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  • In need of some welding advice.

    I'm getting ready to weld some subframe connectors on my car. How do i keep from having globby/ runny looking welds when i'm migging a vertical bead? I'll be laying on my back on the garage floor when i do this. Thanks.
    Proud owner of a MM180!

  • #2
    Are You SERIOUS???

    I do not know how to respond to this other than being Truthful and Direct. I will apologize for how this comes out, but it is what it is...

    You need to Learn How To Weld. Plain and Simple. No other way to put it.

    Motorsports of any description where machines and operators are pushed to the limits of performance is NO PLACE FOR BEGINNERS.

    People's lives are at stake - Your's, Your Co-competitor's, Track Official's, Spectator's.

    You have NO RIGHT to endanger the general public.

    If you truly have no idea what you are doing, then Hire a Professional before you kill yourself, or someone else.

    I regularly weld on circle track cars. I know the Drivers, their families, their parents, their children, their friends. Each and every one of them count on me to keep their loved ones safe as they compete.

    It is not a responsibility that I take lightly....Neither should you.

    Do the right thing and hire someone to do it, or have a professional teach you.
    Later,
    Jason

    Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

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    • #3
      Basically, as Jason said so eloquently , if you have to come on the internet and ask how to weld something like this (in the vertical postion no less) then IMHO you have no business even attempting it. Sorry for the harshness of our posts (not really) but if you don't have one already, you may want to invest in a tinfoil hat.
      Dynasty 350DX
      Dynasty 200DX TigRunner
      MM 350P
      MM Passport Plus
      Spectrum 375 Extreme
      08' Trailblazer 302

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      • #4
        Very deceiving!

        MIG is the easiest welding process to learn wrong! It is IMO the hardest welding process to learn correctly with great skill. It looks so easy, but it's very deceiving. PLEASE SPEND TIME LEARNING WHAT YOU ARE DOING BEFORE YOU KILL YOURSELF OR SOMEONE ELSE!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by HAWK View Post
          MIG is the easiest welding process to learn wrong! It is IMO the hardest welding process to learn correctly with great skill. It looks so easy, but it's very deceiving. PLEASE SPEND TIME LEARNING WHAT YOU ARE DOING BEFORE YOU KILL YOURSELF OR SOMEONE ELSE!
          Amen to that.
          Dynasty 200DX, first generation
          Makita 5" grinder
          Makita 14" abrasive saw
          IR SS5L compressor
          Whole bunch of hand/air tools.
          and a wish list a mile long

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mitchell beri View Post
            I'm getting ready to weld some subframe connectors on my car. How do i keep from having globby/ runny looking welds when i'm migging a vertical bead? I'll be laying on my back on the garage floor when i do this. Thanks.
            Hey mitch...just looked at your profile and your posts...looks like you have a good handle on life...2 kids and are a pro firefighter
            We now know you have a handle on safety...cool!!!
            Please don't take some of the posts as insults..I read it yesterday and decided to pass because I sorta feel like lately I've been posting too much of those sorta comments.
            I am a welding racer myself forever. If I was you I would get one of my buddies that you KNEW was a decent welder and work together on getting your machine up to speed. I doubt breaking a subframe connector is gonna kill anyone but it does need to be welded correctly to hold up.
            I would suggest getting some old scrap sheetmetal and some thicker stuff and practice welding it together. Try uphill and downhill both and get good at overhead as well. You gotta learn it all you know...just don't start out doing the critical stuff when you are just getting started.
            And keep reading and posting questions...guys like you are what we need more of!!

            www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
            Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
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            • #7
              Just a thought

              This may be of some help.

              I use to weld with my buzz box on simple stuff and go to folks that I thought could weld to have some things done. Then I decided to go to tech school with a good reputation. What a surprise!!!!! I found as I progressed that the guys I thought could weld were just getting by. I completed all the hands on stuff (vertical, overhead, bevel plate, butt welds, fillets etc.,) and it was time well spent, 5 semesters. Most processes used were MIG (flux and hardwire), TIG and stick...ferrous and non-ferrous alike. I do not regret one minute. That was several years ago. Difference now is I can do most things myself, but still run to the years of experience on this site and local shops in a pinch. Vertical now is not tough, once properly explained and practiced. 10 years ago I would have had trouble.

              Best of luck thanks for your service to the public. Your to be commended
              Geezer
              Miller 175
              Power MIG 255c
              Ranger 8
              1974 Wisconsin 5K AC Only (Cherry)
              Spool Gun
              185 TIG
              Victor/Harris O/A

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              • #8
                First off, you guys gotta do alot better than that if you wanna hurt my feelings. While i'm not a pro like some of you, i don't feel that this is outta my reach. I'm not gonna just dive in and start building a 7 second race car just because i bought a welder and now i think i'm some hot shot fabricator. I DO plan on practicing ALOT before i do this. I work in a steel mill and have the scraps i need at my disposal. I'm just looking for some tips to get me in the ballpark. I think in time with some practice that this is doable for me. Subframe connectors aren't that difficult to install, they just need to be done correctly i agree. Thanks for the input, i'm not insulted in the least. I don't think anyone is at risk or gonna die if i take this project on.
                Proud owner of a MM180!

