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  • Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    EXPERIENCE is what we call the mistooks we survived and crawled away from.
    A guy can never get to many experiences in, the close ones from the mistakes make for interesting stories.

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    • NEVER argue with a woman who carrys a big torch!

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ID:	605352I couldn't agree more.




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ID:	605360Couple hours of You Tube and I'm a bit more educated. At least enough to figure out how it comes apart and take it apart. Turns out the guy I got it from didn't watch the same video?
          The other one is a oily pig, it can wait for another day to be looked at but I will be soon enough.

          This stuff is actually pretty basic as far as taking it apart and it going together it seems, further made complicated only by an extended effort to "beef up" what exists.

          Nothing other then a previous owners attempt to remove the rotors which caused some minor deformation should require a need to replace what's existing.

          My take on things is past replacing bearings and seals, check both end play and housing /rotor clearances, not much to do but add gears and a snout.

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          • ​​
            I'm not sure why, but suffice to say it seemed like a good idea. I didn't send it out for machining like the guy in the video. Done with simple tooling it seemed to me a simple task to accomplish. It was.


            Mark drill and tapping wasn't hard. What was, finding shorter screws. I didn't but I have the thread tapped for them when I do procure them.


            ​​​​
            The idea is to keep the pully/dampener from coming off if the bolt decides to loosen or the pin shears. I thought it was a solid idea. I might not have done it however if I had pulled the crank pully and replaced the spring pin when it was easier to do before it was reassembled and while the weather warmer.


            Live and learn.


            ​​​​
            I didn't need to further educate myself on blowers. But I have been. Doing so I discovered a few things. One of those things was it wasn't hard to take them apart. A slight modification to a steering wheel puller was all it took.


            I did give them a pre clean degreasing bath in the garage, allowing them to dry over night before a final wash in the kitchen sink the next day with hot soapy water.


            ​​​​
            Seems these gears, missing from the first blower I disassembled, are a pricy item to purchase when missing. Everything else however is seemingly re-useable, easily found for repurchase, or can be remade with some creative effort.
            Effort...the missing link.
            They say a blog is when you want to talk and no one want to hear you speak. This is that.
            I don't need the promo to show I can be busy or have other interests beside welding. I do though.
            So I'm calling it fully quits with a final wrapping up to this conversation I'm having with myself, what I started in a question, and where it went in answering it.
            How long does it take a guy? I guess it depends on the effort one's willing to give to the cause.
            As simple as it gets in answering that question.
            A recent post to the forum talks about repairing a trailer with GTAW. It took 28 posts to get a solid reply.
            Longer then I expected in post count. Worth the wait as well.
            Really...28 posts before someone said, not a good idea and why. Two likes for what was a solid effort to explain. He, FusionKing, should be give a standing ovation and called back for an encore.
            Those who know anything about performing such repairs were probably left shaking there heads at the idea of GTAW and that repair being performed with the process. I know I did. My thoughts on it not being a bright idea, I know I wasn't the only one thinking so.
            Hat's off to you FusionKing. Your reply took the time to extend a greater effort and I applaud you for it.
            Hopefully preventing someone else from making that mistake, if buddy thinks at all about it, he might just realize before he gets in even deeper that going further in the same direction won't benefit him or the trailer.
            Caught in a rip tide of inexperience, combined with a lack of knowledge, some misunderstanding... Buddies swimming, starting to panic...everyone is yelling swim harder. I'm now the guy thinking, didn't you read the sign?
            They say what doesn't kill you makes you smarter. He will weld it. I have no doubts. And he will GTAW it.
            Wait and see.
            You want to know what's really funny... a similar attempt was posted on the forum a couple years back. I recall responding to it. I read this post and wondered if it was a reactivation of a old post to breath some life back in the forum? Not saying it is, or was...just saying it's the internet, buyer beware.
            But
            he will be extending energy until he drowns in the failure or accepts in hind sight there was a better way. The previous post I mentioned it was the latter admitting to the former for the reasons FusionKIng mentions.
            As I get older, I find I have less time left to offer wasted efforts.
            While I'm tired of flapping my wings ( the Butterfly effect) , If I made the wind flutter a bit in posting for a couple years, all good is how I see it.
            So be clear, I don't think it was a total waste.
            Heck...
            I received some very positive feedback to my attempts at passing along a little higher knowledge, which was appreciated greatly. It kept me active in the forum.
            Not enough however for the grief always defending my stance or the position I'd taken on the many occasions when I wasn't being Miller forum popular.
            I was also proven wrong on a rare occasion. Remember Hygroscopic? Lol.
            Over two years I did get a couple to three wrong. Most however were right.
            Truth be told, I'm just an average smart guy. I don't have all the answers. I'm still learning and willing to learn. Also listen.

            But I did ask a question.
            So
            putting this to rest once and for all...
            my answer to my question of how long it takes a guy to do something is, "longer then you'd expect if your effort isn't being put to good use".

            Mine hasn't been and I'm changing that. Welcome 2020.















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            • Normally, it should take 15-25 hours to completely dismantle a car if you are competent. But if there are any tools you are lacking, the car has heavy damage, rounded off bolts etc you could double that time.

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              • The quote has nothing to do with how long it will take, but rather how much they can get in perceived value. Ten to fifteen grand is easiky the going rate for a hot rod paint job, so that is what they bid. Personally I wouldnt drive a dar with that kind of money in paint, so I paint my own stuff. It is pretty decent, cost is under a grand easily, and I am not worried to drive it or park anywhere.

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