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  • Miller Dynasty 200dx. 110 home outlet?

    Hello yall

    I own miller Dynasty 200dx. I currently using it with 220 3 prong dryer style plug I have the white and black wire on the left and right side of the 3 prong 220 plug. And the green wire which i assume is the ground on the top single prong. and the other phase red wire tapped off to the side. I was told to wire it this way from the man at the welding store. It works but i just want to clarify it with the gurus out here, on the safe side.

    I am curious to know if i can use this welder powering it off a 110volt home plug. Has anybody done this? I remeber the salesman who sold me the welder telling me this but i never really bothered to try because i always was planning on running it off a 220, but the idea of 110volt sounds good. I wonder if there is any downfall with amperage usage while using a 110 home outlet, our if this can even be done.

    Also how would i go by wire this?

    Any info on this would be appreciated.


    Thanks allot

  • #2
    Wire it the same: black and white to hot and neutral and green to ground. Black and white CAN be reversed with this particular machine, just as it didn't matter which hot was black or white with the 240V input. On this machine, the red will only be used for a three-phase input. Other than that, the machine will automatically adjust to use the power you give it.

    At any same output, the amperage will be double on 120V, so if you are trying to do too much, you will trip the breaker much more easily.

    Comment


    • #3
      Rather than rewire the machine, you might want to just build an adapter to use it on 110v. Basically just make a short "cord" out of a 220v dryer recptical and a 110v cord with plug. Be sure and use a heavy cord like 12G.

      If you do this you can quickly use the dynasty in the shop on 220v as you curently have it wired and then switch to 110 if you want to use it else where. Its alot beter to do it this way, than wire a 110v outlet to a 220v plug.

      I'll Pm you some stuff also.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DSW View Post
        Rather than rewire the machine, you might want to just build an adapter to use it on 110v. Basically just make a short "cord" out of a 220v dryer recptical and a 110v cord with plug. Be sure and use a heavy cord like 12G.

        If you do this you can quickly use the dynasty in the shop on 220v as you curently have it wired and then switch to 110 if you want to use it else where. Its alot beter to do it this way, than wire a 110v outlet to a 220v plug.

        I'll Pm you some stuff also.
        First off thanks for a quick helpful reply.

        Sounds like a perfect ideal there, be looking forward to your PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
          Wire it the same: black and white to hot and neutral and green to ground. Black and white CAN be reversed with this particular machine, just as it didn't matter which hot was black or white with the 240V input. On this machine, the red will only be used for a three-phase input. Other than that, the machine will automatically adjust to use the power you give it.

          At any same output, the amperage will be double on 120V, so if you are trying to do too much, you will trip the breaker much more easily.

          Thanks for the info and quick response. Good info of the black and white wires being able to reverse.

          Also can you clarify the issues of using a 110 standard home plug with the miller dynasty 200dx? Does the breaker trip there for needing to reset the main breaker if the machine is set at too high of a amperage? Does it vary from the type of current our frequency/process? How high of a amperage can the machine be set on before tripping out the breaker using a 110 home outlet.? Any lost of welding consistency our the outcome/ quality using 110?

          Comment


          • #6
            There will be no difference in weld quality on the lower input voltage.

            The circuit breaker for the household receptacle will be the limiting factor. When it trips, you'll have to reset it and then weld at lower currents, or at a lower duty cycle.

            Whereas the machine can go as high as 200A on a 240 input, you are already going to be limited to 150A on a 120V circuit, however.

            TIG welding at 100A output will draw 20.7A on your 120V circuit. Stick welding at only 90A is going to draw 27.6A, so that tells you that you will be limited to a low duty cycle to keep your circuit breaker cool, assuming even a 20A circuit. Some are only 15A. But these numbers should give you something to work with.

