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  • #16
    Like this
    Bob Wright

    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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    • #17
      I have a boat that we have been building for a guy for 3 1/2 years now.
      I bothers everyone how long it's taking
      But It's right in there with the Singer.

      www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
      Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
      MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
      Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
      Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

      Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
      Miller 30-A Spoolgun
      Miller WC-115-A
      Miller Spectrum 300
      Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
      Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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      • #18
        Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
        Like this
        Just like that. Didn't the future seem bright back then?
        How come we all don't have jet packs, I'm left wondering...? I'm holding on to the hope of still seeing something great develop for man's quest to conquer the skies. Somewhere between self driving cars and drone technology it's bound to happen, but will they allow it and when? Those flying squirrel wing suits are something eh?

        I can only guess the depth of work involved in building a boat? I say guess because I have a set of study plans for a 38 footer. A Stadline 38S. A number of things attracted me to the design. Choice of steel or Aluminum construction. Single performance or eco friendly twin screw diesel engines for power. Safety of the righting moment. Big one however was method of ground up construction with no need to turn or flip during the build.

        Still lots of work. Looking at the Singer, thinking of the boat, it's going to be worth the wait. I have no doubts.

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        • #19
          I always wanted to build a boat. never thought I could weld good enough for one. That was my thought 40 years ago. I know I can. I welded on enough barges...Bob
          Bob Wright

          Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
          http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
            I always wanted to build a boat. never thought I could weld good enough for one. That was my thought 40 years ago. I know I can. I welded on enough barges...Bob
            Sounds like you have one on the go now! A boat that is. One of your own one day you and me hopefully? My list has a home built bi-plane however. SE 5-A. 3/4 scale so I can hide it in the yard.
            I know money doesn't buy happiness but a lack of slows a guy down.

            Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post

            Pretty soon you will be up to 80 machines like me. Yes it is a Singer 503 Rocketeer. The machine is just a reskinned 403. The "Space Race" was going on and Singer took advantage of it and redid a few lines of machines to keep up with the new fad. Sort of like "Streamlining" an old roadster. My oldest is an 1886 and my newest is 1984 which is a modern, (then) computerized Swiss made work of art. And I make parts that you can't buy anymore in my shop. They are like old cars, find them, fix them and sell them.

            Lol!!! I own 12 cars so I'm not calling the kettle black. I was thinking when buying a 5th welder things were getting out of hand however. I think it all goes back to a penny collection?
            I have a $15 Elna Lock from a garage sale. I know it works and functions, just not with all 5 threads at the same time I guess? Lesson learned with more reading. Not enough to do those pillow cases but you now know where the red thread came from.

            Hard to believe the space age was so up and coming back then and we are now making the mark on Mars. I liked the styling. The future appeared bright and full of promise. Some where after Avocado green and shag carpet things started going south?
            Speaking of Swiss watches, I have a buddy who's a watch and clock master. Makes a good buck with Rolex's. He has that attitude, find them, fix them and sell them. I just seem to keep stuff? I'm envious of the lathe. A very handy tool to own. I have a box of swivel castor, the wheels needing a shave due to flat spots.

            While not speaking more on the back story to be said regarding the small Rolex parts pictured, I did take the cover of the Elna off for a look inside. Never having taken a sewing machine apart, hat's off to you. That's some small moving parts. I said, so that's where that cord goes if it gets oiled and I put the cover back on.
            If the need arises I hope you don't mind my seeking your expertise in that area. One day I'll step up for some different color thread and give it another attempt. lol...it's on my list.

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            • #21
              So you're saying that collecting coins is where I went wrong?

              www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
              Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
              MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
              Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

              Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
              Miller 30-A Spoolgun
              Miller WC-115-A
              Miller Spectrum 300
              Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
              Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                So you're saying that collecting coins is where I went wrong?
                No, but if you collected them, you grew up during a time when people did collect things. People with hobbies and interests? Boy Scouts, Boys Club...Something about being well rounded? Speaking for my self, I think a lot of it was that cars were about the freedom of the open road. If you could keep it running you were going places. I blame California in the 60's. Monkey Mobile and Bat Mobile. And let's not for get the Oscar Mayer Weiner Mobile and the jingle. I remember a little bit about a trip to San Francisco, summer of 67. The crowds of people in cars inching along in traffic, and my dad complaining about the hippies. Good times.
                Last edited by Noel; 12-04-2018, 07:30 PM.

