Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New stomping grounds!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New stomping grounds!

    Well I landed a nice job welding at a local shipyard here in Jax, with very good pay. One thing they asked me that I have'nt done is "Can you tig weld Copper Nickel?". I told them, that I have never welded that alloy, and they said dont worry, because if you can weld mild steel well, you can weld copper nickel no problem. Anyways, with the way the local job market here is, Im am very happy for my family to land such a well paying job. It will be easier for me to get christmas gifts for my two little girls, and a new crib for our 3rd unborn girl due in January. They made me take a weld test, and I passed with flying colors. I passed so well, that they started me off a couple dollars above everyone else that got new hired. I guess now I will be able to afford a new pack of underwear, and a new toothbrush after all.

    Question to all of you veteran welders, yes even the veteran welders that dont like me here on this forum, "What is copper nickel used for?". "Is it used for pipe welding, or intercooler type work ?". I cant see copper nickel being as strong as steel. Last question, "What metals can you weld with copper nickel, and for you veterans of shipyards, what was this filler metal used for?".

    Thank you for the answers to my questions in advance. I will surely get pictures of the new job shop when I start working this friday.
    If you want peace, be prepared for war!

  • #2
    I don't have any experience in the area, but I'm guessing the copper nickle is piping for salt water.

    Dynasty200DX w/coolmate1
    MM210
    MM Vintage
    Lincoln AC225
    Victor O/A, Smith AW1A
    Cutmaster 81
    IR 2475N7.5FP
    Evolution Rage3
    Jancy USA101
    9" South Bend
    AEAD-200LE

    Comment


    • #3
      Cruz, Cupronickel is used where corrosion is a problem, there have been sailboat hulls made of it that after 20 years had no marine growth due to the copper part. An Expensive alloy, but quite useful in the marine environment. As to welding, I have no experience, congrats on the new job, Best Regards ,Paul
      More Spark Today Pleasesigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Andy is correct. It is used for saltwater piping, heat exchangers, refrigeration condensers, etc., due to it's superior corrosion/electrolysis resistance.
        Warning to young ladies:
        If you wear loose clothes, beware of the machinery. If you wear tight clothes, beware of the machinist.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks allot fellas. Im going to be working on the Navy ships, so I can see where corrosion resistance would benefit the ships I work on. Im kinda excited about the new job, but a little nervous because of not knowing what to expect. I guess, I will know what to expect come friday morning though!
          If you want peace, be prepared for war!

          Comment


          • #6
            Good luck on your new job. Attached is a link on welding copper nickel. If you hit the "Page Down" key 4 times you will get to the TIG welding section.

            http://www.copper.org/applications/c...AndFabrication
            Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
            Miller Dynasty 200DX
            Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
            Lincoln LE 31 MP
            Lincoln 210 MP
            Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
            16" DoAll Saw
            15" Drill Press
            7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
            20 Ton Arbor Press
            Bridgeport

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Don52 View Post
              Good luck on your new job. Attached is a link on welding copper nickel. If you hit the "Page Down" key 4 times you will get to the TIG welding section.

              http://www.copper.org/applications/c...AndFabrication

              **** Don, thats a sweet link. I appreciate it, and i will definately have it memorized before I goto work on friday. Thanks again.
              If you want peace, be prepared for war!

              Comment


              • #8
                welding copper nickel

                usmcruz,

                If you want to practice on some small pieces of metal, look in your pocket for US nickels. The composition of the nickel is 25" nickel, 75% copper.

                I have tigged some together using 308 stainless wire and also RN67 wire which is 30% nickel-70% copper.

                Several years ago I saw a large sofa which would seat 4 adults. It was made from US nickels and had a stainless frame underneath made from 1/4" and 3/8" rods to support the structure. Wish I had taken a photo as the welds were smooth and the sofa had compound curves just like a fabric one.
                It was priced at $18,000. The artist estimated he had used about $1000 worth of nickels. Don't know how many hours it took.

                good luck,
                Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, large first aid kit, etc.

                Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                Comment


                • #9
                  How in the heck do you guys find out this stuff. I never knew I had copper nickel in my change jar. I always appreciate your guys input on things. Its funny to see a young welder come into a new shop and act like he's the sh$t, but I find myself on the opposite spectrum listening to the vet welders. Its pretty interesting, to the learn the tricks they have up there sleeves, and all the stories that not even a Marine can top. Im headed out the door now to check out a rod oven, and to get some filler metal tube holders. Thanks again everyone for your help.
                  If you want peace, be prepared for war!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thye coppernickel I worked on in the Navy was often main seawater lines (MSW) or Aux Seawater (ASW).

                    The new material was hard to weld in the fact that it had a high thermal conductivity and if the puddle were overheated it became difficult to manage.

                    Low interpass temps (250 I think) were required. On butt welded pipes purging was performed and often times it was difficult to get the moisture out of the existing material and if it were left, a less than desireable root surface was the norm. We used consumable insterts for the roots which often times left a condition we called "raziorback" in which a tight oxcide formed on the surface of the root and left a sharp edge sticking up.

                    Cleanliness is very important. Avoid sulfur, grease etc.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That must have been a pretty wild looking couch!
                      I'll just have to imagine what it looks like, I don't have the time or the mone... err I mean nickels to do a project like that!!!
                      at home:
                      2012 325 Trailblazer EFI with Excel power
                      2007 302 Trailblazer with the Robin SOLD
                      2008 Suitcase 12RC
                      Spoolmatic 30A
                      WC-24
                      2009 Dynasty 200DX
                      2000 XMT 304
                      2008 Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
                      Sold:MM130XP
                      Sold:MM 251
                      Sold:CST 280

                      at work:
                      Invision 350MP
                      Dynasty 350
                      Millermatic 350P
                      Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
                        Im going to be working on the Navy ships.
                        Will they be providing firearms or do you need to bring your own?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here is a link to the nickel couch:

                          http://www.johnnyswing.com/nickel-couch.shtml
                          Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
                          Miller Dynasty 200DX
                          Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
                          Lincoln LE 31 MP
                          Lincoln 210 MP
                          Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
                          16" DoAll Saw
                          15" Drill Press
                          7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
                          20 Ton Arbor Press
                          Bridgeport

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pipewelder_1999 View Post
                            Thye coppernickel I worked on in the Navy was often main seawater lines (MSW) or Aux Seawater (ASW).

                            The new material was hard to weld in the fact that it had a high thermal conductivity and if the puddle were overheated it became difficult to manage.

                            Low interpass temps (250 I think) were required. On butt welded pipes purging was performed and often times it was difficult to get the moisture out of the existing material and if it were left, a less than desireable root surface was the norm. We used consumable insterts for the roots which often times left a condition we called "raziorback" in which a tight oxcide formed on the surface of the root and left a sharp edge sticking up.

                            Cleanliness is very important. Avoid sulfur, grease etc.

                            Yeah, I read about the importance of cleanliness from the link that Don sent me. That link goes pretty in depth about the welding of copper nickel, and from the looks of it, it can be pretty finicky. Im sure it will be fun to learn the ins and outs of welding it though.

                            One question though, Im used to manually putting in the root, tig or stick welding pipe, but they told me that they use a backer ring. Can anyone explain what the heck a backer ring is, and why I wouldnt have to put a root in using one? I appreciate all of your guys input, it will only make me a better welder.

                            Don, that dime couch is frigin amazing. That my friend is truly a work of art, and even more so, a test of patience!
                            If you want peace, be prepared for war!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Don52 View Post
                              Here is a link to the nickel couch:

                              http://www.johnnyswing.com/nickel-couch.shtml
                              That guy has built some pretty cool stuff, and he was even on junkyard wars!!!
                              at home:
                              2012 325 Trailblazer EFI with Excel power
                              2007 302 Trailblazer with the Robin SOLD
                              2008 Suitcase 12RC
                              Spoolmatic 30A
                              WC-24
                              2009 Dynasty 200DX
                              2000 XMT 304
                              2008 Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
                              Sold:MM130XP
                              Sold:MM 251
                              Sold:CST 280

                              at work:
                              Invision 350MP
                              Dynasty 350
                              Millermatic 350P
                              Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X