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7010 for galvanized structural ?

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  • 7010 for galvanized structural ?

    I was wondering wether or not 7010 might be good substitute for 6011/7018
    on 1/4 to 1/2" galvanized almost all fillets.
    This is my first post I tried to post this twice without luck and it has shrunk by about 100 words each time.
    I always enjoy reading this forum and picking up tips fromall you vets out there. thank you.

  • #2
    umm.... 6011 is not a substitute for 7018 and neither is 6010 or 7010.

    If you're welding structural and it's not some crazy design, grind off the zinc and use 7018, then use cold galv compound on the welds.
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    • #3
      7010?

      I'll give you alittle back round on what I'm doing. Bare with me please ,I've
      Been a comercial carpenter for 22years, but a certified welder for only three.
      We do alot of lightweight pre-cast (GFRC) panel jobs, which are basically a fiberglass reinforced concrete face attached at the plant to a structural galvanized frame. We set The panels at the job sight. On all the bearing and heavier connections and pre-welds , we use a 6011 to burn off the galvanized and dig into the base good then, cap with a 7018.
      most of the tie back connections are say 1/4" angle into light gage (16ga.)
      My boss is really hung up on the 6011. We run the 6011 on DCEP and try to find a heat range that will work for 1/8" 6011, 1/8" 7018 in all aplications -all positions, heavy to heavy and heavy to light gage.
      I understand that 6011 is a ac rod but it does work well on the galvanized and penetrates better than 7018. I may be off base but it is my understanding that 6011 is the AC version of 6010, and 7010 is a 70,000 psi
      version of 6010. I was wondering if 7010 might work for all welds. Some jobs call for a E70XX Electrode but they never spell out that it needs to be low hydrgen.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by latebreaker View Post
        I'll give you alittle back round on what I'm doing. Bare with me please ,I've
        Been a comercial carpenter for 22years, but a certified welder for only three.
        We do alot of lightweight pre-cast (GFRC) panel jobs, which are basically a fiberglass reinforced concrete face attached at the plant to a structural galvanized frame. We set The panels at the job sight. On all the bearing and heavier connections and pre-welds , we use a 6011 to burn off the galvanized and dig into the base good then, cap with a 7018.
        most of the tie back connections are say 1/4" angle into light gage (16ga.)
        My boss is really hung up on the 6011. We run the 6011 on DCEP and try to find a heat range that will work for 1/8" 6011, 1/8" 7018 in all aplications -all positions, heavy to heavy and heavy to light gage.
        I understand that 6011 is a ac rod but it does work well on the galvanized and penetrates better than 7018. I may be off base but it is my understanding that 6011 is the AC version of 6010, and 7010 is a 70,000 psi
        version of 6010. I was wondering if 7010 might work for all welds. Some jobs call for a E70XX Electrode but they never spell out that it needs to be low hydrgen.
        honestly, I would have your boss fire off an RFI to the Engineer of Record for the project. It's their PE stamp on the drawings...
        The engineers we use would have a stroke if I told them I was using ANY 60XX rods. On our plans 7018 is specified for most things and 8018 for welding 60ksi rebar.

        If it was me, I'd prepare the joints and weld them to the weld procedure for the job.
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        • #5
          That sounds like the smart thing to do.
          Most of the structural drawings do call for a E70XX , Which is why I wonder if 7010 might fit the bill. The shop drawings we get from the plant never include
          a procedure, only symbols on the drawings. thanks

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          • #6
            Originally posted by latebreaker View Post
            That sounds like the smart thing to do.
            Most of the structural drawings do call for a E70XX , Which is why I wonder if 7010 might fit the bill. The shop drawings we get from the plant never include
            a procedure, only symbols on the drawings. thanks
            We had to request the weld procedure from our metal building manufacturer to satisfy the more **** structural engineers we work with & keep them on file in the office.
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            • #7
              I'll get the boss on it!
              Thank you much.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by latebreaker View Post
                Some jobs call for a E70XX Electrode but they never spell out that it needs to be low hydrgen.

                You would need to make sure there was no restriction in any of the contract documents.
                It will (sort of) depend on the grade of your material, assuming your documents refer to D1.1. Any 60XX or 70XX rod is a prequalified consumable in the lower grades of structural material. In the higher grades you can still use those types of rod but you'd have to qualify your procedure.
                But, from your description you are working in the area between D1.1 and
                D1.3. There has been a ton of light guage structural welding done over the last few years in the southern California area on hospital seismic retrofits, those guys use 6010, 6011, 6013, all flavors of small rods on the various joints they weld.
                I've seen quite a bit of the cellulose consumables (6010, 7010, 8010) used in specialized structural applications.
                It can be as simple as getting an OK from engineering, or as difficult as qualifying a procedure.
                You should do some tests beforehand to see if it's even an improvement using the manpower and equipment you have available.

                JTMcC.
                Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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                • #9
                  after 15 years of welding galv. brick shelfs on structual buildings. welding galv. su*ks. but for your application i'd use 7018 3/32 rod
                  and try going a little bit past your puddle to burn off the galv. then push deep in to the puddle for the weld. do you get what i mean?
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                  • #10
                    I think I get what you mean. I'm fairly new to this and have not run a lot of 7018 for a single or first pass on thickly coated galvanized. The little that I have done usually has not looked good to say the least. I guess I'm just scared to get out of the puddle with 7018. I know that most of the Iron workers on the jobs use 7018 exclusivley, galvanized or not and I never see these guys grind before welding. I guess I need to do some practicing.
                    Thats what I like about welding its always something different and I am always challenged. 22 years as comercial carpenter . Doors/Hardware,roof blocking, wall blocking, blocking, blocking, blocking. You'll only ever get so good at blocking. Welding will always give me something to aspire to.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks JTMcC

                      Thank you the information, I'ts good to know I'm not totally off base with the
                      7010 idea. I'll run the info past the boss and see what he thinks. He"ll probably be afraid of opening up awhole can of worms, when buisiness as usual is working OK, just not as efficiently as it otherwise might.

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                      • #12
                        It is recommended to use a filler that has less than .85% Si due to Zinc Embrittlement

                        I have tried 7010 and had problems cracking and went back to 7018 when it was required to use a 70xx rod. Some flux cores work well also if you have alot to do.

                        Do a google search (galvanize weld cracking) and you will find documentation from AWS and other reputable sources ( Hobart and Lincoln) on excessively high Si content causing zinc embrittlement and cracking on galvanize. Good Luck

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