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  • 115 230 power cord options

    Hello everyone,

    Great forums, I've been reading all night, but I am unable to find a clear answer to a question I have.

    For a maxstar 150 built prior to the MVP Power Cord, what are my dual voltage power options?

    Obvious to me
    1. Keep the 115 cord factory installed
    2. Replace with a 230 cord

    Not as obvious for me
    3. Can I upgrade to an MVP cord? Does Miller sell it? Does anyone?
    4. Build my own MVP cord (install 230 cord make adapter to take down to 110)?
    5. Anything else?

    Thanks and sorry if this has already been addressed please steer me toward any existing threads.

  • #2
    whatever works best for you.

    many wire them for 220V and make a pig-tail to take it to 120V if needed. depending on the 220V plug option you are using a twist lock 220V plug with a pig tail for 120V and even a 50amp 220V plug, whatever you need is easy and cheap.
    the DVI plugs can be ordered but they are like $50+ look at your needs and build to what you need is always best. if thats putting on a DVI setup go for it.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped
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    • #3
      I have never bought a factory extension cord for a welder. I went to an electrical supply and bought 65' of three conductor 8 gauge cord (end of the roll so I got it for a discount) and added the appropriate male and female ends to meet my 240 v. needs. I can't imagine wiring an extension cord for a 120/240 v. machine for anything other than 240 v. use. It's easy to find 120 v. cords anyway, if you need one.
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      • #4
        I put a 120V plug on my Maxstar because it saw that more often, but it always had a pigtail adapting cord and would get 240V whenever it was available. Personal preference, it really doesn't matter which way you prefer to go. I personally think the MVP adds needless cost to the machine.

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        • #5
          I put a twist lock on my 150 and made up pigtails for everything. The extension cords are all the same twist lock, as well. Just about eliminates the risk of someone plugging in to a pigtail at the wrong voltage (ever see a 4.5 angle grinder on 240? They really don't like it) and no one walks away with my cords on the job. I picked a twistlock that I never see and is cheap.

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          • #6
            First thing if you are going to make an adapter cord my recommendation it so adapt down. Like "enpck" said you don't want to put a 220 volt male end on a cord and a 120 volt female. It does not matter if you are the only one using this cord and it never leaves your garage there is always the chance you could plug a different 110 volt item into it when it is plugged into the 220 and you have a very dangerous situation on your hands.

            What I did is I bought 30amp 220 volt twist locks for my Dynasty and Powermax 30 and made a bunch of extension cords with the same ends. Then I made an adapter down to 110 volt and a couple for other 220 volt styled plugs.

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            • #7
              I think I like the MPV setup, I can use 50A in the shop (although dont need it) but could use other common welder cords if needed and so far I only use the machine on 120 except for a couple test rods.

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              • #8
                I was lookingat a tig that ran on 120 or 240 and my thoughts were this instal the 240 plug onthe welder and put a 240 plug on a 120 so I could plug the adapter in to the 120 and plug the 240 into the adapter.
                This is an automotive discussion forum that has some great infromation

                www.autobodytoolmart.com/shoptalk

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by metalmeltr View Post
                  I was lookingat a tig that ran on 120 or 240 and my thoughts were this instal the 240 plug onthe welder and put a 240 plug on a 120 so I could plug the adapter in to the 120 and plug the 240 into the adapter.
                  240-- 2 hot legs and a ground
                  120--black-hot, white-neutral, green-ground.

                  Is your welder going to "sense" the neutral? Probably not.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WyoRoy View Post
                    240-- 2 hot legs and a ground
                    120--black-hot, white-neutral, green-ground.

                    Is your welder going to "sense" the neutral? Probably not.

                    Why wouldn't it??

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                    • #11
                      Alright ,I used the same plug that came with the machine, a 120 volt 20 amp plug. With that I made an adapter to fit the 240 in my shop (same as what is on the engine drive welders) been doing fine for 5 years .
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                      • #12
                        Yes you can do that and a lot for me would depend on where I was using it heavily. I like the 230 on the machine and adapt to 120 when needed for safety if I was in my shop or connected to my portable for some reason. Too easy, somewhere sometime to plug 120 in to hi. They really solved a lot of headache with the setup now, it was an additional factor in my purchase of a new one vs a good used older machine.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                          Why wouldn't it??
                          Jumping in here since I was going to ask a similar question. I'm _guessing_ that the inverter doesn't really sense the voltage difference as much as not caring. But whatever.

