Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

120V or 240V MIGs..?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 120V or 240V MIGs..?

    Yeah yeah I know. I don't even have my shop wiring started yet, but I keep thinking it might be nice to have a MIG to do some of the monotonous stuff I do now with the tig.

    My experience with MIG is limited. I welded a little in school; never got very good at it - although I didn't get very good at stick then either and I'm much better now. I used my friends 110 Harbor Freight MIG a few years ago and that seemed like a piece of junk.

    Until I got my Maxstar 200, I never believed 120V welders could be any good.

    So what's your guy's thoughts on 120V migs (Miller/Lincoln). Typically I am welding 1/8" wall tubing, but sometimes I weld stuff up to 1/4"; all mild steel. I have done two SS jobs (1/16" walls) and one aluminum (1/8") job in the past 4 or so years.

    Dumb question of the day: What is the difference between MIG and wire feeder?
    Last edited by tasslehawf; 03-29-2008, 01:47 PM.
    Miller Maxstar 200 DX
    RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
    Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
    Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
    Hitachi 4.5" grinder
    http://mhayesdesign.com

  • #2
    I have a Lincoln SP135 Plus you are welcome to try


    1/8" - sure

    1/4"- Lots of joint Prep needed and really out of the 120v range- I think duty cycle is about 2 seconds

    I have done quite a lot of 3/16", but Joint prep is needed there as well.


    If you are going ahead with the Sub panel I would say wait and get a HH187 or HH210- twice the machine for not that much more $$

    If you look at how the Power is supplied:

    a 20 amp 120v Circuit only provides 2400 watts of Power

    a 20 amp 240v Circuit provides 4800 watts of power

    Any hint of 1/4" stock and it should be a 240v Machine.
    Ed Conley
    http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
    MM252
    MM211
    Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
    TA185
    Miller 125c Plasma 120v
    O/A set
    SO 2020 Bender
    You can call me Bacchus

    Comment


    • #3
      " MIG"
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_metal_arc_welding

      "Fluxore"
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux-cored_arc_welding

      Both of the above processes are Wire Fed

      "Stick"
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shielded_metal_arc_welding

      "Tig"

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_tungsten_arc_welding
      Ed Conley
      http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
      MM252
      MM211
      Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
      TA185
      Miller 125c Plasma 120v
      O/A set
      SO 2020 Bender
      You can call me Bacchus

      Comment


      • #4
        Small 120 volt migs have their place. I at times do iron railings. Build the panels in the shop with the larger unit.......take the 120v unit to the job site for assembly in the field. Works for me.........
        Nick
        Miller 252 Mig
        Miller Cricket XL
        Millermatic 150 Mig
        Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
        2-O/A outfits
        Jet Lathe and Mill
        Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
        DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
        Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
        20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
        Propane Forge
        60" X 60" router/plasma table

        www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
        Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
        and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Iron Head
          Being as you asked!

          Unless you’re going to be another weekend warrior, who will spend more time wiping the dust off his machine than welding, don’t bother with a 120-volt machine! 240-volt minimum!

          Just my 2-cents.
          I'm a tig guy all the way, but I would like to get some experience with the mig and use it to do some of my more functional and less delicate welding. Probably most on 2x2x.12 steel sq. tubing.
          Miller Maxstar 200 DX
          RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
          Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
          Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
          Hitachi 4.5" grinder
          http://mhayesdesign.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
            Can a MIG do flux-core? Why does Miller sell MIG welders and Wire Feeders? The Wire feeders and setup to do MIG and flux core?
            Miller Maxstar 200 DX
            RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
            Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
            Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
            Hitachi 4.5" grinder
            http://mhayesdesign.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tasslehawf View Post
              Can a MIG do flux-core? Why does Miller sell MIG welders and Wire Feeders? The Wire feeders and setup to do MIG and flux core?
              In a general sense yes as it's generic term for the machines like the MM140, 180 210 etc. as they do both: GMAW- wire with gas AND FCAW- Fluxcore wire- no gas and they are stand alone machines.

