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Need some advice TIG welding patch panels

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  • Rhinox
    replied
    Need some advice TIG welding patch panels

    on thin stuff like that ... i always use tig (pulse)
    depending on how good you are with the tig pulse is the way to go.... if you dont have a fancy machine .... use the pedal as a pulse.... this is easily done that way too!! not big fan of buttons or switches ... but either pulse or use your pedal! its basically doing several tacks as you travel!! back step your welds also... and if you see a small gap on your travel ... keep pulsing using "lay- wire technique" ... hope you know what i mean ... otherwise i think i would stick with mig in that case!!!
    enjoy

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  • Georgie
    replied
    what about using reverse polarity? wouldn't that put less heat into the sheet metal?

    Thnaks

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  • nocheepgas
    replied
    I use 3M 2" discs on my die grinder, I don't remember what they are made of but they are designed to run cooler you can even grind with them wet, which really helps preventing heat build up.

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  • dkGoodrich dot com
    replied
    Do you start dollying the bead asap?

    Ex: Spot weld, quickly dolly, let cool slowly, go to another area of the panel and repeat. Keep repeating entire seam is filled with spot welds.. right?

    I like the cut off wheel trick on a die grinder. Works great for removing spot welds as well.

    Thanks for your time

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  • Dmaxer
    replied
    If the hardness of your MIG welds is a factor making grinding them down tedious, try .023 ESAB Easy Grind (available in 11 lb rolls and larger). It makes for softer and more malleable beads.

    If you keep your hammer/dolly work confined to just the weld, you can get the surrounding metal to return to it's original shape. When shrinkage occurs, it's just the weld puddle itself getting smaller, not the parent material.

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Dull abrasives will create lots of heat while grinding. You can't use a grinding disk until it's worn completely down while doing body work. You have to keep putting fresh disks on or else you'll end up heating the panel up and warping it.

    Backstitch or backstep welding will also help to keep panel distortion down. Just imagine if you had to weld a new quarter panel on an Econoline van with an oxy acetelyne torch!! It's been done before.

    Hope this helps a bit.

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  • wrenchnride247
    replied
    Originally posted by KarateBoy View Post
    That's one of the coolest thing I've ever heard.

    any pics of the type of heat sink?
    Get about a 8-12" piece of 1" copper pipe from the hardware store, and flatten out about half of it. Then put about a 45 deg. angle on it. You can get fancy with a handle, or just wrap some electrical tape on it. You can make others with different sizes if needed.

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  • nocheepgas
    replied
    Originally posted by KarateBoy View Post
    That's one of the coolest thing I've ever heard.

    any pics of the type of heat sink?
    I use a big hunk of aluminum (2x4x6) and keep it in the freezer.

    Leave a comment:


  • KarateBoy
    replied
    Originally posted by QuazI View Post
    could try using a heat sink if at all possible....worked wonders for any thin stuff I've ever done!!!!
    That's one of the coolest thing I've ever heard.

    any pics of the type of heat sink?

    Leave a comment:


  • QuazI
    replied
    could try using a heat sink if at all possible....worked wonders for any thin stuff I've ever done!!!!

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  • pdog
    replied
    Got it, thanks

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  • wrenchnride247
    replied
    When you try the cut-off wheel method, keep it 90 deg. to the bead (like you're going to cut with it) and use light pressure so you don't dig into the base metal. Then switch to the "flapper" or sanding disc for a smoother finish.

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  • pdog
    replied
    Got it, good point. I didn't fully weld the patch panel in the first quarter, so I can hammer/dolly from this point on while finishing it.

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  • crawdaddy
    replied
    One thing I might add when welding thin panels some of your distortion is going to be caused by your weld bead shrinking as it cools.You should hammer and dolly your beads as you connect the dots between your tack welds.This will help stretch the welds and minimize warpage,and remember anytime you cool the weld quickly with compressed air or water it will shrink the metal, let your welds cool slowly.Mike

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  • pdog
    replied
    All great advice, thanks guys. This coming weekend I will mess with both. Since I have one part of the quarter already patched using the Mig, I still have to grind down the welds and will using the advice you guys provided. I will also spend some time messing with some thin scraps with the Tig and see how I do. Who knows, maybe it will work out better for me, at least it will give me more of a reason to tell the wife I need to go out in the garage to practice more

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