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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I’ve had some pretty good results by using the chemical aluminum cleaner as has already been stated. You could also give it some preheat and maybe burn more of the nasties out.

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  • racerx
    replied
    One thing i did notice while wiping it down with acetone the rag had a lot of black residue.

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  • racerx
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Is the pan cast aluminum?
    No......it one of the fabricated custom pans.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Is the pan cast aluminum?

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  • racerx
    replied
    You no i thought about that and for that reason i decided not to use the compressor ,i getting ready to go and have my tanks filled and ill ask about the acid wash.......Thanks for the response.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by racerx View Post
    The pan was properly prep washing ,heating,i even use crab cleaner to get rid of any oil residual, stainless steel brush asatone cleaner.
    Welding bare aluminum ( unused) but old has its own needs for cleaning before welding......right off the shelf material an easy home run..........Oil pans are just filthy little devils.......I clean them several times....quarter car wash is a good place to start......then it's scrubbing the area with chemicals and grinding back the area your going to fix.........once, twice and when done cleaning do it over again....I then like to use a chemical acid wash on the part.........available at most welding stores it's also sold as an aluminum cleaner.......flush with water and plenty of it and air dry only.....

    Why not dry with your air compressor? Compressor's have lots of fine particles of oil coming down the line......and there's a good chance that you'll recontaminate the part without knowing it ...good luck!

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  • racerx
    replied
    I'm going ask this ? on this thread instead of starting a new one, sense it's pertain to tungsten well I'm using the 3/32 2% lanthanated seems to work well. problem now is that it seems to be carboning and it will not mirror (pupal) to add filler rod the machine is set at 75amps -100 amps there's no difference wondering if grounding is a problem? The pan was properly prep washing ,heating,i even use crab cleaner to get rid of any oil residual, stainless steel brush asatone cleaner.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    I watched a video explanation of a distributor cap and rotor, with an explanation that accounted for the deposit that accumulates on the post of the cap.
    Getting back to the cap and rotor. Moisture was a big factor for accumulation. Cold air and hot spark. When you weld aluminum, cold surface hot arc. I'm seeing something in all this. .
    Carbon arcing...........and then the dust that follows is quite common and more so in today's High performance ignitions systems like MSD where between 20 to 50 amps is jumping across terminals from the rotor to the cap at high RPMs....try turning the lights off in the shop while the car is running.......quite the light show sometimes and a good place to look for electron leaks even in the spark plug wiring harness.

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  • Noel
    replied
    I watched a video explanation of a distributor cap and rotor, with an explanation that accounted for the deposit that accumulates on the post of the cap. I don't remember it well, but it had to do with temperature, arc plasma, and voltage over time. I mention this because when your welding with GTAW, pretty much the same thing results.

    Discussing unstable arcs, and tungsten types, those pure tungsten and the forming of a balled end, not only does the ball radiate electrons, it lack a point to direct them. Unstable until the voltage over comes the effect. Contamination and self cleaning, again, unstable arc, but also as mentioned with the cap and rotor, if the tungsten doesn't dispel the particles of plasma contamination accumulation, that leads to an unstable arc. To much current, over heating the tungsten and things again become unstable. Erosion and splitting, plasma particle contamination increase, then add in arc length?
    So all that particle stuff behind the ball or the pointed end...or what collects on the surface, a component of that making is the power source, wave form and balance.
    You recognize unstable, the choice is to find a tungsten that for your needs is less likely to be unstable.
    Going back to the Miller Diversion 180 and your choice for tungsten. Good luck with that selection. They all do the same thing just better or worse under different conditions.

    Getting back to the cap and rotor. Moisture was a big factor for accumulation. Cold air and hot spark. When you weld aluminum, cold surface hot arc. I'm seeing something in all this. It may be the tungsten is of less importance then you think? I'm not say it is, just that you also have to think of how the welding gets done.

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  • racerx
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post

    I have to ask, how would you describe a unstable arc? This seems to be what's at issue and if you describe that, it could indicate if the balance is off, current is to high, arc is to long, or gas shield was to low to be effective? A picture surely wouldn't hurt.
    Sorry for the slow response …….

    To me an unstable arc is when the actual arc is use to form a pupal to add filler material, with that said the actual arc it self jumps around. When I look at videos there seems to be a very stable arc.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Generally speaking, on AC and as far as I can tell, the way the tip decomposes effects the arc quality. The decomposition of the tip is much more evident at higher amps. When the tip gets those strange nodules on the end, and you’re running at the higher end of that tungsten size amperage, those little nodules get to quivering and eventually pop off and into your weld.

    Might I ask, how are you preparing your tungsten for AC welding? It will not hold a point, so you can forget about that. But you may consider grinding your tungsten to a blunt, steep angled tip, then balling that tip a bit. If you can get a nice little ball on the end of your tungsten then your arc will be much better off.

    Arc starting on AC is always a bit wonky, especially on low amps.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by racerx View Post
    Thanks for the response Gent's I can't seem to get a stable arc with the purple, tried the green it was better, but could not really put it though the test due to tank running out of argon going to replace that 20 lbs. bottle with a 80.think ill pickup a 2pc. pack of the blue while I'm there…..
    I have to ask, how would you describe a unstable arc? This seems to be what's at issue and if you describe that, it could indicate if the balance is off, current is to high, arc is to long, or gas shield was to low to be effective? A picture surely wouldn't hurt.

    Leave a comment:


  • racerx
    replied
    Thanks for the response Gent's I can't seem to get a stable arc with the purple, tried the green it was better, but could not really put it though the test due to tank running out of argon going to replace that 20 lbs. bottle with a 80.think ill pickup a 2pc. pack of the blue while I'm there…..

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I don’t really notice much difference between any of them on DC. I ran the purple for a good while today welding up an aluminum fuel cell for drag car. I really like that purple on AC.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    In my shop we now have only two colors Blue and Purple. I like Purple for steel and stainless and blue for Aluminum. The blue holds the ball real well and is resistant to mild contamination. On Aluminum I use 3/32 for 3/16 and thinner, 1/8 for the thicker stuff. As Electric4Life says be patient, wait for it to melt BEFORE you add rod. Wait for it to mirror then add rod and go go go. Have fun, welding aluminum isn't harder than welding steel it's just different.

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