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  • #31
    Dan that's a heck of a deal, thank you. I'm not saying no, but I plan to keep checking out the home front here, simply because its a lot cheaper living here not having to pay full rent and utilities, etc. Its funny, I almost asked you today about what's involved in getting certified in Alberta instead of BC, you must have read my mind. Must be that electric lettuce So you say 3 years to get journeyman status there? Would that be the equivalent of our A level? I'm a bit confused now, because you also mentioned your B and CWB? I thought you guys just got your Journeyman status and then did your PWPs and CWBs, do you have the C,B,A, levels too


    no disc yet, but I'm sure its half way here by now, that or in Moosejaw this time Thanks again for that disc

    Coalsmoke, not so dazed but plenty confused
    hre

    Comment


    • #32
      tickets

      Well pipeline is partly right I myself went to Alberta got my hands on training in Edmonton but I did it a little different;I went to north Island college for my C level then left school went to work for go getter welding in nisku.After a year went back to north Island college got my B went back to nisku and worked for mastco derrick services then left after a while moved to surrey and went to kwantlen did my A and then went to Itac wrote my IP my point to all this is you are far better off getting your welding training here but to become the best welder fitter go back to Alberta. Now that's not to say that if you decide to stay here that you can not become the best at what you do you can, but it's going to take working for the right company thats the hard part.As for challenging it's not easy.I would say go talk to BOB at kwantlen he is the instructor at night 5pm to 10pm mon to fri.King george Hwy and 74 ish ave????
      you'll see a bunch of cars parked on both sides of the road on that street just walk in it's okay.O ya dealing with Itac on a challenge test that's a long process. you need proof of welding,proof of what positions,proof of what rods you where using,proof from employers,proof of joint type,position,plate size now this is the interisting part if you can not prove any of this you can go to lawyer and swear on the good book that you can do this and Itac will except that, but you should at least a couple of employers on your list.all colleges have this modular program now it's brutal if you dont keep up your out.
      Anyway go talk to bob he will help you.most of all dont get discouraged



      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Darmik View Post
        Well pipeline is partly right I myself went to Alberta got my hands on training in Edmonton but I did it a little different;I went to north Island college for my C level then left school went to work for go getter welding in nisku.After a year went back to north Island college got my B went back to nisku and worked for mastco derrick services then left after a while moved to surrey and went to kwantlen did my A and then went to Itac wrote my IP my point to all this is you are far better off getting your welding training here but to become the best welder fitter go back to Alberta. Now that's not to say that if you decide to stay here that you can not become the best at what you do you can, but it's going to take working for the right company thats the hard part.As for challenging it's not easy.I would say go talk to BOB at kwantlen he is the instructor at night 5pm to 10pm mon to fri.King george Hwy and 74 ish ave????
        you'll see a bunch of cars parked on both sides of the road on that street just walk in it's okay.O ya dealing with Itac on a challenge test that's a long process. you need proof of welding,proof of what positions,proof of what rods you where using,proof from employers,proof of joint type,position,plate size now this is the interisting part if you can not prove any of this you can go to lawyer and swear on the good book that you can do this and Itac will except that, but you should at least a couple of employers on your list.all colleges have this modular program now it's brutal if you dont keep up your out.
        Anyway go talk to bob he will help you.most of all dont get discouraged



        Thanks Darmik. A past kwantlen student told me they were going or adding to the current modular style an the apprenticeship system too, not sure if he knew what was really going on or not though. Do you happen to know if the King George location is going to move to the Cloverdale centre too? I know that the Langley one is apparently moving there this coming September. I was thinking that is where I would end up doing my training, just because its closer to me.

        I appreciate the information about challenging the level. Its weird because I have downloaded the forms off line, but they don't seem all that intensive, yet its hard to find more info out from the ITA and the instructors I have talked to so far don't seem to want to spill the beans. I'll go talk to Bob or one of the guys at the Langley Kwantlen and see where it sits. No worries about keeping up with the program, surprised that it would be brutal though. I guess if a person wasn't picking up something like overhead FCAW and only had a week to work on it, that could be a bit frusterating. Is that what you mean by the modular system being rough?

