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Welding 1/2" 4140 bar

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Myself, considering all the different beam sizes out there, would find going that route hard to resist.
    You would be hard pressed to find much advantage fabbing that part, IMO,
    out of 4140, and getting it both straight enough, and welded good enough, to exceed a heavy beam.
    You could even machine on the beam and make it very nice.
    Please don't take this wrong but the very fact that you present this question raises an eyebrow about whether or not this is a good idea for YOU to do.
    Billet would be the way to go. Esp. for a master machinist.
    Have you seen any made from aluminum?

    Leave a comment:


  • wagspe208
    replied
    Here is a picture old one on the right. Metal on the left. Ran out of coolant and steam.

    BTW, surface finish. I am open to suggestions. It must not be "coated". I must be able to see if cracks develop. I was thinking of parkarizing. It is in the water about 3 hours a weekend. 10 weeks a year for races.
    Thanks
    Wags
    Attached Files

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  • davedarragh
    replied
    "4140"

    wag: visit www.interlloy.com.au for some of your answers.

    Dave

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  • wagspe208
    replied
    This is a proven design. I am not reinventing the wheel. Some guys make them out of I beam and cut one flange off. Some make them of mild steel. I am sure material is strong enough. Probably overkill for my class, but no reason to skimp here.
    I will try to post a picture tonight.
    Thanks
    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Aerometalworker
    replied
    Is this a design that has been proven, and your just looking for how to fabricate it correctly? Or is this a new design as well? Yes welding 4140 in general requires pre and post heats. Pictures would help, prints are better, and any other engineering data you have would be very helpful in understanding the loads and cycles placed on the part. Beware the "shooting from the hip" answers.
    -Aaron

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    You will need to post pictures and hopefully some good ones to get your best advise. There are many folks here who know things about metal that may or may not be familiar with your exact thing.
    They may have much better advice than what is currently being done by other racers.
    BTW what is the finish on the outside of this piece when it is installed?

    Leave a comment:


  • wagspe208
    started a topic Welding 1/2" 4140 bar

    Welding 1/2" 4140 bar

    Ok, here goes. I have a drag boat. In that drag boat, there is a strut. This is the piece that holds the propshaft in place just in front of the prop. Meaning about .250" in front of the prop. It is LOADED!
    On a hydro, the lower half of the prop carries the weight of the back half of the boat. The boat runs 8.0 et @ 55 to 160 mph. About 900 hp into the propshaft.
    Best case scenario if the strut fails, it rips the bottom out of the boat, and the boat sinks. Worst..well, RIP.
    So, the strut is a tube welded to a vertical .500 plate to a horizontal .500 plate. Or a "t" with a tube on the bottom.
    1) Do I need to preheat? If so, how hot, and how critical is the preheat temp.
    2) Filler metal.
    3) Some flexing would be much better than cracking.
    4) What am I forgetting?
    Thanks
    As you can see, this is a critical piece. I know for a fact my buddies was welded without preheating. I read many threads and wonder if that was the right way to do it. (I did not do it)

    Wags

    PS, I only have a 180 amp mig welder. I have a Dynasty 300 tig.
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