Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Whats the most usual thing that you have fixed?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • acwd1950
    started a topic Whats the most usual thing that you have fixed?

    Whats the most usual thing that you have fixed?

    A keyless drill chuck. The ring that moves the jaws in and out had cracked. So I tigged it up.

    Steve

    I meant unusual cant even work the spell check right
    Last edited by acwd1950; 03-18-2009, 12:31 PM.

  • Bubblemaker
    replied
    Hmmm!

    Hello again!

    The Captain of the boat had a millermatic 135 with I believe...a spoolmate 3035 and was using an SGA 100 control box!

    It actually worked quite well. He uses it to do regular maintenance on the boat...but not ususally under those rough circumstances! It was pretty tight in there under the berth.

    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Bubblemaker View Post
    Hello!

    I'm new to this forum!

    That is a tough question.

    I guess it would have to be a tie between the ss plate of a friend of mine's upper dental partial and a badly leaking crack in 50' aluminum diving boat's hull while it was in the water. The only way to keep the crack dry was to bring the boat up to almost full speed to create a negative pressure outside the hull's crack. There were lots of waves that day!:


    Cheers!

    I like that last one...that is truly thinking out of the box!!
    What did you use to do it??

    Leave a comment:


  • Bubblemaker
    replied
    Hmmm!

    Hello!

    I'm new to this forum!

    That is a tough question.

    I guess it would have to be a tie between the ss plate of a friend of mine's upper dental partial and a badly leaking crack in 50' aluminum diving boat's hull while it was in the water. The only way to keep the crack dry was to bring the boat up to almost full speed to create a negative pressure outside the hull's crack. There were lots of waves that day!:


    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bubblemaker
    replied
    Hmmm!

    Hello!

    I'm new to this forum!

    That is a tough question.

    I guess it would have to be a tie between the ss plate of a friend of mine's upper dental partial and a badly leaking crack in 50' aluminum diving boat's hull while it was in the water. The only way to keep the crack dry was to bring the boat up to almost full speed to create a negative pressure outside the hull's crack. There were lots of waves that day!:


    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • RAD
    replied
    My strangest would have to be a lampshade and an air horn off a Mack truck . It just seems to me it would have been cheaper to replace them.

    Leave a comment:


  • migwelder05
    replied
    Originally posted by JL_Welding View Post
    Did I forget to say it was a retirement nudist colony.I will never be able to look at another leaf blower the same again.
    Originally posted by Vicegrip View Post
    A stainless medical device used by a OBGYN.
    Originally posted by Paul Seaman View Post
    I fixed a tool that a rancher friend of mine uses. It is made to put rubber bands on Bulls for castration. Yes, I did wash it before, I touched it.

    Wierd enough?

    Peace,
    Paul


    Thats all i have to say!!

    Leave a comment:


  • JL_Welding
    replied
    Did I forget to say it was a retirement nudist colony.I will never be able to look at another leaf blower the same again.

    Leave a comment:


  • vin-man welding
    replied
    Originally posted by JL_Welding View Post
    Golf cart battery box, at a nudist colony.
    they looking for any more help?

    Leave a comment:


  • JL_Welding
    replied
    Golf cart battery box, at a nudist colony.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bodybagger
    replied
    Of course I took pics! I'll eventually post them.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Bodybagger View Post
    I just had one that was worth digging up this thread.

    Today, I welded the bronze statue of an early Supreme Court Justice. I was told that an authentic replica would cost $250,000 but the original was irreplaceable.

    The damage to the monument was likely done by would-be metal thieves trying to scrap it.

    I'll tell you this - I had to work my butt off to fight cracking. And man did I do a lot of peening. But it's done and looks good.

    One of the more "unusual" things I've gotten the call for.

    Did you happen to snap a pic or two when you wuz fixin' it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bodybagger
    replied
    I just had one that was worth digging up this thread.

    Today, I welded the bronze statue of an early Supreme Court Justice. I was told that an authentic replica would cost $250,000 but the original was irreplaceable.

    The damage to the monument was likely done by would-be metal thieves trying to scrap it.

    I'll tell you this - I had to work my butt off to fight cracking. And man did I do a lot of peening. But it's done and looks good.

    One of the more "unusual" things I've gotten the call for.

    Leave a comment:


  • engnerdan
    replied
    I welded a bra underwire, it is a curved piece of stainless about 1/8" wide and about .030 thick. It was not pretty but it worked.

    I also welded my cell phone belt clip, it was riveted together but they gave out so I welded the stainless and the spring steel together and it is still working.

    -Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • Burnt hands
    replied
    An art teacher at the gallery where I show my titanium sculptures called me and asked if I could possibly fix her camera tripod which had a broken leg.

    I said of course figuring it would be a simple fix and would be good PR for me.

    Well to my surprise, it was a professional model with a fluid head and very well built (and very expensive). She is a sculpture instructor and professional photographer and her photos are worthy of National Geographic.

    So I looked at the broken part and did a few quick tests with a magnet to see if it was aluminum or possibly magnesium.

    Carved off a few shavings to see if it would burn like magnesium

    Didn't burn like magnesium so I figured it was aluminum - (mistake 1)

    So with this in mind, I set up to tig the crack. ( mistake 2)

    The top of the leg melted and I was stuck with a pile of bird droppings on the top of the leg. It wasn't aluminum!.

    Possibly a zinc alloy but after this I was not going to experiment to see.

    So after I finished cussing my stupidity, I went online to see what a replacement leg would cost for this tripod.

    Cost was $140 as it is made in Germany.

    The tripod itself was over $850 - ouch.

    Decided to take a break before I messed things up even more.

    Options:

    1 - Tell the teacher I messed up and give her back the pieces - bad for the ego and truly not a solution

    2 - Buy a new leg and install it. Worse for the ego (coward's way out I thought)

    Luckily she told me that there was no hurry to fix it.

    So I stewed, simmered and kicked myself over the weekend wondering what I could do. Had some friends over for dinner and told them about my dilemma.

    They looked at my mess and one said it looked like the 6 million dollar man tv show in the 70's.

    WOW - thanks guys - I can rebuild it better!.

    Silly me, I didn't even think of using a different metal to fix the part.

    So I rebuilt the leg top and pivot using stainless steel pieces I had around.
    No problem tigging this time and no surprises.

    While the original leg was threaded to connect to the top plate, I made a stainless cap and pinned it to the leg.

    Took off the "kick me" sign I had put on my back.

    The rebuilt leg works well and both the teacher and I were very happy.

    She wanted to pay me but I said it was a simple fix so no charge.

    What I learned by thinking outside the box was well worth it.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X