        I get what you're saying about the fitting aspect. I can say from past experience, there is not a lot of fitting that seems to happen here, not precision stuff at least, a lot of "good enough" attitudes is what I came accross, like meatball surgery. That's one of the reasons I opened my own business, because I knew of a couple customers wanting better work for their money, even if it took longer. Which leads me to my last question, think I'll be able to use my own business for work experience once I complete the school training aspect?

        Thanks again Darmik, I appreciate the info.
        hre

        Comment


        • #34
          get'er done

          Coal Id say come here and get your ticket, Alberta is know'en to have some of the best welding tech schools in the world, I've been told if you have an Alberta ticket you are the top in the world for welding that was from an American with that said there still is real good welders from BC, Sask, Man etc etc. You very well know that having an Alberta ticket is good on an
          resume. The thing is no matter where you get your ticket, the longer you wait
          the more money you are loosing I know its easy for me to say cause I've
          got it and I dont have to pick up and move to come here. I also understand
          you have to look at the the pros and cons. I hope I dont come off as c*cky
          or a know it all. I d just like to help ya.
          DODGE 1 TON 6.7
          PIPEPRO 304
          TO MANY TOOLS
          JUST WELDING IN CIRCLES
          rig welders are like wheelbarrows hard to push around
          and easily upset
          go flames go

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by pipeline Dan View Post
            Coal Id say come here and get your ticket, Alberta is know'en to have some of the best welding tech schools in the world, I've been told if you have an Alberta ticket you are the top in the world for welding that was from an American with that said there still is real good welders from BC, Sask, Man etc etc. You very well know that having an Alberta ticket is good on an
            resume. The thing is no matter where you get your ticket, the longer you wait
            the more money you are loosing I know its easy for me to say cause I've
            got it and I dont have to pick up and move to come here. I also understand
            you have to look at the the pros and cons. I hope I dont come off as c*cky
            or a know it all.
            I d just like to help ya.
            Hey no worries about that, I really appreciate the offer. I'm just mulling it all over in my head at the moment. Do you know what the approximate wait times are there to get into a welding program? Its about a year here from what I am gathering, maybe even a bit more. If there is more work there than there is here, then I could afford to work and go to school, might be able to make enough to pay rent and tuition, or is it set up there that you do your 3 years as a working apprenticeship so you get paid for it?

            Last question for the morning, do you have to scale your truck? I noticed the Alberta scales said must scale at 4500KG, I'm a bit over that, if they caught up with me over there I might be in a pickle.
            hre

            Comment


            • #36
              Coalsmoke

              I been playing a little internet roulet here trying to figure out what this welding apprenticeship is all about. I didn't even know B.C. had it until reading it here. My take is that the old '7/3/2 month C/B/A Level' system would take a totally green novice and turn him into a well-rounded pressure welder able to test to several procedures and processes. All of the skills he developed having been taught in the school itself. The apprenticeship program on the other hand would have an on the job employer do most of the teaching with the student being in class for only one month a year to do the written and practical tests. The wishful advantage of this is that this would free up class space and thus be able to push more students through in the same given time. The downside appears to be that apprentices aren't getting enough on the job training to advance to the next ticket when testing time comes and so end up getting frustrated and dropping out. Now the kicker here is that as of Jan 1, 2007 the federal gov't is offering something called "Apprenticeship Incentive Grant" which amounts to $1000 cash for completing each of the first and second year. Maybe you could challenge year one, complete year two, and pick up a couple grand.

              Comment


              • #37
                when i did mine I had to hold my c ticket for ten years before being able to challenge the B and A level maybe things have changed now . I challenged all three levels . for a challenge i would try Bcit no waiting list there i got in right away to do my cwb .I would challenge the C level at bcit once you get the papers sworn testimony thing you can do this at a notary public
                buy the books on the c level the modular books and study them as the written test has alot of the questions on them .the c level wasnt very hard it was a 7018 root and 6010 to cap on overhead on i think 3/8 plate with a backing bar it would take you about 3 weeks to pass this test to be proficient there was a flux core flat and wire root down and fill and cap up on 3/8 or 1/2 plate as well . the wire was open root . if you have any questions call me but to get in right away bcit is the way to go . though IMO the training at kwantlen is better . plus the instructors are willing to work on the side if you ask them to train you at your place to save time try rob nelson in surrey he is a very knowledgeable likeable guy . I used him on my cwb for a bit .
                Miller aerowave full feature
                Lincoln power mig 300 with prince gun
                dynasty 200 dx
                lincoln sp 135 plus
                302 trailblazer
                s22p12
                powcon starcut
                cp 400 metal spray

                Comment


                • #38
                  Hey dandimand I took my A level with rob maybe he is the sharpest tool in the shed with the C and B level but with the A level I had to talk to the instructors on the night shift because rob just did'nt know or forgot.

