to the suface to make it hot. they throw a knife switch which makes the tourch active.then you pull the trigger and pure oxygen flows through the centre of the rod. you touch the plate and it sparks then starts to burn at 10,000 degress. cuts darn near anything. self consuming and you get about a 4 inch cut from one rod. they are expensive about 6-8- dollars apiece plus the cost of oxygen for the underwater ones which are just taped with black tape to keep them from arcing out the side. have made my own when in a pinch.a picture below of me cutting underwater.diverdown
                Attached Files
                sigpic2001 Dodge Ram welding truck. Hobart champion 10.000, miller Diversion 165. miller 180 autoset with spoolgun. SIP plasma cutter. Airless plastic welder.1996 28 foot bayliner for hauling dive and welding equipment

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                • #9
                  I think what RW was asking about, and what J hall offered a picture of, is a twin-carbon arc torch, which has nothing to do with arc-air gouging. The last of these were maybe the ones that were still available as accessory tools for Sears and Forney AC buzz-boxes until the early Eighties or so. I've had one over thirty years and find it to be occasionally very useful. The most frequent use for me is not welding but heating seized nuts/bolts/studs/etc.. You touch the two carbons to either side of the seized fastener, switch on the power, and the fastener is soon glowing hot, and without your having to have exposed anything else on the assembly to the flame envelope of a gas torch. You can also heat things with the carbon arc "flame" (without touching the carbons to the work), as you would use a rosebud tip on your gas outfit, and the electricity used costs a lot less than gasses.

                  I also use the arc torch for brazing from time to time, not that I couldn't do it another way but because it's fun, because everybody thinks it's old and cool and exotic, and again because it saves on weld gasses.

                  The rap on the carbon arc torch was that it might introduce unwanted carbon contamination to the weld. This was much more of a factor with single-carbon welding, a process that really is obsolete, and not much of a factor with twin-carbon welding as long as you weren't welding touchy, high-tech steels.

                  I don't think of twin-carbon arc torch as any more "obsolete" than stick-welding or gas-welding. You can certainly get along without it, but it's another tool in the kit, and occasionally it's the best tool.

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                  • #10
                    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...%3DI%26otn%3D2
                    Jeff

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J hall View Post
                      Or were you looking for one of these?
                      That is what I am looking for, Is there an address or website available relating
                      to the picture.
                      thank You.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by R W View Post
                        That is what I am looking for, Is there an address or website available relating
                        to the picture.
                        thank You.
                        According to the site where I found it, Lincoln has discontinued them. But I did post a link to one on Ebay, if you missed it.
                        Jeff

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                        • #13
                          The carbons used for arc-air gouging are on the small side for the twin-carbon torch. I bought enough carbons to last me indefinitely when I bought the torch years ago, so I haven't kept track of suppliers, but now I'm curious. When I get a chance (or you can do it first), I'll look up suppliers of carbons for old-fashioned movie theater projectors. And maybe the process is still in use overseas, somewhere. The standard welding/brazing electrode was compressed carbon, but the best ones were pure graphite. With the small diameter electrodes, 3/16 or 1/4" diameter, don't use more than 30-40A, probably. If the carbon gets red more than about an inch from the tip, it's getting too hot. Wear at least a #12 lens.

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                          • #14
                            For the few guys who might have some interest in CAW and CAWT:

                            Went into the local Airgas outlet, which still pictures a twin-carbon torch by Lincoln on their website, and had them look for the torch, a non-stocking item. The counterman called Lincoln, where the torch is NLA, and had them see if their computer could find any Lincoln warehouse or outlet where there might be a torch remaining on the shelves. The answer, as far as they could tell, was no.

                            I also stopped by the Sears parts and service store in Seattle, and had a veteran parts-guy search their computer using the part numbers I gave him for the old Sears torch and carbons. He couldn't find anything useful.

                            I've been informed by interested parties that neither the UK nor Australia make or sell this equipment anymore. So unless we locate new equipment in Europe or in remoter locales, if anyone wants to try this process he will have to buy used equipment or make his own.

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