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Aluminum Block Welding ?

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
    I read the info that you sent over, The way I read it is that it is heat treatable, That doesn't mean it has to be heat treated.It also mentioned that it can be used for welding on castings.However, To be honest with you I never second guessed Chris, I just bought some and tried it.The valley under the intake was open and the acid from the leaves and antifreeze along with the rain water had pitted the aluminum, Not to mention another welder tried to weld the block with a arc welder and blew holes into the oil galleries and left me a mess to clean up.
    Am by no means second guessing him.... but would love to hear his thoughts on his choice...

    it might be that the DeLorean/Renault block is an Alusil casting and 2319 is one of the acceptable fillers for that high silicon alloy..??

    If you get a chance to ask him... could you share it with us??

    it does look like 4943 is a viable filler for that these days as well..

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...highlight=4943
    Last edited by H80N; 01-01-2014, 12:25 PM.

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  • Portable Welder
    replied
    I read the info that you sent over, The way I read it is that it is heat treatable, That doesn't mean it has to be heat treated.

    It also mentioned that it can be used for welding on castings.

    However, To be honest with you I never second guessed Chris, I just bought some and tried it.

    The valley under the intake was open and the acid from the leaves and antifreeze along with the rain water had pitted the aluminum, Not to mention another welder tried to weld the block with a arc welder and blew holes into the oil galleries and left me a mess to clean up.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
    As of a couple of years ago when I was welding on a Delorian engine block, Chris told me to try some 2319, So I keep that on hand as well as some 1100 rod for doing thin aluminum.

    I've been welding The dirtiest, nastiest oil soaked aluminum for 20 years so I've gotten pretty good and can weld pretty much anything that I come across.

    I tig weld all kinds of piping from low pressure to Hi pressure hydraulics and never have a leak.

    All my customers think I'm the best thing out there and I'm not going to tell them any different.

    But when it comes to Chris I still look at his work and say Wow, He is truly a Artist.

    Good luck with what ever you decide.
    2319..??? that is one alloy I have not used... seems like an odd choice..

    ALLOY 2319 is one of the few Al-Cu alloy filler metals available.. and the literature says it needs post weld heat treatment..

    any idea why he would have chosen it??... always willing to learn new tricks..

    http://www.aircraftmaterials.com/data/weld/2319.html
    Last edited by H80N; 12-10-2013, 05:30 AM.

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  • Portable Welder
    replied
    As of a couple of years ago when I was welding on a Delorian engine block, Chris told me to try some 2319, So I keep that on hand as well as some 1100 rod for doing thin aluminum.

    I've been welding The dirtiest, nastiest oil soaked aluminum for 20 years so I've gotten pretty good and can weld pretty much anything that I come across.

    I tig weld all kinds of piping from low pressure to Hi pressure hydraulics and never have a leak.

    All my customers think I'm the best thing out there and I'm not going to tell them any different.

    But when it comes to Chris I still look at his work and say Wow, He is truly a Artist.

    Good luck with what ever you decide.

    Leave a comment:


  • hotrod1442
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    BTW... what did he suggest for filler...

    a number of us have had pretty good luck on Cast 356 with 4943 filler..

    (I am a pretty recent convert myself..)
    Yes, he said that he liked a fairly "new" filler rod........I don't have my notes in front of me, but I think that it was 4943.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    BTW... what did he suggest for filler...

    a number of us have had pretty good luck on Cast 356 with 4943 filler..

    (I am a pretty recent convert myself..)

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by hotrod1442 View Post
    I talked to Chris on the phone on Wed.

    Unfortunately he is recovering from knee surgery for the next couple of weeks.

    He did however give me some helpful tips/advise on setting up the machine that I have available to me.........I might still take a go at it (he seem confident I could do the small area myself)...... Or wait till he gets back, (and caught up on the back up of work @ his shop) and have him do it.
    Sounds like progress... these things do not usually happen overnight..

    PLS keep us posted... and as always... PICS.....

    Leave a comment:


  • hotrod1442
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Any News??.....
    I talked to Chris on the phone on Wed.

    Unfortunately he is recovering from knee surgery for the next couple of weeks.

    He did however give me some helpful tips/advise on setting up the machine that I have available to me.........I might still take a go at it (he seem confident I could do the small area myself)...... Or wait till he gets back, (and caught up on the back up of work @ his shop) and have him do it.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Any News??.....

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by hotrod1442 View Post
    H80N,

    Sent you a PM
    Got It..!!!...

    Leave a comment:


  • hotrod1442
    replied
    H80N,

    Sent you a PM

    Leave a comment:


  • hotrod1442
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    TIG welding with a Dynasty is a whole new world..

    They're not your Daddy's Syncrowave..

    If you would like to see some real magic... take a look at John Marcella's work..

    this is from another old thread
    Yes, I've seen his work..........he has some SERIOUS Tig welding skills!

    His stuff is total perfection! Pieces of art...... under the hoods of race cars

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    TIG welding with a Dynasty is a whole new world..

    They're not your Daddy's Syncrowave..

    If you would like to see some real magic... take a look at John Marcella's work..

    this is from another old thread

    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    There are some guys that have brought sheet metal manifolds to an artform..

    John Marcella is one of them... his work is just beautiful..

    Here are some videos...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGPgsXwgQkQ

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Db6BVMANvW0

    Here is the link to his website... lots of pics

    http://marcellamanifolds.net/images/Images.html

    (And yes I realize it is an old thread..and that some have seen this work.. but it is so nice... it may serve as an example of the art...)
    Last edited by H80N; 12-01-2013, 12:56 PM.

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  • hotrod1442
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Only 87 miles from Sarnia to Chris Razor's shop in Plymouth, MI...

    you might consider having him do the welding for you..

    it is a pretty expensive block.. and you may not want to practice on it..

    just a thought..
    I kinda wanted to give it a whirl myself..........you don't learn if you don't try mentality

    But your probably right,.... Man, after watching those YouTube clips, those inverter Dynasty machines are incredible (able to weld thick sections, to thin, without preheat to the heavy area)

    And yes, Chris Razor OBVIOUSLY has the skills to do the job correctly!

    Well, I also have a set of Magnesium valve covers that need some corners added to them..........I definitely wouldn't attempt that job myself, so maybe I'll kill two birds with one stone and take them down with the block.

    Thanks, Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Only 87 miles from Sarnia to Chris Razor's shop in Plymouth, MI...

    you might consider having him do the welding for you..

    it is a pretty expensive block.. and you may not want to practice on it..

    just a thought..
    Last edited by H80N; 12-01-2013, 10:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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