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                • #23
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjOOTaHa8GI

                  In the last minute, like a good joke comes the punch line. 10 working days later.

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                  • #24
                    500 hours? It' s need 20days+ without sleep

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                    • #25
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ID:	599966 It's all about time. Some days are more productive then others it seems and I think if I did 20 straight, I'd actually show progress. But I don't. I chip away, chip a way. Push the rock just to find another in the way.

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                      When the star align in productivity, for a old guy I get alot done. Not always, but some days.

                      But it does take some planning to make use good use of the time and space, not make a bigger mess then required or a greater disruption then necessary. I approach spraying paint as I do welding. I don't just blast it in there creating clouds of over spray and splatter leaving behind the color of the day.
                      This was a 30 degree C day, slight breeze, no neighbors and 10:30 am to wrapped up by 4pm effort.
                      I called it a good days effort.

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                      As it was, I used up the balance of product I had remaining, sprayed out the larger parts that were prepped and in bare metal, and look forward to doing some more assembly and fitting.

                      And speaking of assembly and fitting, welding. I'm getting kind of tired of it. I'm going to be trying my hand at panel adhesives to stick a few things together. Never to old to learn new tricks, or find new ways to skin something beside a cat. Doors, roof, quarter panels to name a few possibilities.
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                      But as I chip away and push the rock, I'm making progress.

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                      My buddy's car...it's not looking as shiny as it once did. It's a sad really. Something about bare metal and rust never sleeps it seems. He's talking about making it happen, time will tell.

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                      • #26
                        I don't have a collision estimating guide for reference old enough to go back to 1966. Mine is 1985. With that in mind, my assumption is it's easier to fix older, not harder, as things were less constructed. Arguable maybe, but assuming an old part is like new, then maybe so.

                        While a little knowledge can make you dangerous, it can also inform you when someone is out to gouge and screw you over. My relying on the book in getting estimates has confirmed that yet again.
                        I emailed a professional to inquire the cost of reskinning 6 doors. I'm attaching the same pictures.

                        My description was I have 6-1966 Chevelle Hard top doors needing new skins. The old shells have had the skins removed, they were chemically dipped, glass beaded, and after repairs were made they were sprayed in 2 part epoxy. Could you provide me with a price to complete the reassembly. I mentioned they were sitting loose in my basement ready to go as the final picture shows.

                        So we are clear, they are off the car... no removal required... the entire shell and the inside of the new after market skins sprayed in 2 part epoxy. All that's left is how long will it take and how much an hour do you charge.

                        The book say's 5.5 hours a door to reskin a 85 Impala hard top door. A Malibu was 4.5.
                        His estimate was just under $3000. Three thousand dollars! $500 a door. Either he thinks money grows on trees, is seriously over valuing the effort required for skills, or he's a crook. I thought the latter.

                        Not that he had to remove them, do more then scuff the sealing edges, or contend with dirty sheet metal to do the job, or reinstall them. You'd think after doing the first couple you'd be making great time on doing them, wouldn't you think? A professional, I don't think so.

                        My reply.

                        "While I have a few questions, I'm inclined not to ask them or comment further. Thank you for the effort you've extended, but I can say with certainty I won't be seeking your service."

                        I'm going to save around $2500 and will do them myself eventually. If an old guy who isn't a professional can't glue those in place in a day there is a problem. Rocket science it's not.
                        And if by chance it takes me 2 days, I'm still winning and money ahead. The hardest part will be carrying them out of the basement and back once the glue has dried.

                        On a side note to the reskinning, I've purchased 2 packages of adhesive with a 30 minute set time and more epoxy primer. If it ever stops raining, all it's going to take is one good day to make it happen.

                        Attached Files

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                        • #27
                          I think I see the problem.
                          You need one of these hydromigolic door lifter uppers.
                          Then ya ain't gotta beg somebody to help you.

                          BTW if you need an official Judge for certified inspection of 65 and 66 Chevells I can hook you up with a guy who can tell you every friggin thing that ain't correct on one of them cars. He lives over in Hamlin helping his wife run a bed & breakfast scam.

                          PS: you got a run in some of that coating.

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                          • #28
                            Don't look close Franz or you're likely to see a few more on further inspection. Lol...over all, for a back yard spraying, I'm doing not bad for an old guy and a touch up gun. I've gone through 3.5 gals. of product if you can believe that. But I've also covered a lot of bare metal using it up.
                            And no closer to picking a final color then when I first started?

