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12" mitersaw used for cut off grinder?

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
    FK,

    All those things are great and that's how I use the saw (like the one in the picture) for WOOD and plastic (starboard).

    Don't know what your experience has been cutting critical angles with an abrasive blade, but mine have been less than rewarding. Before I got the cold cut saw and the bandsaw, I used to try to cut "exact" angles with an abrasive blade without much success. Too much flex in the abrasive blade. Would end up cutting my work slightly oversize (1/16" or so) and do the final finish on the vertical belt sander with a miter gauge attached.

    I do have an old Craftsman Professional 10" compound miter saw (metal blade guard) that I do use to cut aluminum with a carbide blade. Does a better job than the cold saw.

    A steady diet of steel will quickly destroy that Makita. It's a great, well built saw, but that's not what it was designed to do.

    I've said enough. You pay for the dance, you call the tune.
    Oh I am totally with you...I hate abrasive blade and almost never use them. I just cannot stand the noise, mess, and wasted money. Not to mention the FLEX.
    I watched one of those big Brilliant versions blow up into a friends arm one day. He deserved it tho as he was seeing just how hard he could mash it when it blew. In fact he did many other entertaining things before they let him go
    But I would love to watch how this set-up works.

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    FK,

    All those things are great and that's how I use the saw (like the one in the picture) for WOOD and plastic (starboard).

    Don't know what your experience has been cutting critical angles with an abrasive blade, but mine have been less than rewarding. Before I got the cold cut saw and the bandsaw, I used to try to cut "exact" angles with an abrasive blade without much success. Too much flex in the abrasive blade. Would end up cutting my work slightly oversize (1/16" or so) and do the final finish on the vertical belt sander with a miter gauge attached.

    I do have an old Craftsman Professional 10" compound miter saw (metal blade guard) that I do use to cut aluminum with a carbide blade. Does a better job than the cold saw.

    A steady diet of steel will quickly destroy that Makita. It's a great, well built saw, but that's not what it was designed to do.

    I've said enough. You pay for the dance, you call the tune.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post

    Just not understanding the logic.

    The compound angles And the ability to change them quickly while reading directly off of the saw instead of fumbling around with whatever.
    Repeatability etc...

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    allessence,

    I'll make you a deal.

    You send me that 12" Makita Sliding Mitre Saw and I'll send you any top quality metal chop saw (your choice). Ask nicely, and I may even send a Milwaukee Metal Cold Saw.

    That Makita is about a $600+ saw which was designed for cutting wood. A good Milwaukee chop saw with mitre vice, designed for cutting metal, is just a few bucks over $200. Heck, a Milwaukee cold cut saw can be had for less than $500.

    Just not understanding the logic.

    Besides, I don't want to be in your shoes when one of those abrasive blades explodes and takes out the plastic blade shield on the Makita. At least on the metal chop saws the guard is metal.

    Leave a comment:


  • dseman
    replied
    Originally posted by allessence View Post
    Never talked about using a metal cutting blade like in the Cold saw or such these types of things need incredible holding power. When using the table saw with an abrasive cutoff wheel It barely needs to be held at all if fed straight.

    So, I as talking a 12" abrasive cutoff blade: These are good to 5100RPM's. The saw turns at 4100rpms. I've used abrasive wheels on cicular saws with good reasult thought usually chew thru them pretty quick. I figure I'm going to suit up with safety gear and give it a go. The saw was cheap money and the blade is like 7.00 if nothing else the blade will simply end up on the table saw and I'll use that instead.




    By the way. The band saw is a nice thing to have. My problem is I'm room limited until I build my new shop and that won't be for a couple more years.

    (stored outside) Besides having a complete Blacksmithing shop, including all the shrinker and benders and shears and 3 anvils and large forge and all the hand tools, roughly 6 tons of equipment.

    In the shop (15X18') now I have a 50 ton press, 50 gallon parts washer, Miller Dynasty 350, 2 ton engine hoist, welding table, 20" drill press, tool cabinet, Transmission rebuild stand, Welding table and the list goes on.