            I got them here: http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/spec_sheets/AD4-8.pdf

            Comment


            • #7
              I have used the Dyn on 120V a couple times at work. 20A circuit, it would run 3/32" 7018 ok, 6011 fin, and 6010 not much. Breaker would trip frequently if not watching the arc time (wait between sticks)

              Tig was ok up to about 100A.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by enlpck View Post
                I have used the Dyn on 120V a couple times at work. 20A circuit, it would run 3/32" 7018 ok, 6011 fin, and 6010 not much. Breaker would trip frequently if not watching the arc time (wait between sticks)

                Tig was ok up to about 100A.
                How much amps did you run when u were using stick? 80-100? with the 110
                Last edited by AWSGTAW; 02-28-2009, 05:08 AM. Reason: s

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by AWSGTAW View Post
                  How much amps did you run when u were using stick? 80-100? with the 110
                  Don't recall for sure. '18 was run a little cold to avoid popping the breaker. '11 was not a problem. For whatever reason, 6010 wasn't really runnable, even 3/32. Wouldn't hold the arc. Then again, I couldn't tell you how '10 runs on a Dynasty powered by 240V, so I don't know if it was the supply or the machine itself.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here ya go

                    http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o2240x_mil.pdf



                    and the wiring for the Pigtail
                    Attached Files
                    Ed Conley
                    http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                    MM252
                    MM211
                    Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
                    TA185
                    Miller 125c Plasma 120v
                    O/A set
                    SO 2020 Bender
                    You can call me Bacchus

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i have a real nice setup i use for going from 110 to 220 or three phase i'll post some pic's later today.
                      TB 325
                      TB 302
                      dynasty 200sd
                      spoolmatic 30a/wc24
                      suitcase x-treme 12vs
                      miller 211
                      evolution rage 2

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I pretty much use my maxstar 200dx exclusively off 110. My entire garage and another out-building are wired into a single 20A breaker. I am limited to 130A for Tig, and have to been mindful of my duty-cycle or a pop the breaker, but I managed to do $10k in work last year on this setup so go figure.

                        Oh, and I am welding mostly 1/8" wall tubing and up to 3/16 flat.
                        Miller Maxstar 200 DX
                        RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
                        Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
                        Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
                        Hitachi 4.5" grinder
                        http://mhayesdesign.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How about slow-blow fuses or breakers? Maybe after the initial arc-strike, the current demands are less.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think it depends on your power source. I have been nothing but impressed with the ability of both of my Dynasties on 115v.
                            I had been welder shopping for quite some time and when I read many posts on this forum about how HIGH of amps people were getting on this lower voltage I knew I needed one. I have not been disappointed.
                            I have found that about 200 ft of 10 ga. cord will get you around 115 amps on a 15 amp breaker if you don't stay there too long.
                            I have run 1/8th inch 7018 uphill on a 20 amp breaker and 75 ft of 10 ga. cord rod after rod without ever popping the breaker. I was very impressed with the arc quality as well.
                            At another vendor I weld regularly at a location that has me wired on one leg of a three phase box and it has an old screw in buss fuse (30 amp). I slam that set-up all day as hard as it will go on tig aluminum. When the amps get too high it sorta cuts in and out in a way very hard to describe other than WA-WA-WA and then you just back off a tad and keep right on feeding rod
                            If my Dynasty would not run about any 1/8th on 115v I would probably be looking for something I had done wrong hooking it up. The first night I had my first dynasty it made over 170 amps AC tig on 115v.
                            Most of the electric service in my area has 125 and 250 volts so that may be one reason I get such fabulous results with my machines.YMMV

                            www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                            Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                            MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                            Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                            Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                            Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                            Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                            Miller WC-115-A
                            Miller Spectrum 300
                            Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                            Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                            • #15
                              I'm pretty sure that I wired a 4 prong cord incorrectly to the 3 prong cord so I could use a Miller dynasty 200 at home the machine worked for a while then we heard a pop sound and now it won't even turn on. Can anyone recommend where to start the troubleshooting process?

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