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                • #9
                  What type of connectors? Are they tubular or square with pads that get welded to the suspension pickup points or are they more like the moroso here's a piece of box section now cut out your floorboards? I have Spohn tubulars in my camaro, they weren't very hard to weld in even though i was very rusty at the time. I had to weld the pads to the rear control arm mounts and then the tubes to the sheet metal (harder to do well). My car is not a race car, i wanted to tighten up the chassis. If i were running fast on the strip i would have spent more time practicing and "improving" the mounting.

                  I agree with all of the above, for the record. If your car is fast enough, this is a safety issue. I would practice by mocking up similar joints in the appropriate positions, noting the settings used and then destrucively test them, after sawing out coupons to check for penetration.

                  Post your results/tests here. If the guys above are comfortable that you want to do it right, I'm sure they will help out.
                  Dynasty 200 DX
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                  • #10
                    You misunderstood my post Mitchell... I was not trying to hurt your feelings, or insult you... I was trying to keep you SAFE.

                    You have no idea how many wanna-be's come on here thinking they know how to weld by watching TV. It is very disturbing. Now that you have responded back, and we have a better understanding of where you are coming from, I may be of assistance to you.

                    Please take the time to read the following thread "Vertical Welds with Mig":

                    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ad.php?t=14203

                    It may help to answer some of your questions.
                    Later,
                    Jason

                    Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Laiky View Post
                      What type of connectors? Are they tubular or square with pads that get welded to the suspension pickup points or are they more like the moroso here's a piece of box section now cut out your floorboards? I have Spohn tubulars in my camaro, they weren't very hard to weld in even though i was very rusty at the time. I had to weld the pads to the rear control arm mounts and then the tubes to the sheet metal (harder to do well). My car is not a race car, i wanted to tighten up the chassis. If i were running fast on the strip i would have spent more time practicing and "improving" the mounting.

                      I agree with all of the above, for the record. If your car is fast enough, this is a safety issue. I would practice by mocking up similar joints in the appropriate positions, noting the settings used and then destrucively test them, after sawing out coupons to check for penetration.

                      Post your results/tests here. If the guys above are comfortable that you want to do it right, I'm sure they will help out.
                      These are the sq. tube type that you put up against the bottom of your frame rail and weld them on. They follow the shape of the floor and the quality/ fit are excellent. They are pretty simple overall. Yours sound pretty similar to mine overall. I'm trying to duplicate on the bench what i'll be doing underneath the car when the time comes. I'm able to get scraps that are the same dimensions as what i'll be welding so that helps tremendously with my machine settings as well as being able to see the backside of my work. So far i've been basically bench welding on a flat surface. I know it's a totally different game lying on my back under my car. I don't mind some crticism, it comes with the territory. I'm just looking for some solid advice. None of us were born with a welding lead in our hands. I will definitely post some pic's and would welcome some constructive criticism. Thanks alot guys.
                      Last edited by mitchell beri; 11-24-2008, 06:30 PM. Reason: typo
                      Proud owner of a MM180!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Black Wolf View Post
                        You misunderstood my post Mitchell... I was not trying to hurt your feelings, or insult you... I was trying to keep you SAFE.

                        You have no idea how many wanna-be's come on here thinking they know how to weld by watching TV. It is very disturbing. Now that you have responded back, and we have a better understanding of where you are coming from, I may be of assistance to you.

                        Please take the time to read the following thread "Vertical Welds with Mig":

                        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ad.php?t=14203

                        It may help to answer some of your questions.

                        Hey, i appreciated it believe me. I think the same way you do. I'm not afraid to step aside and let a pro take the lead (pun intended). I didn't find yours or anyone elses remarks offensive. Maybe a tad strong in some respects. BUT, truthful none-the-less.
                        Proud owner of a MM180!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Best of luck thanks for your service to the public. Your to be commended[/QUOTE]

                          Hey Geezer, thanks for the kind words. I'm actually an industrial firefighter by profession. It's a little different than a city job, but at the end of the day it all works out the same. I have plenty of friends on city departments and they always call me the "wanna- be firefighter". I just grin, tell them it's OK and remind them that i make about twice what they do and don't get shot at when i respond to fires either! That usually shuts them up. LOL!!!
                          Proud owner of a MM180!

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                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=mitchell beri;166466]Hey, i appreciated it believe me. I think the same way you do. I'm not afraid to step aside and let a pro take the lead (pun intended). I didn't find yours or anyone elses remarks offensive. Maybe a tad strong in some respects. BUT, truthful none-the-less.[/QUOTE)

                            Forgot to say thanks for the link. Mitch
                            Proud owner of a MM180!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I can only say Mitchell that to practice in the position you intend to weld till it no longer looks gooby. Travel speed, wire speed, heat settings and technique all interact. If its gooby and drippy, you might be going to slow. Other than that practice. Thats it. Enjoy the project.

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