    Everything I make has to be able to fold and move with ease. I'm getting ready to make my new welding table which will fold and be on casters. I'll post pictures when I get it started.
    No problem with using an abrasive disc, other than the abrasive dust and likelihood of melted plastic parts from the shower of sparks.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Cool...looking forward to that.
    Sorry 'bout the hijack but you got a pretty good thread going here.

    Leave a comment:


  • allessence
    replied
    Never talked about using a metal cutting blade like in the Cold saw or such these types of things need incredible holding power. When using the table saw with an abrasive cutoff wheel It barely needs to be held at all if fed straight.

    So, I as talking a 12" abrasive cutoff blade: These are good to 5100RPM's. The saw turns at 4100rpms. I've used abrasive wheels on cicular saws with good reasult thought usually chew thru them pretty quick. I figure I'm going to suit up with safety gear and give it a go. The saw was cheap money and the blade is like 7.00 if nothing else the blade will simply end up on the table saw and I'll use that instead.




    By the way. The band saw is a nice thing to have. My problem is I'm room limited until I build my new shop and that won't be for a couple more years.

    (stored outside) Besides having a complete Blacksmithing shop, including all the shrinker and benders and shears and 3 anvils and large forge and all the hand tools, roughly 6 tons of equipment.

    In the shop (15X18') now I have a 50 ton press, 50 gallon parts washer, Miller Dynasty 350, 2 ton engine hoist, welding table, 20" drill press, tool cabinet, Transmission rebuild stand, Welding table and the list goes on.

    Everything I make has to be able to fold and move with ease. I'm getting ready to make my new welding table which will fold and be on casters. I'll post pictures when I get it started.

    Leave a comment:


  • dseman
    replied
    The main reason not to use a woodworking miter saw for metalworking IS the blade speed. Note the difference in max. rpm stamped by the blade manufacturer and you'll begin to understand why.

    Leave a comment:


  • MTBob
    replied
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
    DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT.

    Woodworking sliding mitre saws (and I have a Makita just like that one) do not have the clamping vice needed for cutting steel. I have used a cheap woodworking mitre saw for cutting aluminum but wouldn't consider it for steel.

    For cutting steel, particularly at any angle other than 90 deg, tremendous pressure us put on the material being cut, trying to draw it into the blade. (Maybe best to be thought of as pulling the material through the vice). A woodworking mitre saw lacks sufficient holding capacity..
    SundownIII is right, wood saws are not built for cutting steel. You need to have a much more rigid clamping vice. On 90 degree cuts it's not so critical, but as mentioned before, on angle cuts, the blade will want to grab and pull the work. Having a second clamp on the vice jaws is a good practice.

    One thing that wasn't mentioned in this threat is RPM. I think wood saws run at a higher speed than cold cutoff saws. My Evolution saw runs at 1450 RPM, I think many wood saws run around 4000 RPM. If that's the case, then the cold cutoff blade teeth may not handle the higher RPM. I've been using an Evolution saw for several years. The frame and vice are built much heavier than a wood saw - just what's needed for cutting steel. I would NEVER try cutting steel on a wood saw - a really bad idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by wrenchnride247 View Post
    Man...gotta quit "thread jacking"
    We are still discussing saws

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  • wrenchnride247
    replied
    Man...gotta quit "thread jacking"

    Leave a comment:


  • wrenchnride247
    replied
    That's great deal. (you get all the breaks) Blades make a big difference in cutting square. I don't use the coolant on mine anymore. I use lenox diemaster 2's, and change tooth count depending on what i'm cutting.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    I found this at a shop 1/4 of a mile away from mine. Said it wouldn't cut straight. Had a new Lennox blade on it. I offered to fix it for free for him. He said he was done with it and wanted $200....so I did that
    He even delivered it to where it's setting in the pic along with giving me that motor as well





    http://i378.photobucket.com/albums/o...g/100_0132.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by wrenchnride247 View Post
    I would be crying too... that's why I don't have one either. Just throwing options out there. I'm happy with my 7x12 horizontal band saw for most stuff.
    Hey I got one of those myself

    Leave a comment:


  • wrenchnride247
    replied
    I would be crying too... that's why I don't have one either. Just throwing options out there. I'm happy with my 7x12 horizontal band saw for most stuff.

    Leave a comment:

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