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  • vertical

    anyone ever asked to do a vertical bead w/ a 6011 root pass, all from down to up!, not a weave as I thought it was alway's to be, goes against my trained logic, maybe need some insight. thx

  • #2
    you're post is a little hard to understand but I think I get the gist of it...

    Use a whip motion with 6010/6011. If you can mig uphill you can stick uphill. It's the same concept just don't lose your arc.

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    • #3
      i was tought to always go down to up! but using a 6010 doing a vertical bead the best way i found would to just do small circles real slow with a short arc lenght!

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      • #4
        Yep down to up on all vertical welds it allows the crap to fall out of the weld area. You'll see this speced on 7018 structural stuff. And it was the way i was trained too.
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        • #5
          Doing a small weave is possible to do uphand. Just turn the heat down a bit, go slow and watch for undercut. It might be harder but your weld joint will be definitaly stronger than a downhand bead.

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          • #6
            don't turn your heat down. that's cheating. if anything turn it up a little. As a rule of thumb, anything 3/16" and smaller can be welded downhill without any disadvantages. vertical pipe is another story completely.

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            • #7
              In the shop I work at if you get caught welding anything at all vertical down you'l get the @ss chewing of a life time. We usualy try as hard as we can though to move the weld joint into the flat position.

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              • #8
                This is common and if one cant run up with a 6011 they are missing the basics, way too many people trying to weave where they should be whip and pause, and,,,,, I rarely consider the position, this is a place to learn to do it right. A friend wanted me to help him,, but it works better for me this way or that way, well, ok, but he wont be able to do it right should the need arise, might be ok in the back yard but wouldn't get it on a job or be able to pass a test.
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  Sberry, Not to bust on you I just want to learn. On a scale of 1 -10 10 being perfect how do you rate those welds? I ask because my 6010 vert up looks a lot like that and I thought I was doing something wrong. I only got about 1/2 and hour of vert in class at the end of the semester so I could try it over the summer and have a starting point. Maybe I'm doing better than I thought! When I get the chance to play I'll run a few and let you all pick them apart. Thanks.

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                  • #10
                    These were during a lesson to demonstrate various techniques. I need time to picture some nicer ones and different kinds of stuff. In my world this is passable, no one wonders WTF. I wouldn't mind seeing some nice beads by some daily drivers, my work is so rudimentary all single pass seal or structural general fab stuff with poor fit up, really basic so I don't get a lot of practice, very little.
                    No, these are not great beads and wouldn't know how to rate them but is intended the best I can to demonstrate the technique for puddle control with this electrode in all positions. Welding flat doesn't much interest me.
                    With all these a proficient operator could improve the appearance substantially, the first pic is one bead top another, second overhead fillet, 3rd and 4th no bevel open butt with the 4th being overhead, point being how the operator can control the melt thru adding the filler in the joint. You can see on a job, handrail or pipe or plate the weldor can compensate for fit up, etc.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      I posted some a week or so ago about a simple piping job we did, very rudimentary fit up with a plasma and minimal grinding. We did the welding single pass like a speed demon, ideally I would had 5/32 electrode but it needed to be strong and not leak, we didn't even chip the slag before burial. Most of these pros could weld miles without a leak on this type of joint, with this type of weld not much extra filler, no big pile of weld on top, very useful filling a crack or gap, may never see that there was a poor fit up, ha.
                      When it can be done at will efficiently in all positions it becomes a marketable skill, huge asset to any mechanic.

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                      • #12
                        Once we got going you can see how the melting at the root is taking place with the welder stacking the filler in the joint one stroke at a time. A minor issue is old electrodes stored on the side, they do burn erratic.
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by Sberry; 04-24-2008, 08:36 PM.

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                        • #13
                          I really dig 6011 uphill. Actually, I prefer any weld verticle rather than flat. But, thats how Dad taught me. Overhead, thats a different story... I'll leave that to the pros.
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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the picts and the info Sberry. I don't do much with stick but you never know when it might be needed. I can think of one or two times in the past that Welding stick would have made life a lot simpler.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mcgilacoty View Post
                              As a rule of thumb, anything 3/16" and smaller can be welded downhill without any disadvantages..
                              Is this true ?

                              Can I weld some brackets on my car that are 3/16th to my 1/8 frame vertical down ?

                              I'm ok on the up but real good on the down

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