Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is the best way to weld this thick plate on homemade log splitter?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    I've had split wood go flying. Not from a weld break, but from pressure building up (26 ton ram) and the I-beam flexing, then the log splits and BANG it goes flyin'. I stand out of the way or put my boot against the log when I have a stubborn one. Just have to be careful.

    I agree though, if a weld failed it most likely would tear loose, not snap off. I'd still be careful though when you hear the gov. kick in & the log starts to creak.

    Comment


    • #32
      I've re-welded torn loose ones before...the factory built ones aren't anything special. They just tear open when they go.

      www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
      Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
      MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
      Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
      Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

      Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
      Miller 30-A Spoolgun
      Miller WC-115-A
      Miller Spectrum 300
      Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
      Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

      Comment


      • #33
        yeah if it comes off it'll just peel off. Just weld it you'll be fine. Its not a huge deal to weld it on. Beveled nice, couple of good passes and it'll be better than what is sold out there.
        Scott
        HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by HMW View Post
          yeah if it comes off it'll just peel off. Just weld it you'll be fine. Its not a huge deal to weld it on. Beveled nice, couple of good passes and it'll be better than what is sold out there.
          Exactly, go check out the log splitters from China and you will see that you have nothing to worry about, scary.
          Owner of Burnt Beard Fabrication & Welding Ltd.

          BigBlue 500D
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 211
          4' Box and Pan Break
          IR compressor

          Comment


          • #35
            i would use the flux-core. it has more tensile strengh than 7018. just dial it up a bit & go for it. i have used supreme 71 with excellent results. the chain is a safe bet. 35 yr, welder.........fiberman

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by fiberman View Post
              i would use the flux-core. it has more tensile strengh than 7018. just dial it up a bit & go for it. i have used supreme 71 with excellent results.
              I don't know that the difference in 70ksi and 71ksi is that big of a difference. The drawback is that you likely won't get as good penetration with fluxcore.

              Comment


              • #37
                Go FCAW

                Everyone has opinions on this. hope it's not too late to throw mine in.

                You could weld it with Kryptonite wire, and it's not going to be any stronger than the base material - which for the wide flange beam is probably 50,000 psi yield point and the wedge plate is probably 36,000 psi, so it would be no stronger than the lesser of these two. That said, no matter what the tensile strength of the deposited weld material, porosity, voids and brittleness near the leading edge (where the joint is in tension) will allow the wedge to peel off like a zipper. Therefore, unless you are REALLY REALLY good with a stick and you can guarantee no slag inclusion (which happens to the best of them), I'd recommend .045 E71T-GS because it penetrates like 7018, is inherently low-hydrogen, doesn't make a lot of slag to get included in your weld, and gets into tighter bevels than stick welding. Be aware that Lincoln innersheild has a 5/8 thickness limitation. But with any method, preheat evenly... until your spit just starts to sizzle when it hits the steel.

                Take off those tacks and cut a bevel at the bottom of the wedge. A 45 degree opening will work for FCAW, but you'll have to cut 60 degrees with stick, which means more filler metal. But whatever, it's crucial that you get that bottom to an edge. If you don't spend 40 dollars on a spool of E71T-GS, just use E7018 rods and be very careful to clean the joint real well between passes. Don't try to lay down any more than a 1/4" bead in one pass.

                In summary:
                If you doubt your ability to make excellent welds in the horizontal position with E7018 rods, go with E71T-GS .045 because the results will be better.

                E7018 rods are medium to low penetration. FCAW done correctly penetrates as good. Solid MIG will NOT penetrate this weld with your equipment. There are exceptions to any rule though... my Lincoln Power Wave 455 will MIG weld this in one pass on each side (at 500 amps) - but the 3 phases of THIN wires going into it are probably 2 sizes larger than the THICK wires coming out of your machine.

                Sizzling spit is a good preheat indicator for your thickness.

                Cut a nice sharp V in the bottom of your wedge or you will have headaches no matter what method you use. I figured this one out at 60 tons and you really nead a full penetration weld, unless you want 1 1/4" fillets all around.

                80% of failures are from 20% of causes
                Never compromise your principles today in the name of furthering them in the future.
                "All I ever wanted was an honest week's pay for an honest day's work." -Sgt. Bilko
                "We are generally better persuaded by reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others." -Pascal
                "Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything." -Pascal

                Comment


                • #38
                  So you are saying that any E71t-GS has no pass limitations?
                  And that all Lincoln Innershield has a 5/8 plate thickness limitation?
                  Jeff

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    How did you figure 60 tons? I could not find the cylinder diameter or pump pressure in the descriptions.

                    I am thinking of biulding one with about 40 tons of force in the future, maybe add a loading arm.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Guys it's a wood splitter...limited by its size. Not a press. A sharp edge will do a lot for durability. Any halfway decent weld by a competent craftsman will outdo the junk on the market for sale. I think a 100% bevel is overkill on this.
                      A brace behind the part would do more than anything.

                      I am pretty sure it's already finished and working anyhow

                      www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                      Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                      MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                      Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                      Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                      Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                      Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                      Miller WC-115-A
                      Miller Spectrum 300
                      Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                      Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                        Guys it's a wood splitter...limited by its size. Not a press. A sharp edge will do a lot for durability. Any halfway decent weld by a competent craftsman will outdo the junk on the market for sale. I think a 100% bevel is overkill on this.
                        A brace behind the part would do more than anything.

                        I am pretty sure it's already finished and working anyhow
                        Now don't let common sense spoil the fun
                        Jeff

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I am sure his next post is going to be "how do I builld up and hard face the cutter that I wore out by splitting 3 million logs?"

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I think he ought to melt it all down and forge it into one solid piece. Beam and wedge all in one
                            Lots of great thoughts, but gosh its a log splitter, not the space shuttle. Poor guy will never ask a question again
                            Scott
                            HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by HMW View Post
                              Poor guy will never ask a question again
                              Why, too much speculation? Nothing more fun than 500 answers to a simple question
                              Jeff

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by J hall View Post
                                Why, too much speculation? Nothing more fun than 500 answers to a simple question

                                Its all good
                                Scott
                                HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X