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  • wrenchit
    replied
    Hole saw info

    For what its worth I recently found out that MK Morse makes Ace Hardware brand Bi-metal holesaws. MK Morse brand bandsaw blades have outlasted anything I have tried in the past on my Wellsaw bandsaw. Their products seem to be very durable, pricey, but you get what you pay for these days...

    Wrench

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  • Bert
    replied
    Vicegrip,
    thanks, saw the pic. Looks like he just clamped a backing plate over the old hole using metal or wood to guide the hole. Yes, now I feel like....duh!

    bert

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  • Vicegrip
    replied
    Originally posted by Bodybagger View Post
    http://www.acetoolonline.com/product-p/irw-90188.htm

    You can get a 1-3/8" high speed steel Silver and Deming drill bit for around 30 bucks. Or you could probably borrow one from a machine shop with a few bucks to cover wear. The job will be done in less time than it would have taken to get halfway through the first hole with the wrong tool for the job.
    why is a hole saw a wrong tool? (Just my opinion and YMMV) I have both types and still use hole saws when doing any large dia metal drilling free hand and sometimes even on clamped stock in the press. Hole saws are the go to when drilling large holes in thin sheet stock or through a stack of thin metal when making something in bulk. For me, when drilling metal, a bit of that size is drill press with worked well clamped only. It will turn your drill (and perhaps a thumb) around the first time it grabs and the break out at the end of the cut is a bear unless you clamp some more stock to the back to drill into. A hole saw takes a lot less HP to make a large dia cut as it is removing a thin ring of materal rather than removing all the materal in the "hole".

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  • Vicegrip
    replied
    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    ok, stupid here....won't the vice or clamp be in the way???
    I just noticed this image. Check out the image in post #13. He is using a plate with a guide hole. My discription not nearly as clear as a single image.

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  • Bodybagger
    replied
    Break down and buy a bit!

    http://www.acetoolonline.com/product-p/irw-90188.htm

    You can get a 1-3/8" high speed steel Silver and Deming drill bit for around 30 bucks. Or you could probably borrow one from a machine shop with a few bucks to cover wear. The job will be done in less time than it would have taken to get halfway through the first hole with the wrong tool for the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bert
    replied
    Vicegrip

    ok, stupid here....won't the vice or clamp be in the way???

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicegrip
    replied
    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    Sberry,
    yeah, good question for us new guys. If you have an old hole, and no plug to weld it back in, how do you make a bigger hole, since you can't use the pilot bit?
    thanks
    Drill a hole in some wood or plate metal and clamp it on the spot where you want to drill the new hole. The wood or plate acts as a guide. I use this method a lot as it makes it easy to eyeball where the edges of the hole will be, you dont have to spend any time making the pilot hole in thick metal and I tend to wear the pilot bits out before I run out of hole saw bits. You can cut larger and 1/2 moons

    Only a welder can "move" a misplaced hole!

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  • HMW
    replied
    Thats one tuff cordless drill

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  • Bert
    replied
    Sberry,
    yeah, good question for us new guys. If you have an old hole, and no plug to weld it back in, how do you make a bigger hole, since you can't use the pilot bit?
    thanks

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  • shortarc
    replied
    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
    Here is a common one, the hookup here is 3/4 and a bushing and special pin is always needed so I re-cut the hole to 1" so we use our common typical setup. I rarely use a drill bit or even a press on holes larger than 3/4, I clamp things to the bench so I can push or most often doing it in place on the machine such as this one. Super fast, easy and leaves a nice looking hole.
    What do you use as a pilot when enlarging a hole like that? Or do you use a mag drill?

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  • fun4now
    replied
    nice work Sberry.
    is it your farm or you working for some one else. if you just work there i bet you have saved then big $$'s being there in the repair shop/biz. you often have a simple, quick solution as apposed to the normal longer drawn out option. always neat to see your work.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    Here is another bucked modification, made it interchangeable for a couple applications. I think I even measured one wrong, welded the plug back in, moved it 1/4 inch and re-cut it. No big deal.
    Attached Files

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  • Sberry
    replied
    Here is a common one, the hookup here is 3/4 and a bushing and special pin is always needed so I re-cut the hole to 1" so we use our common typical setup. I rarely use a drill bit or even a press on holes larger than 3/4, I clamp things to the bench so I can push or most often doing it in place on the machine such as this one. Super fast, easy and leaves a nice looking hole.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I have cut hundreds in plate with hole saws, I use light lube like rapid tap and only a few drops per 1/8 inch of thickness and usually don't bother with a drill press. You can drill to about 1 1/2 or so fairly well by hand. In 1 1/8 it cuts about half inch a minute easily and I primarily use a battery drill, here is a cut after 20 holes, still cutting 3/8 in 35 seconds with oil 3 times.
    I use them all the time to cut over size holes, even weld up worn holes and re-cut. I use for repairing worn holes in draw-bars on tractors, use it similar to a ream. I had worn holes in a loader bucket the other day, they were originally 1", I started a 1 1/8 saw in them, cut them oversize at about 20 seconds a hole and put oversize pins in, saved hours of difficult rebuilding work.
    Attached Files

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  • Jim-TX
    replied
    Thanks for looking.

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