              Wire feeders- need to be connected to a Power source like a Bobcat ( I think a Bobcat works) or other machine like an XMT 350
              Ed Conley
              http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
              MM252
              MM211
              Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
              TA185
              Miller 125c Plasma 120v
              O/A set
              SO 2020 Bender
              You can call me Bacchus

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
                Wire feeders- need to be connected to a Power source like a Bobcat ( I think a Bobcat works) or other machine like an XMT 350
                Ahh. That makes sense.

                I think if I happen upon a cheap 140 (miller, hobart, lincoln) I might just have to pick one up.
                Miller Maxstar 200 DX
                RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
                Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
                Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
                Hitachi 4.5" grinder
                http://mhayesdesign.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  My first MIG was a 120V Millermatic 135. With proper preparation, it is quite capable of welding .250 stock. I did some test welds on .250 x 2" flat bar: a butt weld using a double V-groove (welded both sides) and a fillet on the same material. The section and etch proved that the butt weld was solid, but the fillet did not have the penetration I would have liked. Interestingly, I was coached on the procedure by members of this board!

                  If I had beveled the perpendicular member, it probably would have been a satisfactory weld.

                  This was with ER70S-6 and 100% CO².

                  With the little MIG's, the weldor needs to shine!

                  Hank
                  ...from the Gadget Garage
                  Millermatic 210 w/3035, BWE
                  Handler 210 w/DP3035
                  TA185TSW
                  Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    120v not

                    I feel that for even small shop with multiple machines the 120v units are mostly for portability. Like Monty said they are good for field welding and light installations.

                    The dual voltage machines to me set the minimum. You can go 120v in a pinch, but there is no substitute for amps.

                    No matter how nice a tuxedo you put on a jackas* it's still a jackas*

                    A strictly 120v machine is marginal. What you can possibly do taking time to perfectly fit up etc, you can do in seconds with 20 or 30 more amps.

                    Look at it this way, does anyone here regret stepping up to the next level machine or think maybe they should trade down? Not likely.

                    Get your electrical service together, you will not regret it.
                    Last edited by Handy560; 03-30-2008, 10:10 PM.
                    John

                    Thunderbolt AC/DC
                    MM 175
                    Maxstar 150 STL
                    Blue Star 185 DX
                    Spectrum 375

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree, the 240V is twice as good, far superior.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well then 240 it is.

                        Why is it that with TIG welders now it's common to see these inverters that can take any input voltage, but with MIGs there are just a few that are multi-voltage - most are one or the other..?

                        I think I'm going to borrow my friends HF 110 mig in the mean time and see what I can get it to do. Can't beat Free.
                        Miller Maxstar 200 DX
                        RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
                        Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
                        Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
                        Hitachi 4.5" grinder
                        http://mhayesdesign.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Its expensive to build multi voltage features into a machine, would drive the cost up and afford ability is one of the key points with the small machines.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tasslehawf View Post
                            Well then 240 it is.

                            Why is it that with TIG welders now it's common to see these inverters that can take any input voltage, but with MIGs there are just a few that are multi-voltage - most are one or the other..?

                            I think I'm going to borrow my friends HF 110 mig in the mean time and see what I can get it to do. Can't beat Free.
                            Those tigs a very expensive tho. As is the Passport mig which you should consider as an upper end option. IMO

                            www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                            Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                            MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                            Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                            Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                            Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                            Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                            Miller WC-115-A
                            Miller Spectrum 300
                            Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                            Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                              Those tigs a very expensive tho. As is the Passport mig which you should consider as an upper end option. IMO
                              I guess I'm just thrown off because there aren't any tigs in the same sub $1000 price range as migs.
                              Miller Maxstar 200 DX
                              RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
                              Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
                              Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
                              Hitachi 4.5" grinder
                              http://mhayesdesign.com

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X