                  Hey coal If all you want is to get a CWB cert any school will take you at any time go see bob night or rob on days.
                  o ya kwantlen ( surrey campas) is also moving to cloverdale.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    NAIT Welding

                    I did the entire welding course from the comfort of my home. NAIT is offering welding as a Distance Delivery course. You sign up with the Apprentiship board and register with NAIT, the notes are sent to you as a package with CD or VHS for visual training aids. When you get your hours in and want to test call NAIT and go in and sit your tests. 2-3 days per year for the practical tests and in the 3rd year a WPQ test and the IP you're done and done. With your skills already far beyond most students in the classrooms this may be the way to go. And if Pipelin Dan is ready to sign you up you could be up and running in less than a year, deppending on how fast you go through the writen tests.

                    My employer (Parks Canada) thought the course was great in the fact that they didn't have to send me to school for 2 months every year. I was at school for about a week for the entire 2 years I took to complete the course.
                    A Failure To Plan On Your Part,
                    Is Not An Emergency On My Part!

                    When you build something Idiot Proof..
                    Someone builds a better Idiot!

                    Scott S.
                    Jasper AB
                    Canada

                    Dynasty 200DX

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Hey pcwelder I started my cooking appren at the villa caruso restaurant with tom and leta after there I was there for about 1 year then ray lovel at the sawridge hotel signed me up and finished and became a chef there and had to go to Edmonton to write my IP.Irene is the band cheifs daughter she calls her self the tiger lady ( what a B!tch and I do mean that) but you know something if you get on her good side she will give you the world or her part of it anyway.I had a lot of fun there even at the athaby bar or at champs bar at the hotel.I sure have some good memmories there.


                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Distance Delivery

                        I also took the distance delivery program. I have nothing but good things to say about it. I was able to work through all the theory at home and then went in to do the practical and written exams at the Souch campus of NAIT's. When talking with the instructors they said the biggest problem was with people staying motivated enough to finish the program.



                        Byron

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Jasper times

                          Darmik

                          Atha B has turned into a Cougar Bar and Champs is Kareoke central on Thurs nites. Ray Lovel is in Nunavut running an art gallery The town hasn't changed that much since you were here but real estate is insane 285 for a trailer and Cabin creek is in the low 600 thous.

                          Distance delivery is the way to go if you can stay motivated, that is for sure and if you have a good Journeyman to work with there is basicaly nothing stoppin' you
                          A Failure To Plan On Your Part,
                          Is Not An Emergency On My Part!

                          When you build something Idiot Proof..
                          Someone builds a better Idiot!

                          Scott S.
                          Jasper AB
                          Canada

                          Dynasty 200DX

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by pcwelder View Post
                            Darmik

                            Atha B has turned into a Cougar Bar and Champs is Kareoke central on Thurs nites. Ray Lovel is in Nunavut running an art gallery The town hasn't changed that much since you were here but real estate is insane 285 for a trailer and Cabin creek is in the low 600 thous.

                            Distance delivery is the way to go if you can stay motivated, that is for sure and if you have a good Journeyman to work with there is basicaly nothing stoppin' you

