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  • Electric ATV

    Hey! My 11yo son asks me to buy a car for him but he's too small So I thought to buy an ATV. I always wanted a car when I was a boy now I want to make my son's dreams come true. But I'm a newbie in this don't know how to choose the best one. My son asks one with sports car design But what should I take into account when choosing electric ATV?

    Thanks everybody to join this conversation, now I'd like to share my opinion. So I've been looking for an electric ATV which both my wife and son would like and it was not so hard as we expected. After reading dozens of forums and posts like this one (a pretty good one detailed review) https://www.kidsatvsale.com/electric-atvs-for-kids/ we decided to buy a Razor bike with hand brakes that looks like a real ATV. Now my wife is happy, my son is happy, that's the main point. The ATV is solid, the battery is enough for 1-hour ride. When he grows up we're thinking of switching into gas ATV as some of you advised. Hope this will help anyone! ​​​​
    Last edited by Jack32; 08-28-2019, 03:12 AM. Reason: extra

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jack32 View Post
    Hey! My 11yo son asks me to buy a car for him but he's too small So I thought to buy an ATV. I always wanted a car when I was a boy now I want to make my son's dreams come true. But I'm a newbie in this don't know how to choose the best one. My son asks one with sports car design But what should I take into account when choosing electric ATV?
    https://improb.com/top-28-best-electric-cars-kids/

    I'm not going to steer you away from one, but at 11, it's almost time for something with a gas engine? I bought a brand new Yamaha PW50 for Christmas one year, 5 years later when the kid grew out of it I resold it for what I paid as the price had risen enough that it was still a good deal at that dollar number. Name brand hold some value. Off shore imports, not so much.

    I posted the picture of the Mini Cooper Power wheels and the tire upgrade, that's a popular upgrade as the plastic tires offer limited traction on grass and gravel. Another is 24volt motors to increase the fun factor and speed.
    I bought it cheap as a non runner, took it apart, cleaned, greased, oiled and got it running again. I wasn't expecting that I would, but I did.

    Battery life can be a limiting factor, always good to have a spare. Like most anything with a battery, if you don't allow for a full and proper charging, the battery life span diminishes and they are expensive to replace. The Cooper has to be plugged in to charge, some you can remove the battery which makes it easier then taking the whole car In for servicing. Things like lights and radio, I'd avoid those gadgets.

    I can't offer advice on which is best, what I will suggest is remembering the kid grows quickly, and they won't forget you buying them that first car.

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    • #3
      Just watched a few of the electrics with REMOTE introduced the children's Oncology Department at Golosano. I'd love to slow strangle the salesman who got fat on that deal even more after reading Noel's link. In that environment they are a Godsend.

      For a kid who isn't sick or disabled, I'm against such. At 11 the kid is being crippled developmentally by such a device, and my opinion is the device itself is an ego trip for the parent.

      Use by the kid will be limited to how long till the next toy arrives between his ears and is armtwisted out of dad.

      Second reason I'm against is Kid preservation! Plastic is definitely strong, we had a demonstration a few weeks back when an inattentive “driver” rolled her car over 2 kids in a plastic wagon pulled by their dad. That's a hazard you factor in with kids regardless how well the kid is behaved. ALL kids screw up, it's natural.

      I also contend one of the most valuable things a boy can have is the ability to tell his buddies “My dad would kill me” in those hey lets do this pre-disaster conferences. That line lets the boy say no and walk away without loosing points in his group.




      At age 11, I'd get the kid some wheels, a motor and some tubing and find a way to help him put his own car together.

      Comment


      • #4
        You know Franz, I think the difference is in where we live and when we lived. Where I live, I'm sure you could drive a power wheels, E scooter electric bike and the like and no one blinks and eye. Won't even hear if your coming or going. Try doing that on a Honda 50 or a Briggs and Stratton anything.

        I'm kind of in agreement on the ego thing of ownership up to a point. But that's like looking over the fence holding a shovel to say, that old guy owns a grader? Two speeds forward and reverse lol. I'm surprized you don't have a little John Deer driving the property?

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwEV6GoIDxI

        That all said, kids are kids. I'd like to think it prepares them to being behind the wheel? A few bumps scrapes and bruises is par for growing up, and a plastic car crash is a lesson that might instill the point that unsafe driving hurts. While a few suffer the results of the genetic pool being slightly different and do stupid, most survive. Helmet or no helmet. But they are a poor investment, they don't make you richer other then in the heart, mind, and soul. doesn't pay the bills but it can make you smile, laugh and cry.

        I think I'm flipping mine for car parts. Lol, I'm a bad grandpa. Grand daughter asks, I'll tell her it was repo'd.

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        • #5
          Geez Noel, ya just reminded me of my 3 wheel electric golf cart. I didn't like the price of a new set of batterys, so I hung a Homelite bomber GPU in back connected it up and called it a Hybred. Wasn't really all that loud with the Homelite muffler, and was kind of fun for a while. Definitely the only hybred at the shows so they put in a golf cart rule to require extra insurance.

          Quick and dirty, if I was building with an 11 year old, he'd already be pulling the electric power unit out of a battery driven floor scrubber and getting it ready along with the speed control while I looked for inventory to frame the thing.
          I don't hold with buying kids things like this, they don't learn anything beyond demanding and guilt tripping adults.

          Yes, I assembled the little woman's grandson's red wagon. She was forced to admit her precious son and all the wife's relatives were too dumb to assemble it. job would have gone a lot better with little Dilbert helping and he would have learned something in the process. Instead the only one who learned was the little woman..

