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mig movement for good welds

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  • mig movement for good welds

    I saw some pics in the resources section on mig welds that looked like they were tig welded.

    I have been searching for an article or website that shows the different movements like circular or half moons to make a good looking weld.

    Also, what would produce a stronger weld. I have read circles are not as good because your re heating your weld when you circle back.

    If you have pics of welds and the movement or a like that would be awesome. I just cant find it anywhere.
    mm 210
    dynasty 200dx

  • #2
    Well this is strictly my preference and I am not a wlder by trade I am self taught trial by fire so take it for what it's worth, when I MIG I tend to travel the gun in a shallow cresent movement which does tend to make a really nice looking weld in my opinion, now as far as strength I have never had a weld crack or fail visible, but like I said I am not formally trained like some of the guys on here.

    I have a post in projects section titled critique my MIG welds and you can see the result.

    Hope this helped
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    • #3
      I did see that the other day and no one said it was bad so maybe that means its good.

      thanks
      mm 210
      dynasty 200dx

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      • #4
        Originally posted by superdave99gt View Post
        I did see that the other day and no one said it was bad so maybe that means its good.

        thanks
        If you have proper fit-up, you do not need to move your gun around. Push it in the direction of travel (not always possible) with no circles, moons, half-moons or anything else.

        With less than proper fit-up, learn to read the puddle and maintain the puddle.


        Griff

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        • #5
          Odds are if you are doing any kind of manipulation with GMAW on a test, the weld will fail the test almost every time.

          By the same token, if you are not doing critical welds and there is a gap, sometimes you need to work the weld a bit to fill in decently without blowing a big hole or making a mess.

          Depending on the position of the weld, I will use a 'C', 'J', or 'U' stroke as I deem necessary.
          Last edited by Marcel Bauer; 09-20-2008, 09:42 AM.
          "If you build it, they will come!"

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          • #6
            This is always a bit of a touchy subject for beginners... Instead of concentrating on making "welds that look like they were Tig welded" it would be better for you to concentrate on everything else that matters:

            Joint Fit up & pre weld preparation
            Machine Voltage and Wire Feed Speed settings
            Puddle control
            Fusion
            Undercut
            Porosity
            Weld deposit leg and throat
            Weld bead profile, and bead appearance.

            etc etc.

            These will come much harder if you are using half moon, circles, Whoop-Dee-Doos or anything else you can think of...

            The biggest problem with exagerated (sp?) gun movements is that you basically create a string of start/stops along the whole length of the weld. Also of concern is cold lap, and lack of fusion.

            If you are learning, I would suggest you concentrate on what matters, and use a straight push technique. As mentioned before, good fit up is key to a good weld. As you gain experience, then yes, you are able to manipulate yourself to compensate for poor fit up and gaps etc etc, and you will be able to strive towards specific weld profile and bead appearance.
            Last edited by Black Wolf; 09-20-2008, 09:57 AM.
            Later,
            Jason

            Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

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            • #7
              Another note: Push for less penetration and flatter bead with possible cold lap and Pull for deeper penetration and more build up with less chance of cold lap. Hpe this helps, Paul
              More Spark Today Pleasesigpic

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              • #8
                so if anything other than a standard push/pull creates cold lap and other problems then why do people do it.

                I saw a vid on youtube and the guy did Vs for welding vertical up to get good penetration.

                If a standard push/pull up hill wont get good penetration then how would I know when it will and wont.
                mm 210
                dynasty 200dx

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                • #9
                  I wiggle it, weave it, sometimes what ever it takes, run straight, push, pull. One thing I do when teaching this is on steel turn the settings up for one thickness on almost all these small wire machines. If you are on 3/16 set it for 1/4. On about anything 10 Gage and up I am on high with these little feeders and 030. A lot of it I dont mind gaps to add to penetration but I just burn on these things, take a chance and make the machine do most of the work.
                  16 ga sheet to a snowplow frame. I got this machine just blasting and as an operator about all I do is cruise and try not to burn thru it, 250 A feeder running 035, put a couple dozen short welds on the whole thing, 5 maybe 10 mins, dont even got to think about if I am melting. This is the position it was welded in. The door settings are too cold without a lot of operator input.
                  I think the vert part of the weld covered the torch cut from the old sheet removal.
                  Like a fast car, you never find out what it will do unless you step on it.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, I knew this was gonna happen....

                    My post, and I believe the other ones were intended for "in position" welds as in 1F, 2F, 1G, etc. Fillet welds, groove welds, and lap welds.

                    As soon as you get "Out of Position" as in 3F or 3G as in your example, a different technique is required to hold the puddle against gravity, while ensuring proper fusion, and filling undercut all at the same time.

                    That is a good example of where "Weaves" come into play... And there are many, many different accepted, and unaccepted forms of weaves depending on the consumable used and the process in question.

                    Without intending to sound arrogant, you sound like you are at the point where it would be benficial to you for you to aquire some reputable welding resource material from either Lincoln Electric, Miller Electric, or the Hobart Welding Institute.

                    OR,

                    Spend some time looking around the internet.... you will find pretty much all the information you require for free.

                    All the questions you are asking have already been answered on this forum and many others, all you have to do is use the search function.
                    Later,
                    Jason

                    Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Black Wolf View Post
                      Spend some time looking around the internet.... you will find pretty much all the information you require for free.

                      All the questions you are asking have already been answered on this forum and many others, all you have to do is use the search function.

                      You must not have read my first post. I spent over 3 hrs on the internet last night searching for techniques and when and when not to use certain ones and also looking at all the help vids on youtube.

                      I was hoping someone would have a good link to somewhere that provides this info. I really dont want to spen 40 bones for a dvd if I can find a good info provider online.
                      mm 210
                      dynasty 200dx

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                      • #12
                        OK, fair enough. I'll take a few minutes and see what I can find for you.
                        Later,
                        Jason

                        Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          http://www.millerwelds.com/swf/flv/f...=320&h=240&v=8

                          Quick tutorial video right here on Miller's site under "Resources"
                          Later,
                          Jason

                          Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

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                          • #14
                            http://www.millerwelds.com/education/articles.html

                            Access to all the articles you will possibly ever need right here on Miller's site under "Resources"
                            Later,
                            Jason

                            Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

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                            • #15
                              http://www.lincolnelectric.ca/knowle...icles/list.asp

                              Homepage for Lincoln Electric's Knowledge section - access to ever article on the site, including tips for beginners at the bottom.
                              Later,
                              Jason

                              Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

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