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Some think it can't happen?

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  • Some think it can't happen?

    I took a frame in for straightening. It rolled in but didn't roll out? Sometime it costs you money to learn a lesson. The lesson was it was going to cost more to sue then the recovery was worth.
    It's how the system works it seems?
    I should have just reached across the counter and slapped him. Another of life's regrets.
    Live and learn. Anyways, I notice my name on two post and thought I go for a triple. This was the result of them screwing up, and having to do a welding repair to fix. Corvette axle shafts in case your wondering.

  • #2
    This is simply too vague. Would you care to go into a bit more detail or is this simply a Facebook style kind of rant?
    Esp. considering you hold the record for long explanations
    Did they attempt to bend from a wrong point or did they run current thru your parts?
    All I see is 3 close up shots of messed up splines

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    • #3
      The long story.

      I bought a 1966 Chevelle that hit a moose on the highway, the force spun the car around and buddy then got rear end by a driver going the other way.
      The car was toast, but as I discovered making an inquiry,
      buddy was in the process of collecting parts for a future restoration, had already redid the interior, white of all color choices, now covered in moose hair, blood and broken glass. My kind of deal.
      I was there in a blink with the cash to do the hostile take over, buy cheap, pillage parts and sell the scrap that remained.

      I brought it home and the comments started...
      Did I actually pay money for it? Is it worth fixing? Have I got a brain in my head? What's the plan?
      I admit..
      after the 6th or so about who would buy such a wreck came forth, my mind was made up, I was going to build another car. Or start to build another car? The plan came together slowly but was conceived around my interest in custom built highly modified cars, and with my budget, done on the cheap.

      I had bought previously a 96 Corvette salvage car for the chassis/ power train but rather then wreck a perfectly fine running car, I rattled trees and bushes finding a stripped down 91 Corvette chassis instead, sitting in a field 60 miles from home. Drove out, haggled and bought it, hooked up my tow bar and towed it home.
      I mention again, I towed it home on it's 4 wheels.

      I'll be the first to admit, not all my ideas pan out. I went in with the idea of buying a parts car. Then came the notion that I could fix the body and find another Chevelle chassis to mount it on? It was followed by just because most wouldn't doesn't mean I can't? Plan B. B for because.
      That's how I formed the idea?

      The idea was to do a frame stretch to the Corvette chassis extending the wheel base to Chevelle specs for length. Admittedly, like a Revell plastic model, drop and glue the Chevelle body to the frame, if it worked great, if not, I wasn't out much but a few weeks of spare time and the effort in trying to see if it held possibilities?
      Education costs ya money? I balanced what I knew, what I could do and took a shot at seeing if it could work. Turn out, it might? I jumped in. That in mind I spent some money on the additional repo parts to rebuild the body and purchasing the rolling 91 Corvette chassis.

      Now incase your wondering, a Corvette chassis, the front is HSLA, the back HSLA, the middle is mild steel. As you see in the pictures, It was a bit of work and done on a drive way, turned out well. Well enough that when I dropped my plumb bobs, I was pretty darn close to square enough to factory tolerances as my attached diagram shows, but19" longer. But everyone wants to see paper to confirm it so I went to see Edmonton Frame and Suspension.

      Again I mention, towing the chassis there on 4 rolling wheels, it was pushed on the rack, some trammels attached and a quote was given for $600 to $800 to true things up. I said go for it.
      Finally called 2 days later to come in to pick it up and they mentioned, "I" have of a small problem? Seems the car wasn't rolling any more? That and the bill has doubled? I had a problem all right.

      Mechanical failure...that's what they said. Turns out they at some point pushed a little hard, created a buckle and had to do some repairs to fix it? It was in seeing what they did that clued me in to the problem they caused and when I argued the point I was left with, mechanical failure and if I want the chassis pay the bill.

      See my previous post. That's arcing. That's not mechanical failure, and Edmonton Frame's response was to bad so sad, mechanical failure.

      Anyways, I had the chassis towed home on a flat deck, and proceeded to take the rear end apart. I knew something was welded into place, I just didn't know what or where? I assumed how, expecting it was the axle bearings? If you every have taken one apart, those shafts don't move much and breaking them free wasn't easy. He who say's a little welding doesn't go a long way never faced removing arced shafts.

      Turns out it was the axle shafts as my previous picture show. Posi track became a locker, as in locked in place. Surprisingly, the bearings spun freely although I'll change them latter as a matter of course in doing a rebuild, but the goal was discovery, clean up and make functional.

      Most don't think it can happen, but it does. Stray electrical currents finding a path to complete a circuit. Where the work clamp is placed does make a difference. I'm sure when buddy was fixing his mistake at my expense the car was bumped during welding causing the shafts to arc. That's my guess? Quite possibly a work clamp connection close to the area being welded may have prevented this? That's almost a fact?
      I should mention, his welding of the patch sucked. I ended up cutting it out and replacing it.

      So...the project is coming along. The taste however still lingers. That's the story.

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      • #4
        I guess if I have anything to add it would be it seemed like a good idea at the time, and time will tell if it was a good idea?

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        • #5
          I love it.
          Esp. when you consider most would have just attempted to install the 'vette IRS into the existing Chevelle frame.
          I believe something very stupid happened at the frame shop. Even Pros do stupid mistakes sometimes. We eat ours.
          In retrospect, you should have trusted your work. If that was your spec sheet in the photos, I would guess you were way ahead already. I highly doubt they actually did anything that wouldn't have been adjusted out with a normal alignment.
          My dad was a frame man and I studied under him all his working life. If it was flat and X't out to within less than a 1/16th... chances are it will move more than that when installed.
          Keep this thread going. use it as an inspiration to continue. Nice work.
          Are you going to install a cage?