                          Seems to me the others who said a simple pigtail/adapter will do the job are right, while noting that 220v to a 110v standard outlet jack is nuts.

                          I have a Maxstar 140 which I just took a look into, with the manual beside me. The manual, to switch from 110 to 220, (page 17) sez:

                          <quote>
                          <snip stuff about getting to the power switch>

                          Mark location of switch terminals where
                          black and white leads are connected, and
                          note location of ground lead. Disconnect
                          leads from ground terminal and switch.

                          <snip legend>

                          Insert new [220v] power cord through strain relief,
                          and push an extra inch into unit.

                          Connect ground lead and black and white
                          leads to marked locations. Double-check all
                          connections.
                          </quote>

                          Which implies the replacement 220 supply cord has 3 wires: black (line1, hot), white (line2, hot), and ground.

                          Like I said, I took mine apart, but haven't removed the switch yet. However, from the instructions above the wiring is the same, so any properly made pigtail, with hot1 to black, hot2 to white, and ground to green, should work.

                          Is this correct?

                          Thanks,

                          Riley

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                          • #14
                            I'm going to make an unpopular suggestion here with a very valid reason behind it:

                            Wire the machine for 120v with sufficient sized conductors for good current flow, and make an adapter pigtail to 240v.

                            Here's the reason - You're dragging the machine out to a remote location that only has 120v. Do you really want to drag the adapter with you and have to deal with a bulky 240v connector and adapter? I know I wouldn't.

                            In the shop; use the adapter and be sure it can't be mistaken for another 240v extension cord (ie, make it short enough so that you can't mistake what it's plugged into).

                            The argument about not creating a 240v "120v" outlet eliminates any brainpower requirement from the user. Mark the adapter accordingly, and lighten the burden in the field. What happens if you forget to bring your adapter with you?

                            The chances of getting shocked from a faulty neutral connection in a power tool are pretty much the same if it's 240v or 120v. Hot current is jumping either way or it wouldn't have a path to shock you. 240v just means it's flowing both directions. In fact, 240v would be the safer of the two because a neutral short to ground would likely trip the breaker where as it wouldn't do anything on 120v unless there was a GFI installed.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Fishy Jim View Post
                              I'm going to make an unpopular suggestion here with a very valid reason behind it:

                              Wire the machine for 120v with sufficient sized conductors for good current flow, and make an adapter pigtail to 240v.

                              Here's the reason - You're dragging the machine out to a remote location that only has 120v. Do you really want to drag the adapter with you and have to deal with a bulky 240v connector and adapter? I know I wouldn't.

                              In the shop; use the adapter and be sure it can't be mistaken for another 240v extension cord (ie, make it short enough so that you can't mistake what it's plugged into).

                              The argument about not creating a 240v "120v" outlet eliminates any brainpower requirement from the user. Mark the adapter accordingly, and lighten the burden in the field. What happens if you forget to bring your adapter with you?

                              The chances of getting shocked from a faulty neutral connection in a power tool are pretty much the same if it's 240v or 120v. Hot current is jumping either way or it wouldn't have a path to shock you. 240v just means it's flowing both directions. In fact, 240v would be the safer of the two because a neutral short to ground would likely trip the breaker where as it wouldn't do anything on 120v unless there was a GFI installed.
                              Not the best idea. 120V plugs and outlets are only rated for 125 V. The prongs are to close together which could a flash over if slightly exposed on 240V. On a 120V system current flows both directions on both the hot and neutral! The Neutral is tied to the ground at the panel so that you are not likely to get zapped by touching it. The grounding path, if intact, will allow the current to go back to the panel rather than through you.

                              Now here's the kicker, if you are playing weldor at a friends house, you can do what you want; however, if you own your own business, and pay workman's comp, or tend to get visited by OSHA, any 120 V receptacle you plug into will need to be GFI protected. They are also having fits over field fabricated cords, all need to be molded plugs now. So, if you are on the part time welder bit, make a 240v plug on the welder, and an adapter to go to 120 (these can be bought from RV stores fairly cheap). If you are a pro welder, try to buy the MVP cord cap set from Miller and retrofit.
                              John


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