Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Broken Head Bolt In My Flathead Ford

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Several companies make rods specifically for bolt extraction. I have two brands, one from Rockmount and it might be the certanium brand, called extractalloy. I’ve used both successfully. Problem is, I have almost 10 lbs of the extractalloy and I might have used a dozen or so sticks since I’ve had it and it was expensive.

    Glad to hear you got it running though.

    Leave a comment:


  • WillieB
    replied
    I've done a good many with TIG. I build up a ball on the broken bolt. When the ball is big enough, I can grip it with Vice Grips. At first, move so little you can barely tell you tried. Wiggle back & forth as long as it takes, or it breaks off. Should it break off, weld another ball on. Each cycle of heating & cooling will serve to shrink the male stud & crush the rust. Might take a few cycles of welding a ball on before you free it up.

    Certaneum once made a stick rod specifically for this. They claimed the flux would protect the female threads if the stud was less than flush.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris401
    replied
    Originally posted by smawgmaw View Post
    Any update on this thread?
    My plan worked and the tractor is up and running. I ground the broken bolt flat in the hole with the bit pictured earlier. Drilled out the bolt and chased the threads clean. I free handed the drilling due to wobble in the drill press.
    Thank's
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20211025_201331.jpg
Views:	150
Size:	3.29 MB
ID:	618005

    Leave a comment:


  • smawgmaw
    replied
    Any update on this thread?

    Leave a comment:


  • walker
    replied
    I wonder if using a punch and just going clockwise into the jacket would have worked.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I should have kept a coffee can of broken bolts and fittings I removed. I have drilled a few and did one a little while ago, was feeling frisky and picked up the drill and punched straight thru. If you are using a buzzer 3/32 7018 is the real way to fly. But,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, I understand your spot.
    There are some tricks and been doing this along time, probably in the hundreds. The auto hood has made this a lot easier.
    One of the tricks about metallurgy,,, not that I know anything but the lock washer is just hard enough to add a little carbon to the mix and increases the twisting power. Click image for larger version

Name:	bolt removal.JPG
Views:	188
Size:	28.2 KB
ID:	616301

    Leave a comment:


  • tarry99
    replied
    My Experience in many of these repairs is you only get one good chance at the extraction and that's usually the first attempt.........From there it's downhill and turning into garbage quickly.........If it warrants I'll stick in the mill.......If there's room and access, I like grinding a little nub or flat spot in the center of the bolt with a small HS burr.....then take a sharp center punch and make a nice indent / point and from there if your successful you can start with a sharp cobalt 1/8" drill and work your way larger as your staying 90 degrees to the block until just the threads and a small margin of the original bolt remains......the first hole needs to be straight..........there with a little heat and a pick it will usually curl itself out with no damage to the original thread. Chase it and your done!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris401
    replied
    I forgot to say Ryan that I don't have any wire feed yet. I use an old cracker box. Once I get this old tractor burning oil again I can build a decent slab in the shade to work on. Hope to get back on it this after noon.

    Sberry, there is a handy tool called a tap extractor. I am sure we could all beat our chest over our triumphs in our field of expertise. I do good if I can get myself out of my own messes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    They can be done in the hole. Click image for larger version

Name:	tap washer.JPG
Views:	237
Size:	22.0 KB
ID:	616294

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Being a through hole will make it a little easier to clear the threads out of you end up drilling through it.

    Helped a friend with an EGR delete on his Ford a few months ago, everything went fine until we broke both of the little 6mm bolts off the exhaust flange. All he had at his shop was a little mig machine, I must’ve tried 6 or 7 times to weld a nut to those studs and never budged them. We ended up drilling the bolts out and tapping the holes to 1/4-20 for holding blank plate on the old hole.

    Little jobs like this can make you crazy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris401
    replied
    In my previous carrier I've gotten a quite few out over the years by welding a piece of steel or nut to it. I've learned something like this in a cooling jacket can be larger with corrosion where the bolt is exposed to the coolant. Forcing it though the threads has a potential to crack what your removing it from. This is the first time I can remember when it hasn't worked for me. Like my first post said it is broken below deck, nothing to weld to. Might as well accept the first two breaks and take your time on the third try. I am made some progress with the bit I bought today.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20210730_152917.jpg
Views:	312
Size:	2.45 MB
ID:	616288 Click image for larger version

Name:	20210730_152758.jpg
Views:	316
Size:	2.55 MB
ID:	616289

    Leave a comment:


  • walker
    replied
    Sometimes you have to try more than once to weld them out. I guarantee I could get that out by welding a nut to it. I used to keep a bucket with all the broken bolts I got out for customers, until it just got too big and heavy. Try again, turn up the heat. You will not weld it to the block, because that is likely what you are worried about, so turn the machine up a fair bit. This is likely a 5-10 minute ordeal once you have done a few.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I would mig it out
    I may straighten out a lock washer so it doesnt grab, that first, then a flat then a nut.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    An old 8N....very familiar with your woes there. That bolt has only been in there for 70 years man!

    I’ve never used an end mill in a mag drill, my guess is you can spin it fast enough for it be effective, but worth a shot I suppose. I’d probably pick a HSS end mill at that low of a speed. If you go easy with a center drill or a spot drill and get a good start on the bolt then you can be successful.

    I figure the worst case is you end up drilling the hole oversized and putting an insert in. Not ideal, but what other option is there at that point?

    There are some welding rods that are designed for welding to a bolt down inside a bolt hole. The flux is non-conductive and the rod is directional. I’ve had success with those in the past, but they’re expensive and you probably can’t just buy one or two. It seems like you may be over that stage though. If you want to give some a shot, I can mail you some. I sent some to another guy a while back.

    Keep us posted on your progress, lots of stuff here to learn from.

    Ya, Tarry, nice BP for sure!

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris401
    replied
    Welded it a couple of times. The second time broke it off below deck.

    This is on an 8N tractor. If the block wasn't between a dozer blade and a backhoe then taking it to a machine shop would be my best option. I am going to use the drill I have to bore it out.
    Last edited by Chris401; 07-30-2021, 06:22 AM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X