                            Snot green epoxy is growing on me, I've used the last of the grey and switched back recently purchacing another 1 qt.A, 1 qt. B of the snot green epoxy and two packs of 30 minute set panel adhesive for the door reskinning. Two months of good weather left, I have lots to do.

                            One of those door lifts would be handy doing re and re work. With help of any kind hard to come by, a guy has to be creative humping heavy. I'm grateful they aren't bigger and heavier or filled with glass and hardware to make them so. Your picture does have me thinking, "I could build that".
                            I'm figuring 2-3 hours on the first one, 1.5 to 2 hours for all the others. I'll keep you post as I'm progressing.

                            If your buddy was closer, he'd be pointing things out and the red marker would run dry. But I do keep a pretty good handle on fasteners as I'm OCD enough to be paying attention to some detail knowing the small stuff on replacement can cost money. I also try and make the left and right match on mating parts on assembly, at least to the point of similar nuts and bolts. Nothing worse then grabbing a wrench and finding mismatched hardware requiring another walk to the tool box.

                            https://roadsidethoughts.com/sk/hamlin-profile.htm

                            Maybe he's closer then I thought? Or did you mean a different Hamlin?





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                            • #29
                              Hamlin NY on the S shore of Sewer Ontario.

                              I don't want to hurt your feelings, but, most of the internal components of that vintage were dip painted in black asphaltic coating and drip dried riding a chain conveyor for a few miles. I all too well remember 66 GM vehicles and seeing that paint method on every bumper bracket.

                              The nutballs are fun to watch argue for a couple hours about the authenticity of a bolt. My book says if the bolt is holding it's the correct bolt.
                              At least half of the car wasn't plastic back then, and none of the fasteners were Meowtrick. My 78 was half American and half Meowtrick. Royally urinated me to have to buy Meowtrick wrenches. I think US manufacturers conspired with SnapOn the favored tool of *******s around the world on that crap.

                              PS: I can walk 100 feet and check an original (mostly) K2534 with a 283 containing a HEI for paint drips if you need.

                              Door bracket is a walk in the park, 10 feet of 1" EMT and a bender. Hard part is the notched brackets, I'd go to 1" HDPE for those and GetRdun.

                              My new stash of HDPE is a lot of fun learning what it can do & strength of the material. Cuts with wood working tools, impact resistant and STRONG.
                              Drills and taps well too. You can even weld it if you have the patience of a Torah Scholar.

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                              • #30
                                That Hamlin? My mistake Franz. Not to say I'm not a little disappointed just the same.
                                You know...I was ok with metric wrenches. I figured I could use them to fix Euro cars. I didn't. Still don't. It's just my rule. I do however touch the orient.
                                However...It was metric everything else that was the screwing we took with the conversion. Milk. Meat. Veggies. Booze. The only good is in kilo's, there you get an extra .2?

                                101.9 a liter for regular gas... If your in BC add $0.40. Ontario...well it goes with out saying, more then us, less then them at $1.23. But the metric/ imperial inter breeding, that was as you mentioned just stupid. I guess the suppliers of OEM parts weren't going to just scrap what could be used and instead phased out creatively the soon to be not metric old stock? Those were ugly years all right.

                                But I'm no nuts and bolt purest. Leave that for the guys with more OCD then I've got and something to prove. I'm with you on the bolt theory. But I like them clean. And the bumper brackets and those kind of parts, lol...I'm going to paint white. And you want to know why? Probably not but I'll mention it anyways, it's brighter when working under a car. I'm sure you were thinking old school Merc custom maybe and maybe they were thinking ahead I don't know? Well that and I have a quart of Centari Artic White Acrylic Enamel and Catalyst that's old as dirt and need to be cracked to see if it has life and if it does will have to be used once opened as I'm sure the shelf life will be compromised as old the product is.

                                You mentioned HDPE. While I've used HDPE pipe to build a few things, most was temporary with taped fitted joints. I used most of it up when I replumbed the house. I do have a bit of 3 1/2" still for my dust collector extension when I vacuum leaves, with 30' into the main vent when I replaced the cast stack.

                                Just curious, what have you been building? With that previous post about play ground equipment and my son having a 5 year grand daughter that likes to climb, It got me thinking maybe build something?
                                I was thinking old school monkey bars and a small fort on top? A slide / toboggan run, Gladiator for kids kind of thing. It's just an idea I've been floating, not saying it's going anywhere. I'm sure like Bamboo, it's a useable product if you know when and how to use it.

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