                            I worked at jasper park bungalows in the summer sanding the log cabins for john and his wife john died from a propane explosion dont ever check leaks with a lit match he!! of a nice family.
                            A friend of mine used to own rooneys pizza on the main drag it was next door to a native arts and crafts store good pizza the family moved back to Egypt
                            when I was there I rented an apartment for $ 400 mo just up from the esso station and past the L & W restaurant they have good pasta there. they used to have nooners pizza for $4.00 not bad.I had a good career there untill I meet up with the X wife so we left went to Edmonton where her dad promised me a job with CN rail so we moved and well you guessed it never worked one day for CN so that is where I change careers and went to become a welder/fitter sh!t that was back in the late 80's(88,89 early 90's).
                            Anyway I dont know how long you have been there but hopefully your having
                            as much fun as I did?. O ya before I foget that rec centre good place to pick up chicks not the kind with feathers.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by OldSparks View Post
                              I been playing a little internet roulet here trying to figure out what this welding apprenticeship is all about. I didn't even know B.C. had it until reading it here. My take is that the old '7/3/2 month C/B/A Level' system would take a totally green novice and turn him into a well-rounded pressure welder able to test to several procedures and processes. All of the skills he developed having been taught in the school itself. The apprenticeship program on the other hand would have an on the job employer do most of the teaching with the student being in class for only one month a year to do the written and practical tests. The wishful advantage of this is that this would free up class space and thus be able to push more students through in the same given time. The downside appears to be that apprentices aren't getting enough on the job training to advance to the next ticket when testing time comes and so end up getting frustrated and dropping out. Now the kicker here is that as of Jan 1, 2007 the federal gov't is offering something called "Apprenticeship Incentive Grant" which amounts to $1000 cash for completing each of the first and second year. Maybe you could challenge year one, complete year two, and pick up a couple grand.
                              Oldsparks, thanks for the info about the $1000 grants, I'm going to look into this, see if its only for the apprenticeship programs or is for any passing student. I wonder if this means BC and other provinces will be getting more into the apprenticeship models? It would be nice, would get more people out into the field, or at least might give guys in training a better idea of what goes on in the field.

                              Originally posted by dandimand View Post
                              when i did mine I had to hold my c ticket for ten years before being able to challenge the B and A level maybe things have changed now . I challenged all three levels . for a challenge i would try Bcit no waiting list there i got in right away to do my cwb .I would challenge the C level at bcit once you get the papers sworn testimony thing you can do this at a notary public
                              buy the books on the c level the modular books and study them as the written test has alot of the questions on them .the c level wasnt very hard it was a 7018 root and 6010 to cap on overhead on i think 3/8 plate with a backing bar it would take you about 3 weeks to pass this test to be proficient there was a flux core flat and wire root down and fill and cap up on 3/8 or 1/2 plate as well . the wire was open root . if you have any questions call me but to get in right away bcit is the way to go . though IMO the training at kwantlen is better . plus the instructors are willing to work on the side if you ask them to train you at your place to save time try rob nelson in surrey he is a very knowledgeable likeable guy . I used him on my cwb for a bit .
                              Dan, apparently no more challenge for B and A levels, or else I'd have something to shoot for here. Only can challenge C level at the moment, but who knows with the ITA, they change their mind every few months Thanks for the advice. I'll let you know if I decide to go the challege route. I'm working on a coupon bender for the sake of practice, although I don't feel the practical tests would give me too much problem, maybe the fluxcore if its overhead, but not if its any other position, unless its something like 3/32 vertical, never run wire that big before. Not even sure if you could run wire that big vertical.
                              hre

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by pcwelder
                                I did the entire welding course from the comfort of my home. NAIT is offering welding as a Distance Delivery course. You sign up with the Apprentiship board and register with NAIT, the notes are sent to you as a package with CD or VHS for visual training aids. When you get your hours in and want to test call NAIT and go in and sit your tests. 2-3 days per year for the practical tests and in the 3rd year a WPQ test and the IP you're done and done. With your skills already far beyond most students in the classrooms this may be the way to go. And if Pipelin Dan is ready to sign you up you could be up and running in less than a year, deppending on how fast you go through the writen tests.

                                My employer (Parks Canada) thought the course was great in the fact that they didn't have to send me to school for 2 months every year. I was at school for about a week for the entire 2 years I took to complete the course.
                                Originally posted by bjfab View Post
                                I also took the distance delivery program. I nave nothing but good things to say about it. I was able to work through all the theory at home and then went in to do the practical and written exams at the Souch campus of NAIT's. When talking with the instructors they said the biggest problem was with people staying motivated enough to finish the program.



                                Byron
                                Ok guys, thanks for the info, this has got my attention perked. Why isn't BC doing something like this, probably because it makes too much sense I have been looking into this distance learning, it sounds like a perfect fit for what I am wanting to do, only thing is that I can't seem to find it listed by NAIT. Am I looking in the wrong place? http://www.nait.ca/portal/server.pt/...?CalendarID=96

                                Last question for the night, what is the IP test I hear you guys talk about. Is that a inter-provincial aka red seal?
                                hre

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