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          • #6
            Thank you for those encouraging words. They go along way to supporting the continued effort I assure you. I call it the effort, but it's a
            ctually efforts.
            I also have more car projects I'm involved in completing. All slowly moving forward, key word slowly.
            When then say fools rush in where wise men fear to go, I'm in front.

            That was my spec sheet. I dropped lines, took measurements and in agreement, should have saved the money poached from me by the shysters. I had worked in a truck trailer repair shop years ago. Going in I new I was probably solid on my stretch. as long as the frame was reasonable straight? It had seen a minor hit on the front so I thought it couldn't hurt much, although it turns out it did in the wallet.

            My doing the stretch.. I thought it was going to be the easy and it was. Straight forward really. A nice straight section. Drilled out every spot weld GM installed.
            The whole idea going in was the work wasn't on stretching the frame it was going to be attaching the body. I pushed ahead.
            Stemming more from the result I trust welding or rather my welding, while I try and avoid work, the chassis had suspension intact, it was previously stripped of the body, I saw it as easy when looking at my options? My plan for the body was not to weld it down but glue it in place with panel adhesive? Worked for GM right? And like the model, done right the body should snap into place? I'm working it out as I go.

            I've recently stripped another Corvette down, and by down, it was mostly apart and gone when I got it but bare frame, body tub, rear frame and tank. Still a lot of work. But I salvaged the suspension hardware and brackets from it for a possible future project. If nothing else, the pattern/template it provides is both reminder and inspiration? But for the couple hun it cost, it also provided a gas tank with pump, support frame, active vin, and the small parts to make brake and fuel line mounting easier. It's a process.

            I also had doubts about my ability to modify the Chevelle frame as easily. To install the rear suspension would have required a serious back half frame modification. This was weekend warrior on the drive way. Also, with intentions of future fuel injection, this approach was in my mind, the simple approach using off the shelf and easily available parts.
            All I had to do was make things 19" longer?

            The original frame could have been pulled but I didn't go that way due to labour costs against what I could pick up a used frame for the money being spent. That and selfishly the posi the car held was destined for another Chevelle project idea so as you see, it's a bigger plan I have and the puzzle grows.

            In the end, it seemed like a good idea, that it might just work, and if nothing else, I can say I tried.

            You mention a cage, well, I'm hoping to avoid going fast enough to warrant it. I'm expecting the stiffer steel body will account for some added rigidity? But if a 502 dropped in my lap I'd give it consideration and change of direction?

            My struggles presently are a committed effort to finishing the reskinning of doors. I've got six. Long story to why six and not two but suffice to say, it got easier to do repairs after the first one was done, and I have other plans for the doors.
            I didn't get them sprayed out in epoxy primer after all the prep and repairs were completed. and I want to that before assembly.

            I need them together in order to hang them to the cowl body, set the A pillar post to front rocker, to set and fit the roof and qt. panels. It's a plan that's labor intensive but the end result will hopefully reflect the effort?

            I'll post a few more pictures, but weather here has gotten cold and I'm not much for suffering it affects so it's going to be sitting all winter as it has seemingly arrived?

            I do appreciate your encouragement to continue and will endeavor to do so. Thanks again.

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            • #7
              So do you do all your projects outdoors or do you actually put your daily drivers inside at night??
              Winter here is when we do our long projects.

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              Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
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              Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

              Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
              Miller 30-A Spoolgun
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              • #8
                Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                So do you do all your projects outdoors or do you actually put your daily drivers inside at night??
                Winter here is when we do our long projects.
                Because you asked, I haven't parked a daily in the garage in over 10 years. My daily drivers, they see weather and the curb. The drive way effort was due to no space inside the 2 car garage 22'x24'. But I made it work.

                While it might seem winter being a good time to do such things, it was easier for me to do things in place then clean out the space other projects in the garage filled as the pictures show.

                As it goes, I'm some what methodical. As a result, I have a bunch of parts waiting for installation, I have quite a few car parts that require epoxy primer presently in bare metal, and I have like the 6 Chevelle doors, a bunch just waiting. So between the stripping, degreasing, drilling spot welds, glass beading and paint, I can only say I'm making slow progress and putting out an effort when I find the time and energy to do so.

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                • #9
                  AH ha.
                  So what are the other projects ? The old coupe looks interesting.

                  www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                  Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                  MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                  Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                  Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                  Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                  Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                  Miller WC-115-A
                  Miller Spectrum 300
                  Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                  Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had a friend once tell me an African proverb. As I'm told, "a vulture is a very patient bird".

                    The car in the picture was a premarital asset from 1975. It's been with me quite a number of years and slowly over time is going together. It seems I'm in no rush to finish it, but in reality, I'm still learning how?
                    While I've made and spent money on it and other things, as most hobbies go, it gives me something to do it seems, indulges my interests and provide some challenges to overcome?

                    Because you asked...I have a second coupe now on the go. It was a bullet ridden shell bought for a rear steel fender. One thing led to another it seems. While using up spare parts, I also spend a bit to round things out, but it's mostly committing time to the effort that does it.
                    The one thing however that ties my hobbies and interests is welding.
                    Along the way though, I picked up a bit of knowledge on how to do others things.

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