          Comment


          • #6
            A fella doesn't like to think about it but mobility, or lack of, it's a bit of a game changer, for kids or grown ups. They ever take your bike away for being bad lol? They did mine. I learned that before I got a drivers license.
            I'm thinking however, that if I have lots of grass to cut, attach a push mower to the power wheels and have the kid earn their keep? Not unlike the bike you posted, just the upgraded version for the times.
            Or buy a ride em mower and miss a step like me. I do have to get it running one of these days. Needs a carb kit and starter.
            I bet none of those relatives owned simple hand tools? It's lucky they have you, handsome and handy is a winning combination. Over the top is you make bread and own a grader. I'm the guy with the shovel looking over the fence.
            We hope the best for little Dilbert. Know it or not, you made a positive difference in a child's life, that what counts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Mowers is a sore subject. I have a collection of Ford 120s a couple Massey Furgesons, a genuine REO the mandatory Cub Cadette and 5 blown Kohlers sitting waiting to become one good engine. Bicycle is another sore subject, had a new one way back, coaster brake, and the Freshair Kid we got for the summer demonstrated Brooklyn combat bike riding. Didn't much matter to me cause it was too big for me to ride anyhow, but I didn't have a bike till I walked over to the dump and bought enough components to make myself one.

              Old man got annoyed about something and refused to let me take the car, so I walked about 15 miles to the girlfriends place and her dad hauled me back the next day. Loss of mobility, what's that? I been moving on 2 feet and a stick since 72, might be a little shaky on a ladder but I get there.
              Built a grader cause it was better than getting the driveway leveled with the loader. Dilbert and I ain't allowed together. Grampa Ed his mom's GF was one of his caregivers and taught Dilbert evil things like hammer, screwdriver and wrench along with rasberry and proper farting. Nobody breathing lets me near Dilbert even though Ed died. Dilbert's father owns a pretty complete set of tools if he didn't sell em, he also did his best to never learn to use them.

              Lot to be said for only owning a shovel, kind of hard to break and only minimal maintenance. Watched a good man with a pick, shovel, wheelbarrow and 2 planks dig a perfect hole 14 x 14 6 feet deep years back while all the enginincompoops figured out how to get a machine in to dig that hole.
              He had it formed up before they figured out how to fill it with concrete.
              Ain't much a man can't accomplish if he's willing to learn and work a little.
              Lot of good education comes learning what didn't work too.

              Comment


              • #8
                [QUOTE=Franz©;n601124
                Lot of good education comes learning what didn't work too.
                [/QUOTE]

                That is true wisdom.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Noel View Post

                  That is true wisdom.
                  My Grandmother was a wise woman.
                  She taught me to see all that came before my eyes and hear all I could as well.
                  She also taught me to remember because the learning would cost more the second time.

                  First wife was a Master Organist who like to have killed me loading, unloading and hauling her music cases.
                  I never understood why because she could play near anything from memory, or fake it so good nobody caught her.
                  She could also count cards from a 2 deck shoe playing Blackjack. Casinos in AC put 2 pit bosses on us along with the cameras and couldn't figure out what she was doing. They were sure it was something to do with her fingers moving. Any skilled organist could have seen Bach was being played in her head. She even played sleeping. Casino payed for her new Toyota.

                  You live, you learn, and if you're lucky you stay warm, eat well and laugh more than you cry.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Franz© View Post

                    My Grandmother was a wise woman.
                    She taught me to see all that came before my eyes and hear all I could as well.
                    She also taught me to remember because the learning would cost more the second time.

                    First wife was a Master Organist who like to have killed me loading, unloading and hauling her music cases.
                    I never understood why because she could play near anything from memory, or fake it so good nobody caught her.
                    She could also count cards from a 2 deck shoe playing Blackjack. Casinos in AC put 2 pit bosses on us along with the cameras and couldn't figure out what she was doing. They were sure it was something to do with her fingers moving. Any skilled organist could have seen Bach was being played in her head. She even played sleeping. Casino payed for her new Toyota.

                    You live, you learn, and if you're lucky you stay warm, eat well and laugh more than you cry.
                    My buddy called about the car. I said yea, we will work it out and yea, I know winter is coming just like Christmas. Followed with some assurances it was good to go, I'm trading for car parts.

                    My Baba was a wise woman as well. I know because I'd get to hear those gems of advice from my mother.
                    "If your kids only cause you half as many tears...".

                    I feel sorry for those that didn't.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jack32 View Post
                      Hey! My 11yo son asks me to buy a car for him but he's too small So I thought to buy an ATV. I always wanted a car when I was a boy now I want to make my son's dreams come true. But I'm a newbie in this don't know how to choose the best one. My son asks one with sports car design But what should I take into account when choosing electric ATV?

                      Thanks everybody to join this conversation, now I'd like to share my opinion. So I've been looking for an electric ATV which both my wife and son would like and it was not so hard as we expected. After reading dozens of forums and posts like this one (a pretty good one detailed review) https://www.kidsatvsale.com/electric-atvs-for-kids/ we decided to buy a Razor bike with hand brakes that looks like a real ATV. Now my wife is happy, my son is happy, that's the main point. The ATV is solid, the battery is enough for 1-hour ride. When he grows up we're thinking of switching into gas ATV as some of you advised. Hope this will help anyone! ​​​​
                      Hello Jack,
                      Speaking from one extreme to the other. For our son an electric ATV would have been a good idea. After a week the one hour charge would have lasted a few days. He never had a deep interest in his bike or the rough and tumble type. He was more into learning and listening to adult conversation. My mom said that was not fair as I was at the other end. Nothing was ever fast enough and after an accidental roll over I starter rolling my gocart on purpose. You know your child best and hopefully his is closer to our sons pier than mine.

                      Comment

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